Internet Marketing Lessons from the Kindle Gold Rush

by tpw
8 replies
Pretty soon, you're going to see sad and angry posts from writers who gave up everything and failed to make more than a few dollars for all their hard work. They followed all the rules. They posted their books as best they could, they Tweeted and Facebooked and blogged about their book until their fingers bled, they lowered the price to 99 cents, they made the book free for a week, they watched the bestseller lists and never ever ever saw their book on it.

They'll wake up, but they won't take responsibility for their own work. They'll claim that everyone lied. Joe Konrath lied. I lied. Dean Wesley Smith lied. We had fan bases that didn't take into account all the work a new writer has to do to succeed (because, y'know, we never were new writers, and never had to do any of that work, not once. We were grandfathered in or something).

And Amanda Hocking? She got lucky. Someone--the right someone--noticed her book. She wouldn't have had success otherwise (because, y'know, the fact that she's a marvelous storyteller who had written a dozen books means nothing).

And everyone else who succeeded? They were lucky too or had fan bases or made up their numbers.

Because those writers whose single book didn't succeed after they followed all the rules, well, they now know the truth. It wasn't as easy as it sounded to become a millionaire.

Those writers never realized that Joe and Dean and I were not talking about becoming millionaires or even about becoming famous. We were blogging about an industry in flux that was providing opportunities where those opportunities hadn't existed before. Those writers never realized that Amanda Hocking had an amazing amount of product up, and that product was so good that it attracted readers who then spread word of mouth about the books. Those writers never realized that book publishing--even e-book publishing--is a business like almost everything else in a capitalist society.

Excerpted from a much longer article at: KrisWrites.com



Excellent article...

I wanted to excerpt the article here, because it relates well to most "opportunities" inside of Internet Marketing, including even article marketing.

The three parts that hit me as the most true were these:

They'll wake up, but they won't take responsibility for their own work. They'll claim that everyone lied.
Because those writers whose single book didn't succeed after they followed all the rules, well, they now know the truth. It wasn't as easy as it sounded to become a millionaire.
Those writers never realized that Amanda Hocking had an amazing amount of product up, and that product was so good that it attracted readers who then spread word of mouth about the books.

People around these parts always question those who speak of how to be successful doing whatever...

And, if someone tries what is advised and they fail, they assume that the person who told them how to be successful lied.

As a writer, I know full well that some writers are just not going to succeed, for a variety of reasons, but foremost, because they did not win an audience.

Winning an audience begins and ends with having a great product.

No matter you cut it, a less than stellar product will fail of its own accord, simply because it failed to win an audience.



I have made a lot of money as a writer... But even I have had failures... I think most of us who have been successful have also failed with some of our products...

The difference I believe between those who succeeded and those who failed is that the successful took failure in stride and tried hard to reach further, and those who failed took their failure as proof that they had been lied to...

The successful thank those who have helped them to success, and the failures look for someone to blame when it all goes wrong...

Everyone fails sometimes... But those with character will turn failure into success...

In the end, success or failure will be a personal choice...

Will you make sure that your failures will serve as a stepping stone to your success?

Or, will you blame others for your misfortune and let your failures define who you are?
#gold #internet #kindle #lessons #marketing #rush
  • Profile picture of the author Paul Gram
    There are still many people who really do think they can just put a book up on the Kindle and get rich. It's crazy. You definitely need a great book(s), but also great branding and marketing behind it.

    I tell people all the time to look at Amanda Hocking. Many people consider her an overnight success but that is not true at all. You can go back and look at her blog and see that she posted to her blog 2-3 times per week for almost 3 years before she hit it big on the Kindle. She was building her author "brand" on her blog and social media and that is a huge part of her success.

    The good news is, success and even riches on the Kindle is still VERY possible, it just takes hard work and effort.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7476888].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
    No, it's all your fault for not buying all my books!
    Signature

    Dan's content is irregularly read by handfuls of people. Join the elite few by reading his blog: dcrBlogs.com, following him on Twitter: dcrTweets.com or reading his fiction: dcrWrites.com but NOT by Clicking Here!

    Dan also writes content for hire, but you can't afford him anyway.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7476893].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

      No, it's all your fault for not buying all my books!

      You can only blame me Dan, because I have only bought one copy of your book.... :p
      Signature
      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7476958].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TycoonRob
    I think if you put your heart and soul into writing a quality book, then your chances of success improve dramatically. Of course, we all think ours IS the best and it should be a NYT best seller, but sometimes it's just luck (timing, the right place at the right time, the right people saw it, etc) and sometimes it's a product of 20 things that worked together to make it happen. Just keep trying!
    Signature

    Doubt everything you believe.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7497421].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author chrisg942
    Booms right is all about quality! Ive done both I put on bad quality books a long time ago, and now I only submit quality stuff and I have a quite a large loyal readership group now.

    Chris
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7497442].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ocaswiz
    They’ll wake up, but they won’t take responsibility for their own work. They’ll claim that everyone lied.
    Thanks for this awesome quote.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7500372].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author J Bold
    I like this, Bill.

    You're just telling it how it is.

    Not, "Wowee, you too can be a millionaire if know how to turn on your computer!"

    People sometimes approach anything to do with making money from home or on the internet as some kind of magic potion. It's weird, but it does have that mystique.

    It's just the same as anything else in life. You generally are going to get out of what you put in. And, in the end, you are the only one responsible for success. Not tpw, not Donald Trump, not Oprah, not anyone.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7500515].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
      Bill,

      It's part of the desirable mindset that sees problems as opportunities (to develop yourself, to find a market etc).

      It reminds me of the story about new management changes at Mars UK. (Don't know if it's true but it's a great story).

      The directive came down from on high that, henceforth, the word "problem" did not exist in the sales force's vocabulary. It was to be replaced by the word "opportunity".

      One day, a salesman crashes his car. He phones his line manager.

      "Boss, I've got a problem . . . "

      "Stop right there!" Says the line manager. "Hang up, phone me right back and tell me you've got an opportunity."

      So, the salesman phones right back.

      "Boss, I've got an opportunity for a new car!!"


      Martin
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7501456].message }}

Trending Topics