Who Says Email Marketing Is Dead?! Massive Sales Boost with this...

16 replies
Hey everyone..


Thought I'd share something that I did recently to massively increase sales with a simple email to my list.


If you've been involved with email marketing for any period of time then you know that cutting through the clutter of people's inboxes to get your message read is difficult at best.


I recently got engaged, like a week ago. So I thought I'd use my engagement to drum up a little interest by tying it into a sale.


My main blog is marketingfool.com but I run a membership site where I teach my unique adsense methods at insiders.marketingfool.com


Membership costs $27 a month, or $199 a year (I discount for a full year membership).


So what I did is create a massive sale. In effect I said "I just got engaged...and I want to buy a really awesome engagement ring for my girlfriend...so I'm slashing prices from $199 to $49 but only until I have enough to buy the ring".


You can read the entire email I sent out HERE


The response? It's been AMAZING. I'm looking at just over a 20% response rate and the sales are still trickling in.


YOU CAN DO THE SAME THING!


Sure, you aren't getting engaged, but you can find SOME significant event that's going on right now and craft a sale out of it.


The important thing is to make it relevant.


For instance, when I sold my Submission-Spider search engine submission software, I used to send out an email around x-mas time to people who had downloaded the free trial but didn't purchase.


The email said basically "It's x-mas and I want to buy lots of gifts for friends and family but I don't want to rack up credit card debt, so I've created a special offer of $X off the software if you order today".


It pulled like gang busters.


What special event can you use to create an email offer that pulls like crazy? Give it a try...
#boost #dead #email #marketing #massive #sales
  • Profile picture of the author chemo38
    Excellent tactic! Thanks for the share.

    Merry Xmas,

    chemo38
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  • Profile picture of the author mywebwork
    I received your mail John, congratulations on your engagement!

    Bill
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  • Profile picture of the author seriousjake
    Great idea for broadcast messages. I hope no one uses this tactic on their autoresponder LOL.
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  • Profile picture of the author Make Money Ninja
    Yeah thats a nice little angle. Congrats
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi marketingfool,

      There's nothing inherently wrong with this method, but at the same time I think it depends entirely on what type of business model you are pursuing.

      For example, you mention email marketing being 'dead' in your title and you follow up with explaining that you find it hard to get your emails read - therefore this method may be more appropriate in this circumstance.

      But it's also worth noting that there is a cost to this - if there wasn't, then every marketer would use this method with every email they send out - 'son's birthday sale', 'Aunt Mabel's coffee morning sale', 'Fred the pet lizard's sale to celebrate his new lizard tank arrival.'

      You can only do this so many times and you also have to consider how many others are doing the same. For example, look at High Street stores that have a seemingly permanent 'closing down' sale. Eventually they poison their own brand in the prospect's mind, they expect cheap items but consider the company to be unethical liars.

      Sometimes it's better to differentiate and simply offer damn good value as a rule but avoid making a song and dance about it (let the prospect come to the decision that it's a great deal by themselves) along with tenuous links with improbable events - not least because if others do it too, the prospect isn't always going to remember exactly who had which sale when. Instead they will just see a group of marketers who seem to be having far too many engagements and discount sales based on a plea for 'needing money' - which is incongruous with the rest of their 'I'm loaded' marketing messages.

      If you're having no trouble converting prospects into buyers anyway then it wouldn't automatically be wise to offer a heavy discount, when one isn't required.

      Going even deeper, it's better to keep marketing material focused on the prospect themselves, by using an event that's happening for them - 'Thanksgiving sale' or 'Christmas sale' as opposed to focusing on a happy event in your own life such as engagement or buying someone a present for Christmas.

      If you position yourself as successful and your market is likely to be less successful than yourself, but wanting to join you, psychologically you are creating resistance by talking about happy events in your own life and creating incongruence by mentioning that you don't have enough money to buy a ring in the first place.

      For clarity, I'm not criticising your valid points, but rather adding to them by looking at this from a different and possibly deeper perspective.

      In other words, if you are successful and sell memberships regularly anyway, is there an overall gain from doing this, or are you in fact losing out in some somewhat hidden areas purely to get an ego-boosting rush from a glut of discounted sales?

      Personally, I prefer to focus on differentiation every time and in most internet markets, it seems that people fail to properly consider whether there is actually an increase in profits in the long term from methods like this (rather than just a glut of sales which would have occurred organically over time anyway - at full price), they fail to consider any hidden cost or damage to credibility, they contribute to increased buyer weariness across the market from overused calls to action and they fail to see the incongruences because they are so focused on 'more quick sales' above all else that they forget to put themselves in the prospect's shoes.
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      Roger Davis

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      • Profile picture of the author CharlieMain
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        Hi marketingfool,
        But it's also worth noting that there is a cost to this - if there wasn't, then every marketer would use this method with every email they send out - 'son's birthday sale', 'Aunt Mabel's coffee morning sale', 'Fred the pet lizard's sale to celebrate his new lizard tank arrival.'
        I was just thinking how many times could I legitimately be engaged!

        Excellent points and thanks for reminder us that devaluing your product can sometimes speak volumes about your business.
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      • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        You can only do this so many times and you also have to consider how many others are doing the same. For example, look at High Street stores that have a seemingly permanent 'closing down' sale. Eventually they poison their own brand in the prospect's mind, they expect cheap items but consider the company to be unethical liars.
        It's not just on High Street. Seems most businesses here in the US have abused the hell out of this.

        Closing down
        Going out of business
        Liquidation sales
        Overstock inventory

        What they've all done is de-sensitize consumers much like the development of banner blindness 10 yrs ago. If people are like me, they ignore all the messages about "a sale" going on. They assume, like me, that the sales prices are regular prices. And they assume, like me, that all those businesses are basically lying to me.

        I heard an interesting little marketing report just before Thanksgiving. This was on the radio. Some enterprising company performed some research about Black Friday sales. The day after Thanksgiving shopping day.

        There was some hefty percentage of businesses advertising Black Friday "specials" with prices that were the same advertised all throughout the year. Nothing special, no real discount, etc.
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        • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
          Originally Posted by KenThompson View Post

          It's not just on High Street. Seems most businesses here in the US have abused the hell out of this.

          Closing down
          Going out of business
          Liquidation sales
          Overstock inventory

          What they've all done is de-sensitize consumers much like the development of banner blindness 10 yrs ago. If people are like me, they ignore all the messages about "a sale" going on. They assume, like me, that the sales prices are regular prices. And they assume, like me, that all those businesses are basically lying to me.

          I heard an interesting little marketing report just before Thanksgiving. This was on the radio. Some enterprising company performed some research about Black Friday sales. The day after Thanksgiving shopping day.

          There was some hefty percentage of businesses advertising Black Friday "specials" with prices that were the same advertised all throughout the year. Nothing special, no real discount, etc.
          Yeah but sometimes the sales are legitimate. A local store had like a 12 gig digital camera on sale Black Friday for $89 and change. I decided I was not standing in line for it. Went the next Monday and the freaking thing was $129.

          Since I needed the camera for some offline to online deals I have going I spent the $129 lol.
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      • Profile picture of the author Marketing Fool
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        Hi marketingfool,

        In other words, if you are successful and sell memberships regularly anyway, is there an overall gain from doing this, or are you in fact losing out in some somewhat hidden areas purely to get an ego-boosting rush from a glut of discounted sales?

        Personally, I prefer to focus on differentiation every time and in most internet markets, it seems that people fail to properly consider whether there is actually an increase in profits in the long term from methods like this (rather than just a glut of sales which would have occurred organically over time anyway - at full price), they fail to consider any hidden cost or damage to credibility, they contribute to increased buyer weariness across the market from overused calls to action and they fail to see the incongruences because they are so focused on 'more quick sales' above all else that they forget to put themselves in the prospect's shoes.
        Every successful marketer knows and understands their market. You know where the room is to offer a deal like this without diluting your brand or potential sales.

        For instance, I know that people generally sign up for membership for 2-3 months before getting bored and cancelling. That's $27 a month time 2 or 3 ($54 t0 $81). So offering a "Discount" of $49 isn't "losing" business. In fact, it's gaining business.

        Why?

        Because when someone signs up for membership and then cancels three months later, I lose them. With a $49 membership for life, they stick around and I can market other products and services to them in the future.

        I think you're looking far too deep into this. You will simply never dilute your market by occasionally offering a sale like this. Especially, like I said, if it's a valid reason.

        Sure, if you do it every other week and make up dumb things like barry the turtle's birthday sale you can do damage...but I think people realize that's NOT what I did or suggested doing.

        Speaking to your point of just offering good products or services...Email marketing is unique, it has unique problems and obstacles to overcome that have NOTHING to do with how GOOD your product is.

        Things like spam filters, people getting overloaded with a barrage of daily email where yours gets lost in the shuffle, list burn out and churn, and on and on.

        You could be giving away free gold bars, and you're still only going to get an X max open rate for your email.

        Anything you can do to increase those numbers is GOOD...and when someone finds something that's proven to work...well, I guess you could choose to pick it apart and try to convince people it's a bad idea as you seem to be doing. But me, I'd rather just run with it...
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        • Profile picture of the author ExRat
          Hi marketingfool,

          Thanks for replying. They are all good counter points that you make and yes, I was going a little deep into it there. I wasn't trying to pick it apart as such, but I was aware that it might come across that way. I learn from these discussions, sometimes by presenting a different perspective and observing what the response is. Thanks again for taking the time to respond and for creating the discussion in the first place.
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          Roger Davis

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  • Profile picture of the author Shaolinsteve
    Very nice insight and thanks for sharing.

    I do think ExRat has some very valuable responses to this also.
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  • Profile picture of the author Young Financier
    The person(s) who declares something dead usually has something to sell you.
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  • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
    Thank you for this wonderful tip! Sometimes a small tweak here and there can have a big result
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    Hi John,

    Great tip by the way.

    Congrats on your engagement.
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  • Profile picture of the author Majin
    Who Says Email Marketing Is Dead?! hmm Nobody ? haha

    Thanks for the tip.
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    • Profile picture of the author Marketing Fool
      Originally Posted by Majin View Post

      Who Says Email Marketing Is Dead?! hmm Nobody ? haha

      Thanks for the tip.


      LOL ha... yeah every now and then you hear people complaining here that email marketing doesn't work anymore... :-p clearly they're wrong!
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      Learn to CODE at Codemy.com - It's Pretty Awesome!
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