difference between a low, mid & high ticket product? Your response?

by blackhawkup Banned 13 replies
I figured this might become a very helpful thread for warriors of all levels.

What type of products/offers would you consider low level? mid level? high ticket?

This of course is in regards to information marketing.
#main internet marketing discussion forum #difference #high #low #mid #product #response #ticket
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  • Profile picture of the author WFAlex
    What kind of answer are you looking for? Ebooks = low level, audio = mid level, video/physical courses = high level? Please clarify.
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    • Profile picture of the author blackhawkup
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      Originally Posted by WFAlex View Post

      What kind of answer are you looking for? Ebooks = low level, audio = mid level, video/physical courses = high level? Please clarify.
      Yes, I guess just what you consider to be a low level/low priced offering--mid level/mid priced offering--high level/high priced offering.

      For instance I was told that the more expensive(high priced offerings)the offering the more personal contact is expected i.e one on one coaching.

      This was really meant to be food for thought and to get various points of views.
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      • Profile picture of the author WFAlex
        Originally Posted by Rich Jackson View Post

        For instance I was told that the more expensive(high priced offerings)the offering the more personal contact is expected i.e one on one coaching.
        On the other hand, I heard and read that clients that are able to afford such high ticket items are usually a lot easier to deal with than those that cringe about a $7. So for the seller, he gets to make more money from clients with deep pockets, while still not having to work his ass off since most of the clients will be easy going? That would sound like win-win
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  • Profile picture of the author butters
    Low level = Old/useless information (Done by clueless idiots)

    Medium level = Kind of useful information but missing parts (Done by someone who slapped up a few blogs, read a few books, claim to be good but know very little)

    High level = Useful information which is actually good and useful (Someone who has been in the industry for years and know what the hell they are talking about)

    Difference between each level is price .
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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    Originally Posted by Rich Jackson View Post

    What type of products/offers would you consider low level? mid level? high ticket?
    It's very subjective and niche-dependent, isn't it? From my own experience and perspective I instinctively think of "low level" as up to $97/$99, and "high ticket" as $997+, so I suppose that means I think of "medium level" as anything in-between.

    I'm looking at it in terms of price rather than product-types.

    I think anything over about $200/$300 is more difficult for an affiliate to sell as a "first sale". But clearly there are exceptions to that: if you're looking at residential courses, for example (and they're "information marketing" too), even the baseline's going to be about $500+.
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    • Profile picture of the author blackhawkup
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      Originally Posted by WFAlex View Post

      On the other hand, I heard and read that clients that are able to afford such high ticket items are usually a lot easier to deal with than those that cringe about a $7. So for the seller, he gets to make more money from clients with deep pockets, while still not having to work his ass off since most of the clients will be easy going? That would sound like win-win
      That makes a lot of sense. In my {limited} comparison my conversion rate doesnt drop much when the price increases. But I guess those 47 dollar products have their place

      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      It's very subjective and niche-dependent, isn't it? From my own experience and perspective I instinctively think of "low level" as up to $97/$99, and "high ticket" as $997+, so I suppose that means I think of "medium level" as anything in-between.

      I'm looking at it in terms of price rather than product-types.

      I think anything over about $200/$300 is more difficult for an affiliate to sell as a "first sale". But clearly there are exceptions to that: if you're looking at residential courses, for example (and they're "information marketing" too), even the baseline's going to be about $500+.
      Thank you for that. very detailed and insightful.
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  • Profile picture of the author martimoney
    To me the difference is in the value of the product. My low level products are usually a single strategy or solution to a problem the customer is trying to solve. The mid ticket tackles the problem with several solutions and/or a solution to a couple of different problems. The high ticket offers the most value.
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  • Profile picture of the author techbul
    High-ticket products are usually the ones that offer the most value, but I've seen really high value products on Warrior Forum that sell for much cheaper then I would expect.
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    • Profile picture of the author raffman999
      If you're talking about affiliate programs there are some real high ticket ones like private jet rental, yacht rental and medical tourism.

      Mid-ticket would be things like Forex programs and low ticket things like WSOs.

      Hope this helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sushiman1111
    With IM stuff I think that I rate products on a "how much is this going to make me" scale more than anything. Most plug-ins, for example, are considered low level products when you look at the price (WSOs are usually in the under-$20 range, but even on regular websites plug-ins generally only go up to about fifty bucks). But I've used some that have made me over $100/week for several weeks running, and I would have paid somewhere around a hundred dollars for it and still counted it a good investment. So the earning potential makes it more medium to high IMO.

    I can't imagine paying thousands of dollars for an online product though, no matter what the guarantee. Just me personally; I know others who have paid that and been happy with the results.
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  • The difference is perceived value and the glossy wrap up, not necessarily the content.
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  • Profile picture of the author paul nicholls
    a low ticket product is something under around $37

    a medium ticket is anything up to around $500

    a high ticket is anything from $500 and above

    these are just a guide and opinions may vary and also prices may also vary depending what niche
    you are in too
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill Hugall
    I decide the value based on the information. If the info will just help get someones feet wet. Low value. Scale it up from there.
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