Earn $82.90 per Hour with Even a Poor Performing Kindle Book: Kindle Case Study

42 replies
If you have tried to wrap your head around the concept of passive income, then this Kindle case study makes it easy to see how it works, and also why it is worth spending your time doing.

I decided to make a case study out of one of my WORST Kindle books. It didn't suck exactly... but it was actually written as more of a training exercise.

First of all, if you do not have any formal qualifications (no college/university), then using Kindle to create yourself a passive income can earn you far more than most normal offline jobs would pay.
  • $10 per hour is about what an inexperienced blue collar worker earns
  • $20 per hour may be earned by someone with a bit more experience
  • $30 per hour generally requires at least some qualifications
Where passive income gets tricky is trying to figure out how much it will earn compared with money you would make up-front in a normal job.

Because passive income's real value can only be seen over time (usually at least 6 months), it is easy to get discouraged and go for a bit of money quickly, rather than more money over the longer term.

For this case study I compared spending 3 hours working offline against using 3 hours creating a passive income source.

For the job offline I was paid $18 per hour for 3 hours of work - a total of $54 earned.

For the passive income stream I did very basic internet research about ways to save money, then wrote a short book about it and published to Kindle. I spent less than 3 hours on it in total, and only used Kindle's built-in KDP Select option for promotion.

I priced the book at $2.99 so that I could get the 70% royalty, so I earned $2.09 per sale.

In the first month I only sold 10 copies of my Kindle book.

Crap! Only $20.90 for 3 hours of work. Less than 7 bucks an hour

But... it kept selling, and on average has sold 17 copies per month over the past 7 months.

So far...
119 sales
$248.71 recieved in royalties

All without any additional work. The only time spent was that initial 3 hours.

That 3 hours of work has now earned me $248.71, which works out to over $82.90 per hour and it is still selling each month, making more money for me!

When starting out it is worth balancing your time spent doing jobs that pay immediately (online or offline), against time setting up passive income streams.

I recommend spending at least 1 hour working on passive income for every 4 hours you spend doing up-front payment work.

Would you rather work for 3 hours and get $54 or over $248?

With passive income, always measure the time you actively spent working on something, rather than the passing of time.

Some people make the mistake of looking at this kind of case study and saying "oh, this method only makes $248 in 7 months - what a waste of time!" When actually, this method only took 3 hours.

I believe that using Kindle to make money is achievable for most people. Essentially, if you know how to write a blog post, you should be able to put together a book and publish it on Kindle.

If you are thinking about giving Kindle a go, hopefully this help you decide to take the leap
#$8290 #book #case #case study #earn #hour #kindle #money #passive #performing #poor #study
  • Profile picture of the author lotsofsnow
    Originally Posted by JamieSEO View Post

    Some people make the mistake of looking at this kind of case study and saying "oh, this method only makes $248 in 7 months - what a waste of time!" When actually, this method only took 3 hours.
    Well, that is very nice.

    But you have to also calculate the hours it took you to learn all about Kindle.

    Let's say you are a fast learner and it only took you 40 hours.

    Now the math looks a little different, right?

    Not saying that Kindle publishing is bad. You just have to calculate everything.

    Originally Posted by JamieSEO View Post

    I believe that using Kindle to make money is achievable for most people. Essentially, if you know how to write a blog post, you should be able to put together a book and publish it on Kindle.

    If you are thinking about giving Kindle a go, hopefully this help you decide to take the leap
    There is a lot more needed then the ability to write a blog post.

    If somebody can write a blog post that person might or might not be able to write a book and publish it.

    Yes, it can be done and yes, it can be accomplished by a lot of people.

    It's just not that easy. Good for you if you got it made though!

    PS:
    I did publish several books on Amazon for the Kindle but somehow
    it took me way longer than a few hours.
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    • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
      Originally Posted by hpgoodboy View Post


      But you have to also calculate the hours it took you to learn all about Kindle.

      Let's say you are a fast learner and it only took you 40 hours.

      Now the math looks a little different, right?
      On the other hand, that is a skill you have forever and, if she puts up another 9 books then it averages out at 4 hours learning per book and the maths looks different again.

      Not to mention the more intangible benefit of her now being a published author and perceived expert. If she gets public speaking gigs because of the book, or JVs, that could increase the ROI exponentially.

      Martin
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      • Profile picture of the author Jerry Belcourt
        JamieSEO,

        Thanks for posting your case study on your results on the Kindle platform!

        I've been thinking waaaaay too long about doing exactly as you described
        and need to just do it too!

        Sounds like you quickly wrote, what amounted to a healthy blog post and
        published it as an ebook on the Kindle platform.

        That is awesome!!

        It's really an eye opener when you think about all of the tablets, smart phones
        and mobile devices that are on the market. There's an insatiable appetite for
        ebooks and other digital content for this massive amount of mobile device owners!

        I'm looking forward to posting my first case study soon!

        Please keep us informed of your progress.

        Thanks,

        JB
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by hpgoodboy View Post

      It's just not that easy.
      PS:
      I did publish several books on Amazon for the Kindle but somehow
      it took me way longer than a few hours.
      Doing something new is never easy, however back when I was a student I earned minimum wage slaving away in a sweltering bakery during summer, surrounded by ovens, chopping heaps of vegetables and burning myself on hot trays.

      When I compare that with doing a bit of basic research and dumping my knowledge into writing... 'easy' is definitely a relative term

      If only I had known then what I know now
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    Three hours is an impressive amount of time in which to finish a Kindle book. It usually takes me a week or two to finish one, but I'm writing books that are longer than what you see on the Kindle on average. If you don't mind me asking, how many pages is the 3 hour book?

    Interesting case study. A person creating books in 3 hours could potentially upload 3 or more books a day. Upload 3 books a day for a year and you've got the potential for a decent income. It takes me 40 hours or more to write and upload a quality book that gets great reviews. The upside is I have a few books right now that are selling 50 to 60 copies a month and are bringing in more than $3 per book sold.
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      As I mentioned, this is one of my worst performing books. I write a range of different types of non-fiction, mostly focusing on how to guides, but also recipe books, childrens picture books and more.

      The way I write my books is much faster than most people simply because I keep all emails, blog posts and forum posts that I have written and store them in folders on my PC arranged by topic.

      Re-writing stuff you originally wrote for another purpose is very easy, and anything that you wrote which was not posted publically online (eg. emails) can be used verbatim.

      The length of your book depends on how you have set up your formatting. I tend to measure book length in number of words.

      Generally my basic kindle books are about 5,000 words, so with images, content, intro, etc, they are around 50 pages long if reading on a Kindle.

      The book in my case study was only 20 pages long.

      I have published on Kindle anywhere between 10 and 200 pages.

      The majority of my Kindle books are priced between $2.99 and $9.95.

      What I have noticed is that the length of a non-fiction Kindle book has almost no relevance to how much people are willing to pay, nor how well it sells.

      The first step of drafting my non-fiction Kindle books is always to ask myself "what will they gain by reading this?" From that throw together a rough outline (basically a contents page), then paste in any content or type up any notes I've made. The check I do when finished is to measure if the book delivers on what the reader should have gotten from it.

      For anyone having trouble converting their thoughts into writing, you can just use your mobile phone to record audio of you chatting about a topic, then have someone on Fiverr transcribe it for you. Generally 1 minute of audio translates to about 100 words. This can be a good way to get started.

      It is always faster to edit something than to start from a blank page, even if you end up completely re-writing it.

      As for time learning how to use Kindle... I also had to learn how to read and how to write... I don't factor in time that has been spent learning skills that I can use throughout the rest of my life.
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  • Profile picture of the author George Wright
    Hey JamieSEO,

    Nice post and very doable. It didn't take 40 hrs. to learn "Kindle" as one poster here suggested, did it?

    Also I like the idea that you researched and wrote the book.

    Nice going,

    George Wright
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by George Wright View Post

      Hey JamieSEO,

      Nice post and very doable. It didn't take 40 hrs. to learn "Kindle" as one poster here suggested, did it?

      Also I like the idea that you researched and wrote the book.

      Nice going,

      George Wright
      Hey George

      No - it did not take 40 hours to learn the basics of using Kindle. For my first book published on Kindle I spent about 15 hours learning.

      I DID spend more time after that learning more about how to improve
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  • Profile picture of the author Will Edwards
    Great post - right up there with the best on WF. Just shows what is possible on Kindle.

    Well done!

    Will
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  • Profile picture of the author latestnewsheadline
    Banned
    Nice post, good idea.
    Good luck !
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  • Profile picture of the author troy23
    Congratulations on what you did.
    I am about to publish my first one today.
    However I'm not sure it is a good idea to bang out 3 books a week, month etc.
    Surely it's better to provide value and quality to the audience than think about our pockets.
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    • Profile picture of the author jerryp
      Hi Jamie,

      That was an inspiring post and now I'm ready to hit it again. I've got 2 books on Kindle and they're not doing very well. However for the time I spent on them it's nice passive income as you explain. Thanks again,

      Jerry
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      • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
        Originally Posted by jerryp View Post

        Hi Jamie,

        That was an inspiring post and now I'm ready to hit it again. I've got 2 books on Kindle and they're not doing very well. However for the time I spent on them it's nice passive income as you explain. Thanks again,

        Jerry
        Hey Jerry

        There are lots of ways you can improve the performance of your Kindle books.

        As an example, from the split testing I have done:
        - Choosing the right keywords and optimising your title, description and tags makes a big difference
        - I found that having a good cover gave a 44% boost to sales
        - Getting a few (genuine) reviews also helps

        You are welcome to PM me with a link to one of your Kindle listings so I can take a look and give you some tips
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by troy23 View Post

      Congratulations on what you did.
      I am about to publish my first one today.
      However I'm not sure it is a good idea to bang out 3 books a week, month etc.
      Surely it's better to provide value and quality to the audience than think about our pockets.
      I would go completely insane if I spent all of my time doing the same thing over and over.

      Firstly, you want to choose a topic that you would be happy to spend at least 4 hours a week writing about.

      You COULD just write Kindle books, but I like to do other stuff as well.

      Set yourself an ongoing goal that you know you can achieve without going nuts.

      Your goal may be to get one new Kindle book done a month

      With this kind of passive income, you are the one controlling how much money you will make long-term. The more books you write, the more money you are likely to make.

      Feel free to PM me about your book and send a link to the listing - I'd be happy to check it out
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  • Profile picture of the author SerpPower
    kindle publishing is very powerful right now!
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  • Profile picture of the author Yogini
    Jamie,

    Good point about residual income. I have a few .99 kindle books and even with the .35 payments they do well. However, the 2.99 pricing makes the most sense. I also have found that the books lead to other revenue sources such as loyal blog readers and individual coaching. You can get additional exposure through itunes, barnes and nobles and other outlets by using smashwords.

    Debbie
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    • Profile picture of the author cashp0wer
      This is on my to do list after the first of the year. I have always wanted to get a book published on Kindle. I love your post - it gives me hope.
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      • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
        Originally Posted by cashp0wer View Post

        This is on my to do list after the first of the year. I have always wanted to get a book published on Kindle. I love your post - it gives me hope.
        Good luck
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by Yogini View Post

      Jamie,

      Good point about residual income. I have a few .99 kindle books and even with the .35 payments they do well. However, the 2.99 pricing makes the most sense. I also have found that the books lead to other revenue sources such as loyal blog readers and individual coaching. You can get additional exposure through itunes, barnes and nobles and other outlets by using smashwords.

      Debbie
      I experimented with different pricing and found that $2.99 is really the lowest worth charging for a book specifically written for Kindle.

      I tried out the 99 cent pricing, but found that it does not have a huge impact on sales, and I only got 1/2 the amount in royalties.

      You make a very good point about using Kindle to lead to other revenue. Many of the books I have published on Kindle had the primary goal of increasing my reputation about that topic, and often led to landing clients that were happy to spend thousands of dollars on my services since they could see I know what I'm talking about.

      I often publish on Kindle for Small Businesses that are trying to raise their profile in their industry
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  • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
    What about the time you spent thinking about what you wanted to write a book about and learning enough to be comfortable it wouldn't suck when you did it?

    Probably more than the 3 hours I imagine.
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

      What about the time you spent thinking about what you wanted to write a book about and learning enough to be comfortable it wouldn't suck when you did it?

      Probably more than the 3 hours I imagine.
      Write what you know.

      If you are not a rocket scientist, don't write about designing rockets.

      What do you know about already?
      - Do you know how to make meals on a tight budget?
      - Do you know how to stop bugs from devouring your roses?

      If you write about a topic you are already familiar with the words just flow.
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  • Profile picture of the author megansays
    I agree, Kindle is phenomenal. I suddenly had to stop writing when hubby went out of state and that residual income is now my primary income. So glad it's there.

    As for learning Kindle, write a document in Word with Header 1 as your chapter names. That's most of it. Doesn't take 40 hours to learn, doesn't take 4. You can learn everything you need from Amazon's help pages.

    And as for spending time learning about a book, start with books on topics you already know - passions, past jobs, interests, health conditions, etc. Get the ball rolling on books you don't have to spend a lot of time researching (some is essential for total value) and when you start seeing some returns, allow yourself the time to research to write about new ideas.

    Kindle is WELL worth it. I think it's probably one of the best options out there for getting your feet wet, and while some will say the market is becoming saturated, it's a HUGE market - there's room for all of us to play.
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by megansays View Post

      I agree, Kindle is phenomenal. I suddenly had to stop writing when hubby went out of state and that residual income is now my primary income. So glad it's there.

      As for learning Kindle, write a document in Word with Header 1 as your chapter names. That's most of it. Doesn't take 40 hours to learn, doesn't take 4. You can learn everything you need from Amazon's help pages.

      And as for spending time learning about a book, start with books on topics you already know - passions, past jobs, interests, health conditions, etc. Get the ball rolling on books you don't have to spend a lot of time researching (some is essential for total value) and when you start seeing some returns, allow yourself the time to research to write about new ideas.

      Kindle is WELL worth it. I think it's probably one of the best options out there for getting your feet wet, and while some will say the market is becoming saturated, it's a HUGE market - there's room for all of us to play.
      Great advice!
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  • Profile picture of the author dackers911
    Good post. Using KDP does the price have to be $2.99 to receive royalties? I have just published my first book under KDP at $5.99. Should I reduce the price?
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by dackers911 View Post

      Good post. Using KDP does the price have to be $2.99 to receive royalties? I have just published my first book under KDP at $5.99. Should I reduce the price?
      Pricing between $0.99 and $2.98, or over $9.99, only pays out 35% in royalties.

      Pricing between $2.99 and $9.99 pays out 70% in royalties.

      I recommend experimenting with different prices between $2.99 and $9.99 and see how it impacts on your sales.

      When setting pricing, I like to think about other impulse buys that people wouldn't even think about, and how much they tend to cost.

      For example:
      - A decent cup of coffee
      - Cup of coffee and a cake
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  • Nice share Very motivating!

    Working online defiantly beats most day jobs and this is the proof.
    You are making money now doing nothing which is fantastic.

    Kindle is something I have considered in the past but I will definatly give it a bit more of a forward way thought after reading you post. Thanks for sharing
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  • Profile picture of the author anwar001
    Nice to know that you are getting sales to your Kindle book. Did you get similar kind of success with more kindle books? I uploaded a couple of books on Kindle but couldn't manage that many sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by anwar001 View Post

      Nice to know that you are getting sales to your Kindle book. Did you get similar kind of success with more kindle books? I uploaded a couple of books on Kindle but couldn't manage that many sales.
      The book used in this case study is my worst performer. It makes the least number of sales out of all of my books.

      Different topics have different results, however the two most successful types of my books tend to be recipes and how-to guides about money.

      You are welcome to PM me a link to one of your listings and I would be happy to give you some tips on how you could boost sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    dackers911...If you're not getting many sales at the price point you're at, try reducing the price to see if your book starts selling. I usually start at $2.99 and bump the price up gradually until sales start to trickle off. Just recently I started bumping up some of the cheaper books I have that weren't seeing great sales just to see what happened. Strangely enough, some of them are selling better at the higher price point than they were at the lower price. An even stranger phenomena is they're getting better reviews at the higher price point, too. I'm thinking people who pay more for the book go in with high expectations and are happy when the book delivers. People who pay less go in with lower expectations and are tougher to please.

    Another tactic you can use is to lower your prices to $0.99 for a few days to kick-start sales and get a few reviews (hopefully good ones!). Once the sales start flowing in and you have some good reviews, move your price up to $2.99 and see if they continue at that level. Keep moving your price up until you find the price where sales are steady. In order to find the right price point for a book, you have to be willing to move it around to figure out what people are willing to pay.
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    • Profile picture of the author megansays
      Originally Posted by miklanderson2 View Post

      some of them are selling better at the higher price point than they were at the lower price. .
      I've seen this happen too. I upped a book by $1 and that month, it sold more than the previous two months combined.

      There are a few ways you can try to increase sales on those that aren't performing:
      • Experiment with the price. I try to leave it at least two weeks before making a decision on that price point.
      • Redo keyword research and make changes if you find better words, AND be sure to use all 7.
      • Change the cover. I get mine on Fiverr and am happy with the results.
      • Enroll in KDP and use the free promotion for one day (no need for more than 1) per month to up sales rank and get reviews.
      • Keyword optimize your description and improve your call to action.

      The "maintenance" takes only a few minutes per month to experiment with price points, keywords and descriptions, and slight tweaks can make all the difference in sales.
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      • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
        Originally Posted by megansays View Post

        I've seen this happen too. I upped a book by $1 and that month, it sold more than the previous two months combined.



        There are a few ways you can try to increase sales on those that aren't performing:
        • Experiment with the price. I try to leave it at least two weeks before making a decision on that price point.
        • Redo keyword research and make changes if you find better words, AND be sure to use all 7.
        • Change the cover. I get mine on Fiverr and am happy with the results.
        • Enroll in KDP and use the free promotion for one day (no need for more than 1) per month to up sales rank and get reviews.
        • Keyword optimize your description and improve your call to action.
        The "maintenance" takes only a few minutes per month to experiment with price points, keywords and descriptions, and slight tweaks can make all the difference in sales.
        Excellent tips!

        From split testing I found that having a decent cover tends to boost sales by about 44%
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  • Profile picture of the author dackers911
    megansays and miklanderson2 - thanks, great advice.
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    I agree that covers are definitely a big factor. If you've got a cover that looks like you made it in MS Paint using your feet, you're not going to have very many sales. I like to make my own covers and have found that some are winners and some are losers. When it comes to covers, keep it simple and make sure your cover looks good in the thumbnail that people see when they do a search in the Kindle marketplace. That's the first impression people get of your book. Use big text, clear pictures and white space to your advantage.

    It helps to remember that your book is going to be about the same thing as all of the other books on the page. Your title, your cover and the price are the only items people see when they search a topic. You have to sell people on clicking through to the details page based on these three things alone. Once they get there, your description needs to convince them to buy.

    You could have the best book in the world, but it isn't going to sell very well if you have an ugly cover. Look at what the best-sellers in your niche are doing regarding price, description and cover art. You might see some interesting trends you can use to your advantage.
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by miklanderson2 View Post

      I agree that covers are definitely a big factor. If you've got a cover that looks like you made it in MS Paint using your feet, you're not going to have very many sales. I like to make my own covers and have found that some are winners and some are losers. When it comes to covers, keep it simple and make sure your cover looks good in the thumbnail that people see when they do a search in the Kindle marketplace. That's the first impression people get of your book. Use big text, clear pictures and white space to your advantage.
      Miklanderson2 hit the nail on the head.

      When designing covers for Kindle, most people forget to check and see if it actually looks good as a thumbnail.

      To see if your cover will look good as a thumbnail, resize it to 115 pixels high.

      Overall I found that a decent cover made about 44% more sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author NickSway
    Very inspiring! I may have to read up on the kindle craze going on. Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author tjk1058
    And the best thing about this is that you COULD earn a lot higher then what was earned on this book.

    I'm in the fiction category and one of my books sold over 700 copies and I had it outsourced for $50. Now not all books sell that well but even if I sold a few copies per month I still consider each one a little ATM machine.

    I was struggling to make money online again until I started publishing on Kindle... it allows me to publish when I want and still earn a decent part-time income... did I say part-time income? Well as of this month I made more from Kindle then I did at my day job. If it wasn't for insurance I would probably quit and devote all my time to publishing!

    Just put one or two up as a test to see how well you can do and keep expanding!

    TedK
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    • Profile picture of the author JamieSEO
      Originally Posted by tjk1058 View Post

      And the best thing about this is that you COULD earn a lot higher then what was earned on this book.

      I'm in the fiction category and one of my books sold over 700 copies and I had it outsourced for $50. Now not all books sell that well but even if I sold a few copies per month I still consider each one a little ATM machine.

      I was struggling to make money online again until I started publishing on Kindle... it allows me to publish when I want and still earn a decent part-time income... did I say part-time income? Well as of this month I made more from Kindle then I did at my day job. If it wasn't for insurance I would probably quit and devote all my time to publishing!

      Just put one or two up as a test to see how well you can do and keep expanding!

      TedK
      Wow Ted!

      That's great!

      Personally I do not write fiction, though I do promote for some fiction authors.

      It would be excellent if you could PM me and we could set up a case study for one of your fiction Kindle books so people can see how they can still make money Kindle by outsourcing.
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