Pre-made AR messages? Recommended or...?

26 replies
Hey guys,

I got my hands on several swipe files for affiliate marketing, internet marketing, etc that I can use for my autoresponder messages.

I've read through them and they are very readable, but I dont know if this is like taboo in the comunnity to use them.

Can it still be profitable if I use solely these AR messages in my messages?

What do you guys think?
#messages #premade #recommended
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

    I dont know if this is like taboo in the comunnity to use them.
    I don't know about "taboo in the community", but if you didn't write them, or buy them, or acquire rights to them, or if they're not "public domain" or whatever, it's not legal to use them. Breach of copyright, you know?

    You can take ideas from them, but not words. Is the gist. (I'm not a lawyer).

    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

    Can it still be profitable if I use solely these AR messages in my messages?
    It can be, perhaps, but not nearly as profitable as using your own. How are you going to brand yourself, and have your own continuity-process, by using someone else's? These are the things that typically make the difference between having a really high open-rate and a really low open-rate and losing people (and income). This thread will perhaps help you a lot, Edwin: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982

    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

    What do you guys think?
    I think your income depends on your continuity-process, and you won't really have one, without your own autoresponder emails?

    And don't forget that in your autoresponder emails, you need to be "pre-selling", not "selling"!
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    • Profile picture of the author aprilm
      In my opinion, it's very important for your subs to get to know the real you. Sooner or later, those AR messages are going to run out, and when they do, you will have to write your own. The change in style will be noticeable....especially to those who eagerly await your emails.

      Relationship building is a very important part of list building.
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  • Profile picture of the author PolicyMaker
    Learn to Write Your Own AR - It's a Skill will help you in Long Run...With respect to Profitability Depends upon Lots of Factors NOT Just AR...
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  • Profile picture of the author AndrewStark
    What is the product the emails are promoting?

    If it's an evergreen service that will be just as relevant to your new subscribers next year as it will be today then by all means use them. If you're worried about the relationship spend a few minutes adding your own style to each message and putting your own signature at the bottom of each message.

    If possible take some of the messages and turn them into a blog post, then you will really be able to build that relationship and get some SEO link juice happening as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hamida Harland
    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post


    I got my hands on several swipe files for affiliate marketing, internet marketing, etc that I can use for my autoresponder messages.
    If you got them as affiliate tools provided by the product vendor then there's no reason why you shouldn't use them. I know in IM I often see several marketers use the same pre-written AR messages though and unless you rewrite them at least a bit, it doesn't look good (it looks like you couldn't be bothered personalizing them).

    I sometimes check out the email swipes for Clickbank products for reference, but don't think I've ever used one word for word. They're usually high on hype and low on content, and not the kind of email my subscribers are used to. IMHO it's better to put a bit of effort into your emails and put some of your personality into them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Big Al
    I think it does depend on your list and the traffic source.

    Just an observation but:

    Most of the email swipes provided by vendors aren't my cup of tea but it seems there are some big affiliates using them successfully. Can't argue with that but I think -- always dangerous -- these are the kind of affiliates who add thousands to their list each and every month. Affiliates with a high turnover of subscribers and who know exactly how long they have to make their money back (and profit) on their advertising budget.

    IMHO it's easier to build a list where you work on building a relationship which means trying to add your own voice to your emails. Which comes back to getting ideas from swipe emails but not necessarily using them as they come.

    Last little brain fart... if you are swiping emails. How do you know if you're swiping a good email or a bad email. And if it was good, for what kind of list?
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    • Profile picture of the author Kal Sallam
      Originally Posted by Big Al View Post

      I think it does depend on your list and the traffic source.

      Just an observation but:

      Most of the email swipes provided by vendors aren't my cup of tea but it seems there are some big affiliates using them successfully. Can't argue with that but I think -- always dangerous -- these are the kind of affiliates who add thousands to their list each and every month. Affiliates with a high turnover of subscribers and who know exactly how long they have to make their money back (and profit) on their advertising budget.

      IMHO it's easier to build a list where you work on building a relationship which means trying to add your own voice to your emails. Which comes back to getting ideas from swipe emails but not necessarily using them as they come.

      Last little brain fart... if you are swiping emails. How do you know if you're swiping a good email or a bad email. And if it was good, for what kind of list?
      Yet your Sig is offering plr emails?
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  • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
    The messages aren't exactly swipes but pre written messages that a product provided to newbie list builders. There are actually not hypey and deliver little tidbits of tips. I'll post a sample message when I get home so I can get your opinions
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  • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
    Here's an example pre-made AR message for the affiliate marketing niche (its pretty long):

    Subject:
    Code:
    How to Create a PDF Report to Give Away- 3 Steps to Creating a Great Report
    Code:
    One of the best ways you can build your online business is by
    giving away free information.
    
    When you give away free information you're more than likely
    doing it in exchange for an e-mail address.
    
    One of the best pieces of information you can give away is
    a free report.  
    
    The reason a report is so valuable is because it allows you to
    give something with a higher perceived value.
    
    For many people, a PDF report is seen as something that is
    high in quality.
    
    Compare that to e-mail lessons that might not be seen as having
    the same high quality information.
    
    When creating a report, there are few common rules you need
    to follow that I'd like to explain.
    
    Step #1-  Create a Killer Name for Your Report
    
    The name is everything in your report.  Nobody wants to read
    a report called "Make Money Online"  or "Lose Weight Fast".
    
    Most people will be attracted to the shiny piece of material
    that you're offering them.
    
    One of the best ways you can do this at first is to create a
    great name for the product you're offering.
    
    You also have a better change of your PDF report going viral
    if it has a better name.
    
    Step #2-  Format Your Report the Right Way
    
    When you create your report, you have to make it easy for
    people to read.
    
    By creating it as a PDF you're already doing it the right way.
    
    However, make sure that you break up the report nicely so 
    it is easy to read.
    
    Most people get turned off when they see a whole bunch of text 
    jumbled together.
    
    You can break this up by making the paragraphs smaller and
    adding images in to give their eyes a break.
    
    It will also make your report look a lot more professional.
    
    Step #3-  Give Your Report Away in Exchange for Something
    
    While your report doesn't cost anything, it's important that you
    try and get something in return.
    
    Usually the best thing you can do is to get an e-mail address
    so you can help build your list.
    
    If the report is good, then other people will link to your site
    and that will help you build your list.
    
    It's also important to create links in your report that are for
    affiliate products or links that go back to your site.
    
    This way, people who access your report via a direct link
    will still be of benefit to you.
    
    INSERT CALL TO ACTION HERE
    What do you guys think? If I do a little tweaking here and there to make it flow better and sound more human, is it OK if I use these pre-made AR messages?

    Or a better option instead of using a long email like this is put it on a blog? How does that one sound?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

      If I do a little tweaking here and there to make it flow better and sound more human, is it OK if I use these pre-made AR messages?
      It wouldn't be ok at all, for me.

      Not as a marketer, and not as a subscriber. To me, it's all "same-old, same-old", exactly like 100 others I've read before, and after a couple of those I'd be unsubscribing, pronto.

      Here are the two big, important questions on which your long-term income depends, Edwin ...

      1. What does it do to brand you, and strengthen the trust-based relationship you're building up with your subscribers?

      2. What does it do to enhance and perpetuate your continuity-process and ensure that the next email is awaited, expected, opened and read?

      Those two things, regardless of the niche, are the purposes of every email I send out.

      http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982
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      • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        It wouldn't be ok at all, for me.

        Not as a marketer, and not as a subscriber. To me, it's all "same-old, same-old", exactly like 100 others I've read before, and after a couple of those I'd be unsubscribing, pronto.

        Here are the two big, important questions on which your long-term income depends, Edwin ...

        1. What does it do to brand you, and strengthen the trust-based relationship you're building up with your subscribers?

        2. What does it do to enhance and perpetuate your continuity-process and ensure that the next email is awaited, expected, opened and read?

        Those two things, regardless of the niche, are the purposes of every email I send out.

        http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982
        Where do you get ideas for what to put in your AR sequence?
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

          Where do you get ideas for what to put in your AR sequence?
          From all the research I've done for the articles I write for the niche. (I know, I know: that's "easy for me to say", but it works out that way for me because I happen to be an article marketer - that's how I get my traffic - so I have to have done the research anyway, otherwise I wouldn't have managed to build the list in the first place.)

          I don't pretend that every email I send out is exclusively brand new, unheard of, totally unknown content, of course (far from it!), but I always try to include something they won't previously have seen online, and I always start off by reminding them of why they're receiving this email and "where we were" in the last one, and I always end up (sometimes even on a "cliffhanger", if I can) by telling them what's coming up in 5 days' time and why they need to read it, and so on. It works for me.

          No continuity -------> no income.

          It helps me to remind myself, all the time, that my subscribers are on 7 other people's lists as well, and I have to stand out from the other 7 marketers if I want to become the person the customers get to know, and trust, and like, enough for me to be the one through whose links they "buy stuff" when I do promote it.

          It looks from your post above as if you're in the "IM niche"? So this will apply to you, also, except that in your case it will be 17 other people's lists, for the typical subscriber, not 7, like mine!
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          • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
            Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

            From all the research I've done for the articles I write for the niche. (I know, I know: that's "easy for me to say", but it works out that way for me because I happen to be an article marketer - that's how I get my traffic - so I have to have done the research anyway, otherwise I wouldn't have managed to build the list in the first place.)

            I don't pretend that every email I send out is exclusively brand new, unheard of, totally unknown content, of course (far from it!), but I always try to include something they won't previously have seen online, and I always start off by reminding them of why they're receiving this email and "where we were" in the last one, and I always end up (sometimes even on a "cliffhanger", if I can) by telling them what's coming up in 5 days' time and why they need to read it, and so on. It works for me.

            No continuity -------> no income.

            It helps me to remind myself, all the time, that my subscribers are on 7 other people's lists as well, and I have to stand out from the other 7 marketers if I want to become the person the customers get to know, and trust, and like, enough for me to be the one through whose links they "buy stuff" when I do promote it.

            It looks from your post above as if you're in the "IM niche"? So this will apply to you, also, except that in your case it will be 17 other people's lists, for the typical subscriber, not 7, like mine!

            So the way you format your emails is:

            *Remind them who you are, and why they subscribed
            *Remind what the thing you sent them last time was about
            *Talk to them about the new thing you have in this email
            *Make them excited for the next email with a cliff hanger or something

            Is this correct?
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            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

              So the way you format your emails is:

              *Remind them who you are, and why they subscribed
              *Remind what the thing you sent them last time was about
              *Talk to them about the new thing you have in this email
              *Make them excited for the next email with a cliff hanger or something

              Is this correct?
              Yes.

              I also err on the "long side", with mine, because they're going out to people who were originally attracted by a long article (typically 1,200 - 1,500 words), and when they opted in on my site it was after/while looking at long content there, and they were expressly promised "more of the same", so that's what they want and expect. That has a lot to do with customer demographics, in other words, and maybe a little bit to do with the niches as well (not to the same extent, though) ... in other words, that part of it, that predicates my using "long content", may not necessarily apply to others in the same way.

              On a side-note, another thing I didn't like about the email you quoted above is that all the paragraphs were nearly the same length. I like a mixture of longer paragraphs and punchy one-liners. I think it helps the punchy one-liners draw attention and "stick".

              Just my perspective.
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              • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
                Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                Yes.

                I also err on the "long side", with mine, because they're going out to people who were originally attracted by a long article (typically 1,200 - 1,500 words), and when they opted in on my site it was after/while looking at long content there, and they were expressly promised "more of the same", so that's what they want and expect. That has a lot to do with customer demographics, in other words, and maybe a little bit to do with the niches as well (not to the same extent, though) ... in other words, that part of it, that predicates my using "long content", may not necessarily apply to others in the same way.
                Cool! So you give them the content in the email?

                I think I'll give it in a blog so they can click over
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                • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                  Banned
                  Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

                  Cool! So you give them the content in the email?
                  Yes, and I'm re-using some of the material in my articles to do so, so it doesn't take me nearly as long to write as you might think. It does mean that occasionally, somewhere in the autoresponder series, people will get an email from me of which they've seen some of the material/content before, but I don't care, and neither do they, as far as I know.

                  Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

                  I think I'll give it in a blog so they can click over
                  This has advantages and disadvantages. It can certainly work well, though.

                  One of the good things about it is that it "trains your people" to click on your links, even when you're not promoting something, expecting and finding something new/good/different. This will greatly increase your CTR when you are promoting something.

                  I think it also works well to do that sometimes, and other times give the information in an email. You don't want people thinking "Oh, this is the guy who just sends a link to his own blog", because that may reduce your open-rate a little, too. If only because some may be more likely to think "I'll come back to that later" and then forget (it can happen)?
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                • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
                  Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

                  I think I'll give it in a blog so they can click over
                  To be honest, I don't see the logic behind it, but I do see a lot of people doing this.

                  It's more like an updates kind of thing, a newsletter. But as Alexa pointed out, if this is all they receive, why would they bother subscribe in the first place, or open emails? Except for the fact that you remind them to visit your website, there's no other benefit.

                  You should (at least that's what I do) offer content exclusively through your emails, so they have a reason to stay on your list.

                  And remember many people read their emails on their mobile devices, so you would have to have in place a mobile version of your website as well, if this is what you plan to do.

                  If you want to see a type of email Alexa refers to when it comes to formatting, subscribe to Paul Myers emails: TalkBiz News: What you really need to know to succeed online - Online business building newsletter

                  By the way, girl, you were on fire in this thread - great responses, thanks.
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          • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
            Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

            [...] and I always start off by reminding them of why they're receiving this email and "where we were" in the last one, and I always end up (sometimes even on a "cliffhanger", if I can) by telling them what's coming up in 5 days' time and why they need to read it, and so on. It works for me.
            I know you appertain to the school of thought that frowns upon personalized emails, such as those that use subscribers' first name as an introduction, for example, but do you use personalized information when reminding them why the're receiving your emails, such as "you are receiving this email because you've signed up with the following email address: <email_address>, on this date: <signup_date>, on my website: www.cauliflowersouprecipes.info"?

            It's personalized, but it's not salesman-type like, if you know what I mean? (Or maybe it doesn't matter with email addresses, just with first names? :confused

            Anyway, to cut the story short, can you give an example of email opening that reminds the reader why they are receiving this email? My only example was the one above, but I'd like to make it more interesting or readable, that one is really technical and boring.

            And why is it necessary to do it in every email? Is it because the distance of the emails?

            Also, I assume you don't make your website address clickable, right? (You don't want people to go back to your website when they should read your emails.)

            BTW, where's your other leg? :confused:
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            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

              do you use personalized information when reminding them why the're receiving your emails, such as "you are receiving this email because you've signed up with the following email address: <email_address>, on this date: <signup_date>, on my website: www.cauliflowersouprecipes.info"?

              It's personalized, but it's not salesman-type like, if you know what I mean?
              I know exactly what you mean, and I do. But only periodically.

              I only need to do it periodically because of the way most of the emails start off (see below).

              I'll occasionally start an email with "Thanks for subscribing to my email series at my site cauliflowersoup-all-around.info, 15 emails ago. I'm always interested to know how people are finding all this information about cauliflowers, if ever you want to get in touch. (Or, of course, if you're already fully satiated on cauliflowers, and have switched your alliegance to courgettes, about which I know nothing, you can always unsubscribe by clicking on the link right at the end of any email.)"

              I also sometimes like to end on a "cliff-hanger", kind of "to be revealed in 5 days' time", because I think that keeps people interested and helps them to expect, await, open and read the next mail. It's all about continuity.

              Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

              can you give an example of email opening that reminds the reader why they are receiving this email?
              Yes, something like this ...

              " Hello again,

              You'll perhaps be wanting to know more about the fossilized cauliflowers and soup-bowls that NASA's rover recently dug up on the surface of Mars, which I mentioned at the end of my message 5 days ago. So, to tell you rest of the story ... "

              Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

              why is it necessary to do it in every email? Is it because the distance of the emails?
              I don't do it in every email, to be honest.

              But it's naive to imagine (even in my slightly-less-competitive niches) that my readers aren't on other people's lists too, and some may receive a lot of email, and mine go out 5 days apart (after the first few), so it does no harm to remind people, I think?

              Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

              Also, I assume you don't make your website address clickable, right? (You don't want people to go back to your website when they should read your emails.)
              I send both HTML and plain-text together, so they open whichever version is the default in their email client. (I'm so non-techie and incompetent at dealing with this stuff that for a long time I thought I was sending plain-text only, and it turned out I was sending both ).

              I do like people to click on links to my site, though: I think it's good to "train your people" to click on your links right from the start, even in the PDF freebie they get for signing up. I think this means you sell more when you do send them a link to a sales page, because they're used to clicking on your links and finding something they like. I even have some pages on some of my sites that can be accessed only by clicking on email links, i.e. they won't find them in the "site navigation system"..

              Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

              where's your other leg? :confused:

              Resting on the knee of the one you see: I'm sitting on the window-sill, to put my shoes on. It's true that I'm a little disabled in the way you know about, but I do have two legs, I promise.

              Originally Posted by thebitbotdotcom View Post

              Its better to write your own in my opinion..instead of "letting the product owner speak for you".
              This. Definitely this. For so many reasons!
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              • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
                Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post


                Resting on the knee of the one you see ... but I do have two legs, I promise.

                My heart stopped for a moment, there. But not because of what you'd think, just because it would have been such a waste to buy a pair of Louboutins and have to throw one shoe away. :p
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                • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                  Banned
                  Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

                  it would have been such a waste to buy a pair of Louboutins and have to throw one shoe away. :p
                  Yes indeed ... nobody can argue with that.

                  (Well, you'd need to find another person who'd lost the counterpart limb, and share the cost with them, I guess? Better stop now, in case we both get banned for being so politically incorrect about disability! ).
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Autoresponder messages provided for affiliate are usually
    written by a copywriter to be used by affiliates for that
    product or service. So the product owner would want
    you to use them, especially if they have been tested
    and shown to convert well.

    What most marketers call an autoresponder series
    is quite different from my personal definition. For
    example, the swipe you provided is a newsletter style
    article and not an autoresponder message in my book.

    Many AR series messages are not connected in anyway
    and so should not have the word "series" attached to them.

    -Ray Edwards
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    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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  • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
    Thanks guys!

    Its better to just make your own AR messages.

    Another question, where do you come up with ideas for your AR sequence? I know Frank Kern does 'Results In Advance' which is where you basically make a timeline and plot the 4 biggest obstacles stopping your potential prospect from reaching their end goal, then provide them with free and paid help that can help get them there.

    Is this is a good way to go about it?
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  • Profile picture of the author thebitbotdotcom
    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

    Hey guys,

    I got my hands on several swipe files for affiliate marketing, internet marketing, etc that I can use for my autoresponder messages.

    I've read through them and they are very readable, but I dont know if this is like taboo in the comunnity to use them.

    Can it still be profitable if I use solely these AR messages in my messages?

    What do you guys think?
    In my experience, pre-written autoresponder messages provided by a product owner are usually so aggressive in terms of recommending the product that they usually get picked off by the spam filter...and never end up in the inbox.

    I have seen this happen pretty consistently...

    Its better to write your own in my opinion..instead of "letting the product owner speak for you".
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