Am I The Only One Who Thinks This Way?

33 replies
Okay, so I just wanted to get everyone's opinion on something.

I hate hype and I'm very skeptical. I am pretty sure a lot of other people are too, especially if they have been scammed or ripped off in the past, right?

I tend to avoid things that seem overly hyped up and unrealistic. As the old saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true then it probably is.

I realized that I am actually more likely to go for something if it sounds LESS amazing and MORE realistic. Like I'd actually be more inclined to click on something that promised to show me how I could make $1,000 a month than something promising $10,000 per month.

Not because I want less money, but because I know that if everyone could make that much in a month just by buying a single product then everyone would save up and buy the damned thing.

What do you guys think? I don't see very many marketers using this "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactic much at all...I think it could be very effective.
#thinks
  • Profile picture of the author jamescanz
    Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

    What do you guys think? I don't see very many marketers using this "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactic much at all...I think it could be very effective.
    I agree, but never wondered why marketers don't use it.

    For the simple fact that they sell more.

    For example, take any fitness magazine. If they don't over hype the headlines, heck, people aren't even going to pick it up, let alone buy it.

    Just think, if someone had a really big weight loss problem, what do you think would be more catchy to them?

    Something over-hyped like:

    "Lose 30 pounds doing absolutely NOTHING in 4 weeks while eating cakes, chocolate, and donuts all day"

    or

    "Lose weight slowly but surely"
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    • Profile picture of the author Holmstrom
      jamescants! Yes, you are absolutely right. This example what you wrote...its called copywriting
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    • Profile picture of the author ashloren
      Originally Posted by jamescanz View Post

      I agree, but never wondered why marketers don't use it.

      For the simple fact that they sell more.

      For example, take any fitness magazine. If they don't over hype the headlines, heck, people aren't even going to pick it up, let alone buy it.

      Just think, if someone had a really big weight loss problem, what do you think would be more catchy to them?

      Something over-hyped like:

      "Lose 30 pounds doing absolutely NOTHING in 4 weeks while eating cakes, chocolate, and donuts all day"

      or

      "Lose weight slowly but surely"
      I could see the hype angle for something like celebrity gossip, but honestly...I'd be more likely to pick up the weight loss mag that said slowly but surely, because I would never believe the first title was possible. I'd dismiss it as bull shit immediately.
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      • Profile picture of the author PerformanceMan
        Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

        I could see the hype angle for something like celebrity gossip, but honestly...I'd be more likely to pick up the weight loss mag that said slowly but surely, because I would never believe the first title was possible. I'd dismiss it as bull shit immediately.
        You have to learn to love the hype.

        Very few people think like us (I think like you.) We're not the vast majority of meat puppets who make up consumer society.

        The average meat puppet LOVES hype. The want the newest, fastest, easiest, guaranteed way of doing things. You have to give them what they want!
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    • Profile picture of the author SunilTanna
      Originally Posted by jamescanz View Post

      "Lose 30 pounds doing absolutely NOTHING in 4 weeks while eating cakes, chocolate, and donuts all day"

      or

      "Lose weight slowly but surely"
      This is one close to my heart, as I've just finished writing a Kindle book about weight loss.

      The reason why the first one sells better than the second, may well be because it doesn't work.

      If you buy a weight loss guide, and it doesn't work, what you gonna do? Most likely buy another one. Then another one. Then another one. Gradually work through the seemingly easy solutions, or at least blame yourself for not following them.

      On the other hand, if you actually have a realistic guide, and you get results, and you stick with it - you're probably never buy a 2nd one.
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      • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
        Originally Posted by SunilTanna View Post

        On the other hand, if you actually have a realistic guide, and you get results, and you stick with it - you're probably never buy a 2nd one.
        Sunil,

        If someone buys your guide and loses weight they then become a walking talking salesperson for your book - unpaid affiliates if you like.

        My wife followed a diet book that made her feel and look great. She's since got a few of her friends to buy copies and bought 5 copies herself to give as gifts.

        I also find that people who buy a book that helps them to improve their lives then buy a lot more books in the personal development/health niche. They're like "Wow, I feel like I've just woken up after being asleep for years - I must study more of this stuff!!"

        Martin
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        • Profile picture of the author SunilTanna
          Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

          Sunil,

          If someone buys your guide and loses weight they then become a walking talking salesperson for your book - unpaid affiliates if you like.
          I absolutely agree.

          Besides which, I would not feel comfortable selling crap. I believe what I talk about in my book absolutely does work --- I know: it worked for me. I lost around 70 pounds, and have kept them off, and am fitter and healthier than I think I have ever been.

          BUT: What I am trying to explain is why the marketplace as a whole is full of crap. The reality is that the way the marketplace works, encourages a lot of bottom-feeders who will sell any old garbage, and can make profits selling different varieties of garbage again and again.

          Yes, of course there are many good vendors and products too - I aim to be one of those!
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  • Profile picture of the author rendell
    It's because we are realistic and logical beings. So if it sounds too good to be true ... our "BS alarm" will start to ring.
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    .
    Ever notice that people who spend money on WSO, memberships and courses, are always complaining about being broke and not making any money ?

    They should have bought ASSETS instead.

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  • Profile picture of the author MaxNiche
    Over hyping is found all over the internet and used in every business online.It is a matter of getting the attention.But once you read the sales page,you can easily find it out if it is genuine or not.
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  • Profile picture of the author vikashmunda
    Banned
    Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

    I tend to avoid things that seem overly hyped up and unrealistic. As the old saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true then it probably is.
    You are not alone with this even i don't believe in anything which are over hyped which looks more like scam then legitimate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Yogini
    I also don't like hype and when the amount is so high that someone earned, it doesn't make sense to me that they'd sell a 7.00 ebook. In terms of huge weight loss stories, wrinkle removal creams or similar claims, I also am very skeptical. I am much more interested in someone's blog journal that records their progress over a longer period of time than any quick fix offer.

    Debbie
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  • Profile picture of the author IMWarlock
    From my point of view, people who are caught by these hypes tend to be complete newbies and very greedy ones. And since there are a lot of WSO's and MMO products in general, they think it's pretty easy and they jump into the hype. Those who buy those products usually don't think rationally and their greed is buying. That's basically why most of people never take action on those methods either because it involves actual work or they're just procrastinating and buying another "magic push button - make gazillion dollars per day doing absolutely nothing".

    From another point of view, marketers say that because you either potentially can make those mentioned $10k a month or they made it themselves and they show how THEY MADE IT and HOW YOU MIGHT or MIGHT NOT make it. So I wouldn't call hype everything that is sold. I don't however like those general reviews and testimonials where people either say how product itself is well written etc. Or they say good things because they know each other and that might be handy in the future. This is more hype to me than product itself. I find very few WSO's that has actual testimonial on how people made money with the method or did not etc.

    Just my opinion
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  • Profile picture of the author ExRat
    Hi ashloren,

    Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

    I don't see very many marketers using this "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactic much at all...I think it could be very effective.
    Some people swear by this approach.
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  • Profile picture of the author dedewiweka
    hey hey.... I do agree with your opinion. And Im using "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactic also in my Digital Product marketing strategi. I thing only someone who really less information will buy only 1 product priced $10 will be reach in a month ... hehehe (*this is my own opinion*)
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

    What do you guys think? I don't see very many marketers using this "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactic much at all...I think it could be very effective.
    I agree almost unreservedly with every word you said.

    I certainly find it very effective.

    I think there's a huge (perhaps slightly "upmarket demographic"?) "non-hype" potential market out there, in almost all niches, which many marketers are completely ignoring, perhaps partly with the belief that the market attracted to and sold by "hype" is the bigger one. And maybe it is the bigger one - but even if so, it's still the one that the overwhelming majority of marketers are chasing, and the "non-hype market" may still effectively be far less competitive. I've certainly been told by many affiliate customers, over the years, that they've bought through my link because I was the one who didn't sell aggressively or intrusively.
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  • Profile picture of the author fin
    Originally Posted by ashloren View Post


    Like I'd actually be more inclined to click on something that promised to show me how I could make $1,000 a month than something promising $10,000 per month.

    .
    It does work because it's what Ramit Sethi did with his product.
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  • Profile picture of the author funkynassau
    Ii agree with you. I dont click anything that offers me the moon for nothing. We worked hard to explain our product realistically and honestly because we prefer to be honest, and we didnt want to promise something we could not deliver. Our customers seem to appreciate that philosophy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Desi
      Overhyping does work. And the thing is, it's not lying. Watch infomercials. They show guys and gals with great bodies because they used "Super Ab Ripper Pro". In the very small tiny print at the bottom of the screen in white so it's hard to read, it says, "results not typical". It's hyped. But, possible.

      My feeling is that it's a formula that works...else, it would have died long ago. But as I wrote in a different thread...know your audience. It might work in the diet and MMO niche but may not in others.
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    • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
      Ashloren,

      You must have read my mind

      I was thinking of starting a thread titled " I Must Stop Thinking Like An IMer!!!"

      Yesterday, I was talking to my mentor (that ex rodent in post #11) about whether I should use different pen names for books in different genres.

      "Why?" he asks.

      And I rolled out all the usual IM arguments about using pen names.

      "Are you proud of your writing?" he asks.

      "Yes."

      "Do you hate your name?"

      "No."

      "If people buy a book in one genre and give you great feedback and recommend it to friends does it matter to you if they don't buy one of your books in another genre?"

      "Well, no . . . but . . . "

      Then the clincher:

      "Will setting up different pen names each with its own different social media accounts and marketing campaign distract you from your writing?"

      "Well, actually, it hasn't distracted me, it's given me a headache and blocked me."

      So, after the ExRat slap, I've stopped thinking like an IMer - I'm unblocked, writing like crazy and feeling very, very liberated.


      Martin
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      • Profile picture of the author mook
        I started a thread the other day on the same topic and the slippery slope that comes with it. I am trying to come to terms with that and decide on my own product. It is not easy.

        Not only will people buy heavy-hype over low-hype, but there is a palpable sense of an almost cult-like following backing marketers that work like that. I've learned they don't want to talk about it too much -lol.
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      • Profile picture of the author KevinDahlberg
        Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

        Ashloren,

        You must have read my mind

        I was thinking of starting a thread titled " I Must Stop Thinking Like An IMer!!!"

        Yesterday, I was talking to my mentor (that ex rodent in post #11) about whether I should use different pen names for books in different genres.

        "Why?" he asks.

        And I rolled out all the usual IM arguments about using pen names.

        "Are you proud of your writing?" he asks.

        "Yes."

        "Do you hate your name?"

        "No."

        "If people buy a book in one genre and give you great feedback and recommend it to friends does it matter to you if they don't buy one of your books in another genre?"

        "Well, no . . . but . . . "

        Then the clincher:

        "Will setting up different pen names each with its own different social media accounts and marketing campaign distract you from your writing?"

        "Well, actually, it hasn't distracted me, it's given me a headache and blocked me."

        So, after the ExRat slap, I've stopped thinking like an IMer - I'm unblocked, writing like crazy and feeling very, very liberated.


        Martin
        I've been wondering about this. Maybe it's just me wanting to be lazy, but having a pen name for everything is just a pain. It's kept me blocked as well. If I could like a post multiple times I would.

        Hype must work, or else people wouldn't be using it. I personally hate podcasts and videos. I've actually avoided products that have been in video format. I read much faster than I can watch. I do know that they must work, though, because people keep selling them.
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  • Profile picture of the author markcr
    Banned
    You'd think so wouldn't you? But it clearly works on the get rich quick crowd. I hate it as well. I cringe at it.
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  • Profile picture of the author markcr
    Banned
    Well it is designed to sell by not thinking too hard about the economics of it all.

    Not because I want less money, but because I know that if everyone could make that much in a month just by buying a single product then everyone would save up and buy the damned thing.
    It's s hame the desperate people are the most uneducated ones. I suppose there's a link there?
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      It's Sales 101; People buy on emotion and justify with logic.

      The overwhelming fact is that hype does work, but in niches crowded with hype, the "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactics can indeed be profoundly effective.

      These anti-hype tactics work essentially the same way as its antithesis - appealing to jaded emotions with the refreshingness of "honesty", "credibility", "integrity", "truth", "respect", etc.

      Honestly, I hope my competitors never do catch on.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jonathan Shearer
        As much as I hate to agree, it does work and continues to do so for a lot of people.
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        • Profile picture of the author icandi
          Originally Posted by Jonathan Shearer View Post

          As much as I hate to agree, it does work and continues to do so for a lot of people.

          I totally agree, if sales pages say it takes 10 hours per day and there's a steep learning curve, then no-one would buy. I've even bought one or two realistically written "earn $50-$100 on-line after reasonable amount of work" type offers and even they can be deceiving, I don't think that there is a truly guaranteed way to know in advance the good from the bad offers, it's always going to be a bit of a lottery (IMHO)
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

    I don't see very many marketers using this "anti-hype" or "realistic" tactic much at all...I think it could be very effective.
    You're not looking hard enough.

    I tell it how it is. I don't do long boring sales letters, I don't do squeeze pages, I don't do annoying popups, or promote crap. Infact, I don't even use automated emails, I only send real email messages.

    You're right though, there isn't enough of this in this industry, and it's a shame.
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    • I think there are skeptical people, fairly low key. Then there are the I'll-take-a-chance-on-anything types. Plus all along the spectrum in between.

      Different styles of marketing appeal to different potential customers. I suppose that's why testing out a marketing plan is so important. Also shows that more than one campaign for a single product can be a good idea.

      I'm on the low-key, sort of skeptical end. (Although maybe that doesn't apply to WSOs. Hmmm.)

      Mary
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      • Profile picture of the author cashp0wer
        I agree with you and I hate over-hyped stuff also. Once you read the sales page though you should see very quickly if it is a scam or not.
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  • Profile picture of the author HKSEO Jonbones
    A realistic promise of ROI I would say is far more likely to attract the right kind of clients.

    The first thing I think of when I see "Make 5000$ in your first week!" is scam. I don't even bother clicking to see what it's about, much less consider purchasing it.

    Some people like idiots for customers; I'd prefer the educated customer that gets the bigger picture. To each his own.
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  • I must admit I am now becoming quite immune to these over hyped headlines in sales pages and videos. I have been guilty of falling for a lot of them over the last 12 months and it's probably one of the reasons I'm not seeing much success.

    I guess it does come down to your market and who you are marketing to. I think for this industry to shake off its spammy and scammy stereotype is for us to be more realistic and more honest with our sales headlines.

    Honesty and helping people in this make money online niche is the fastest way to see success!
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  • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
    Hype is almost a must to get someone on your list. Once there it is time to deprogram the new member and teach them to use reason. I do not use near as much hype on the Warrior Forum because the membership has the opportunity to check me out before clicking.

    Outside of these hallowed walls there is a huge market seeing hype on every corner. That is your competition. AS ethical marketers we must learn to use hype but not lie.

    Troy
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    • Profile picture of the author Sandra Martinez
      I worked in a project were the lady was "hype" by nature. She was planning on getting into the IM niche, and wanted and anti-hype strategy. She thought it was disrespectful to use copywriting techniques in marketers, where everyone knew all about it.

      Funny enough, the first wso came and she did it in a very low key. People started to jump in telling her to shake a bit the sales page, because it was boring and just not her...

      Bottom line, I think that in this niche whatever the marketer wants to do in terms of pitch is ok to certain extent, BUT he/she has to be able to keep it in time and deliver over their promises.

      Now, there is a difference between hype and lies. Hype shouts out the quality of a product and its benefits. If you promise that 10K a month can be done, you need to show inside that it actually can be done.

      At this point, I feel almost past that as well... I donĀ“t care about the sales letter at all anymore. Usually when I get to a sales page I have already made up my mind.
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