Writing like an expert when your not?

111 replies
At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
#expert #writing
  • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    No, it's not OK to act like something you're not.

    If you're an expert, BE an expert.

    If you're not an expert, then you can't BE an expert.

    It's called authenticity.

    If you know the square root of feck all about a specific
    niche, then you can't in all honesty present yourself as
    an expert in it.

    Instead...

    Be what you are, not what you're not.

    Dedicated to mutual success,

    Shaun
    Signature

    .

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    • Profile picture of the author Tyler S
      Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

      No, it's not OK to act like something you're not.

      If you're an expert, BE an expert.

      If you're not an expert, then you can't BE an expert.

      It's called authenticity.

      If you know the square root of feck all about a specific
      niche, then you can't in all honesty present yourself as
      an expert in it.

      Instead...

      Be what you are, not what you're not.

      Dedicated to mutual success,

      Shaun
      Its too bad authority often comes before trustworthy relationship.
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    • Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

      No, it's not OK to act like something you're not.

      If you're an expert, BE an expert.

      If you're not an expert, then you can't BE an expert.

      It's called authenticity.

      If you know the square root of feck all about a specific
      niche, then you can't in all honesty present yourself as
      an expert in it.

      Instead...

      Be what you are, not what you're not.

      Dedicated to mutual success,

      Shaun
      I disagree. I have seen people who understand their niche poorly and blog about it make money, sell info. People who suck and are below par can blog, sell, consult etc..

      Just because some guy thinks everything should have a standard and wants to stop the ones who are not as talented or as good can take a hike.

      I'm for doing whatever you want and if you are not as good do your best with time and effort you will get better. I know one of the niches I got into I sucked at it the first 6 months I had tons of people tell me how and why I sucked at it, but kept at it and ignored them and later got really good.

      I'm getting in new niche now that I'm not as good what I'm suppose to not be able to write about it? How ridiculous is that.

      The bottom line is if someone has a passion for a niche just ignore the perfectionist and what what you want the best you can life is short if you listen to all the nitpickers you will never get anywhere.
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      soon people... Relax...
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by HelpingYouBeAnExpert View Post

        I disagree. I have seen people who understand their niche poorly and blog about it make money, sell info. People who suck and are below par can blog, sell, consult etc..

        Just because some guy thinks everything should have a standard and wants to stop the ones who are not as talented or as good can take a hike.

        I'm for doing whatever you want and if you are not as good do your best with time and effort you will get better. I know one of the niches I got into I sucked at it the first 6 months I had tons of people tell me how and why I sucked at it, but kept at it and ignored them and later got really good.

        I'm getting in new niche now that I'm not as good what I'm suppose to not be able to write about it? How ridiculous is that.

        The bottom line is if someone has a passion for a niche just ignore the perfectionist and what what you want the best you can life is short if you listen to all the nitpickers you will never get anywhere.
        Short version: Fake it until you make it, and screw the customer if you get it wrong. :rolleyes:
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      • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
        Originally Posted by HelpingYouBeAnExpert View Post


        I'm for doing whatever you want and if you are not as good do your best with time and effort you will get better. I know one of the niches I got into I sucked at it the first 6 months I had tons of people tell me how and why I sucked at it, but kept at it and ignored them and later got really good.
        Although there is much wrong in what you said, and John covered the most important aspect of what you said rather nicely, I have to comment on the quoted portion of your post above.

        You say that people pointed out to you why and how you sucked, but you just ignored them and later got better.

        Really? I find it hard to believe that you eventually got better without taking into consideration the advice you received.

        Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author Auzan
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by Auzan View Post

      Be expert and you will act like expert
      Yeah right, and I am daffy duck! I have known people that "act like experts", even SPEAKING, and they know NO more than they did when they started.

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author imfusa
    It's very simple, if you are not an expert, then become one and you MAY act as one.
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  • Profile picture of the author techbul
    If you have a website and you do thorough research on every article/guide you're writing, then there is no reason why you shouldn't position yourself as an expert.
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  • Profile picture of the author franamico
    Well, it depends on what your role as an internet marketer is.
    In my opinion, you don't need to be an expert to write articles and post them on your blog.
    Most successful websites (e.g, The Huffington Post) re-publish information.
    In other words, if you want to create a blog on, say, fishing and you know nothing about fishing, you can still do some research and completely rewrite other people's articles.

    Another option is to post a job on fiverr.com, elance etc...and ask people who are experts about your particular topic to write articles for your website...

    Again, if you are a marketer, your job is marketing. You must be an expert in marketing but you can't be an expert in each single topic...
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  • Profile picture of the author SurrealPSD
    The main area this concerns me is the medical niche.. I wonder how many peoples lives have been f*cked up by so-called 'experts' peddling dumbass solutions to potentially fatal illnesses..
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    • Profile picture of the author franamico
      Originally Posted by SurrealPSD View Post

      The main area this concerns me is the medical niche.. I wonder how many peoples lives have been f*cked up by so-called 'experts' peddling dumbass solutions to potentially fatal illnesses..
      Yes that is my concern as well. In that case, I would write information and provide references at the bottom. On top of that, adding a disclaimer saying that the site reports only opinions and not medical advice is usually the most common and safest solution.

      However, when building an authority site dealing with medical topics, always better to get professional legal advice.
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      • Profile picture of the author SurrealPSD
        Originally Posted by franamico View Post

        Yes that is my concern as well. In that case, I would write information and provide references at the bottom. On top of that, adding a disclaimer saying that the site reports only opinions and not medical advice would be adviced.
        ..Or how about not giving medical advice at all, if you're not qualified?
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        • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
          Originally Posted by SurrealPSD View Post

          ..Or how about not giving medical advice at all, if you're not qualified?
          Giving health advice is quite often giving opinion regardless of your qualifications. I totally get that it's a scary proposition that people might take bad advice with deadly or severe results.

          But it was "qualified" people; doctors, whose medical adviced killed my grandmother, and which advice was arguably tainted by the profit motive of the lucrative cancer industry.

          People ultimately have to rely on themselves to get information from many sources, with which to make their own health decisions. Expert or not, all medical advice ought to be given with disclaimers and perhaps the warning: "you are responsible for your own health, so seek all the information you can, use your common sense, and take your responsibility seriously; it is a fool who turns his or her life over to the doctor and says "fix me.""
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    • Profile picture of the author cooler1
      Originally Posted by SurrealPSD View Post

      The main area this concerns me is the medical niche.. I wonder how many peoples lives have been f*cked up by so-called 'experts' peddling dumbass solutions to potentially fatal illnesses..
      It's their fault really. If people are researching something serious as medical advice they should check the sources are legit before trying any solutions suggested.
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    • Profile picture of the author aarthielumalai
      Originally Posted by SurrealPSD View Post

      The main area this concerns me is the medical niche.. I wonder how many peoples lives have been f*cked up by so-called 'experts' peddling dumbass solutions to potentially fatal illnesses..
      Exactly! It's come to a point where even common people know that most of the information on the internet is false (my mother, who hardly knows how to operate a computer, said that internet is not a good place to look for health related information!).

      In my opinion, even if you don't know much about that subject, do enough research and check and cross-check if the information you have gathered is true or not. If you don't want to spend time doing that, then it's better if you hired a professional who actually knows what they are talking about, ESPECIALLY in the health niche. Writing false information or poorly researched information regarding health issues is completely unacceptable, in my opinion.
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    • Profile picture of the author ron34689
      Originally Posted by SurrealPSD View Post

      The main area this concerns me is the medical niche.. I wonder how many peoples lives have been f*cked up by so-called 'experts' peddling dumbass solutions to potentially fatal illnesses..
      I don't want to be rude,but if you have a fatal illness you shouldn't put much stock in to the internet...you need a real life doctor at a real life hospital and do what you can to learn from them. I do get what you talking about though and it's true that there is way to much bs and crap out there.
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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    On the Internet, perception is reality. This means as long as you can talk the talk it can often be enough to have people believe you are something you are not. It's scary but it's reality. This is why thousands of people get scammed everyday on the Internet. All you have to go by is someone's word.

    Case in point. I could be running a sole trader company by myself. I could create a nice corporate looking website and include images of a team of people that make it look like the company is much bigger than it actually is. So long as I give the perception of being a big company, that's all that matters.

    It's all about perception and that's why you need to be so careful.
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    • Profile picture of the author Todd Collins
      Originally Posted by WillR View Post

      On the Internet, perception is reality. This means as long as you can talk the talk it can often be enough to have people believe you are something you are not. It's scary but it's reality. This is why thousands of people get scammed everyday on the Internet. All you have to go by is someone's word.

      Case in point. I could be running a sole trader company by myself. I could create a nice corporate looking website and include images of a team of people that make it look like the company is much bigger than it actually is. So long as I give the perception of being a big company, that's all that matters.

      It's all about perception and that's why you need to be so careful.
      I got nothing to add here. Perfectly said.
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  • Profile picture of the author Monja
    it´s a question of ethic i guess. so anyone needs to decide for herself. still, as surrealpsd mentioned - what about giving medical advice if you are not qualified and something happens?
    so - i think it´s a no no. if you don't know, you should simply shut up. BUT you might want to check out a site from corbett bar, expertenough.com. i really like the site and it helps you to become an expert in anything you want without spending years to study.
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  • Profile picture of the author SasaIlic
    Don't act, become an expert. If you are really interested in that niche become an expert in it.

    Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    You virtually answered your own question when you said "we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about".

    Why would you want to develop such a site that makes readers think that of you?
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  • Profile picture of the author lezzur
    Anyone could claim to be an expert on anything on the internet. It's a matter of ethics. It's also a matter of business. Some people hire real experts so they may think that although they themselves are not the experts, the products or information they put out are from experts, so maybe then, their ethics takes a backseat for business sense.

    When I was only starting out on graphic design, I was clutching around the internet looking for articles, tips and really great techniques on how to make good designs look great. I think the first thing someone really looking for information notices is that at first you get some really great and cool tips. Then you start noticing that the really good information gets rehashed, spun, and all that.
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  • Profile picture of the author Monja
    the worst thing though is to claim yourself to be an expert and then you are not... imagine how much that hurts your brand... so best is always to figure things out before claiming yourself to be an expert.
    the other way is learning on the go and writing about that on your blog
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    Is it OK?

    That depends on two things...

    1) How much does it bother you that people who do know what they are talking about will think you're a joke, or worse?

    2) How much harm can you cause by having someone as ignorant as you are believe your horse manure?

    That's one reason I avoid medical topics more complicated than first aid. I have personal experience with things like treating moderate sunburn or removing a fish hook from my own or someone else's skin. Beyond that, I try to follow the "do no harm" dictum and keep my mouth shut.

    One problem with "finding an expert and just rewriting their stuff", beyond the legal implications, is that if you are ignorant in a subject, you could be choosing some jackass pretending to be an expert as your authority figure. You don't know what you don't know.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      "Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please."

      - Mark Twain
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      “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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      • You can present yourself honestly as someone who is researching information. It's a great way to get good content for a blog. By presenting yourself as someone who wants to find out more about a subject, you can interview experts in the field. So you're an expert-by-association, in a manner of speaking.

        I think there are way too many risks that come about because you say you know what you're talking about when you don't. It's not necessary to take that chance.

        Readers love to read about people like them, people in search of information (which is why they are at your blog in the first place, on a search for info). And they love even more the fact that you're doing the work for them. So you're like them, a big plus for a reader, and you're doing something for them for free, finding out more info on the subject. Great combination!

        Mary
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  • Profile picture of the author PunjabiYaaar
    I have also noticed it. I think there would be couple of reasons. Either they are not professional or they do not have any idea. I also noticed that some website owner usually hire some freelancers from different market place to write on those topics. Sometimes it works but maximum times it doesn't work.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    There are two types of writing that should be considered:

    1. Writing based on solid, good research;
    2. Writing based on self-experience.

    You can write with some authority by relying on the expertise of others in your "well-researched article"...

    When writing the "researched" article, you will NOT be claiming that YOU are the expert. Instead, you will reference others who are the experts, and you will still write with the authority of knowing that you will have gathered the best information on the subject.

    This is not a dishonest approach, so long as you are always honest with your readers about your role in communicating the information to the reader.

    Think about the news reporter who writes with authority, by relying on third-parties to bring expertise to the story being told.

    You should never claim that you are the expert, unless your expertise is based in experience.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      There are three types of writing that should be considered:

      1. Writing based on solid, good research;
      2. Writing based on self-experience.
      3. Writing based on correcting common misinformation.
      Fixed that for you.

      In some niches, ie medical, you really can be perceived as an "expert" by dismissing myths and granny tales through articles supported by authoritative references*.

      * "Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint."
      - Mark Twain
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    • Profile picture of the author buffnstuff
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      There are two types of writing that should be considered:

      1. Writing based on solid, good research;
      2. Writing based on self-experience.

      You can write with some authority by relying on the expertise of others in your "well-researched article"...

      When writing the "researched" article, you will NOT be claiming that YOU are the expert. Instead, you will reference others who are the experts, and you will still write with the authority of knowing that you will have gathered the best information on the subject.

      This is not a dishonest approach, so long as you are always honest with your readers about your role in communicating the information to the reader.

      Think about the news reporter who writes with authority, by relying on third-parties to bring expertise to the story being told.

      You should never claim that you are the expert, unless your expertise is based in experience.
      If this were Yahoo Answers I would vote the above as the BEST answer.
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  • Profile picture of the author emini_guy
    There are people out there who put out good content on their blogs who obviously are not experts and don't pretend to be, but they have done their research.

    You don't have to pretend to be an expert, but if you do your research your audience is more likely to trust you. You build trust by showing that you are not trying to mislead people. By pretending to be someone you are not you are doing the opposite.

    I like to promote or sell things that I am knowledgeable about. Otherwise, it's just a bad business practice, in my opinion.
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  • Profile picture of the author mohsinmallik
    There are thousands of bloggers around the web who are blogging in the niche on which they are not really expert. They get the latest news about their niche through different sources and they post those news on their blog in their own words. I personally do not think it is harmful for anyone.

    One thing can be told here for sure. Writing and reading so much about a niche will convert a novice to expert very soon.
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  • Profile picture of the author Magic Mike IM
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    If you don't know what you are talking about people who do will know.
    That's probably true, but what about the poor people who don't know, and are looking at this "so-called expert" for good advice...

    This brings me to a similar question... I see people on the forum giving very authoratative advice all the time... and I see people with amazing sig files, "learn how I make $300-$500 a day)... I wonder how many of those people actually have a high level of expertise in the particular area, of if they are just trying to act like it for the sake of trying to develop some credibility.

    How many people are giving advice and have not used it themselves, not made any substantial money on a regualr basis, or are simply repeating what they've read someplace else, but have no real experience... yet they act like it.

    Just a pet peeve of mine... everybody seems to be an expert... Yet my sense is that many people are just trying to "look good" so that they can be seen as an "expert".
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    • Profile picture of the author emini_guy
      Originally Posted by IM Guerillas View Post

      I wonder how many of those people actually have a high level of expertise in the particular area, of if they are just trying to act like it for the sake of trying to develop some credibility.
      That's not so hard to figure out. Experts show plenty of evidence in a number of ways and they have been around doing what they profess to be experts in for years and can document it. That's what it takes to become an expert. Years, and not weeks or even months and I am pretty amused by the people who say that a few weeks is enough to turn a novice into an expert. That is a myth that marketers love to propagate to feel better about themselves. It takes real time and focus to become an expert for most people.

      Another way to tell you are dealing with an expert and not just another marketer trying to pass as one is this: experts focus on one field and not many. I am not an expert on SEO, and I am not even an expert on marketing, but I consider myself an expert in what I have been doing for about a decade and marketing for about 7. I market mostly my own stuff, but also some Clickbank products in my day trading niche.
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      • Profile picture of the author Magic Mike IM
        Originally Posted by emini_guy View Post

        That's not so hard to figure out. Experts show plenty of evidence in a number of ways and they have been around doing what they profess to be experts in for years and can document it. That's what it takes to become an expert. Years, and not weeks or even months and I am pretty amused by the people who say that a few weeks is enough to turn a novice into an expert. That is a myth that marketers love to propagate to feel better about themselves. It takes real time and focus to become an expert for most people.

        Another way to tell you are dealing with an expert and not just another marketer trying to pass as one is this: experts focus on one field and not many. I am not an expert on SEO, and I am not even an expert on marketing, but I consider myself an expert in what I have been doing for about a decade and marketing for about 7. I market mostly my own stuff, but also some Clickbank products in my day trading niche.

        Excellent answers and tips. On forums like this, its just interesting that most everyone seems to come across as an "expert", when that is probably far from the truth.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by emini_guy View Post

    There are people out there who put out good content on their blogs who obviously are not experts and don't pretend to be, but they have done their research.

    You don't have to pretend to be an expert, but if you do your research your audience is more likely to trust you. You build trust by showing that you are not trying to mislead people. By pretending to be someone you are not you are doing the opposite.

    I like to promote or sell things that I am knowledgeable about. Otherwise, it's just a bad business practice, in my opinion.
    Presenting the results of good research transparently is a legitimate process I've used for years.

    There can also be a significant gap between 'knowledgeable' and 'expert'. There are many fields in which I consider myself knowledgeable enough to recognize true expertise and report it, but would never consider trying to pass myself off as the expert.

    Originally Posted by mohsinmallik View Post

    There are thousands of bloggers around the web who are blogging in the niche on which they are not really expert. They get the latest news about their niche through different sources and they post those news on their blog in their own words. I personally do not think it is harmful for anyone.
    How harmful something is depends on the subject, and how "really not expert" the given blogger is. Hence, my second question from my initial reply:

    How much harm can you do if someone accepts your flawed information as legitimate and acts on it? If it means they blow 2 hours on a bad movie or cook a lousy meal, that's one thing. If they fail to treat a disease or get into tax trouble that threatens their financial well-being is entirely different.

    Paraphrasing another poster above, "if they believe my crap, anything that happens to them is their own fault." There's a special spot by the fire for people like that. Does anyone truly believe that they can peddle anything they want, and if buyers don't spend the time and resources to recognize that the seller is full of shit they deserve whatever happens to them?

    Originally Posted by mohsinmallik View Post

    One thing can be told here for sure. Writing and reading so much about a niche will convert a novice to expert very soon.
    Depends a lot on how good the stuff you're reading and regurgitating is to start with. GIGO, after all.

    [GIGO = Garbage In, Garbage Out]
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  • Profile picture of the author TomYevsikov
    Basically, you can become an expert by doing your research or by actually doing what you're preaching.

    However, both business and love need a little hypocrisy to keep things going, and that's the truth.
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  • Profile picture of the author dvduval
    You BECOME an expert by writing on a topic over a period of time.
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    • Profile picture of the author danstairs
      This has been said before (even on these forums), but I'll say it again

      Anyone can be a genius, if they pick just one specific subject and study it diligently just 15 minutes each day." -- Albert Einstein

      On the other hand, I've been studying the weather all my life and I still get wet
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    • Profile picture of the author emini_guy
      Originally Posted by dvduval View Post

      You BECOME an expert by writing on a topic over a period of time.
      You can write about science all your life, but unless you are a practitioner in the field, that will never make you a scientist, but merely a science writer, perhaps even an expert on writing about science that even many a scientist may never become. But the real expert in a given scientific field is the scientist.

      Writing about something does not necessarily make you an expert in this field, especially if it is a field that requires years of education and a good deal of practice such as medicine or pharmacy or science, etc.

      Writing about something makes you a journalist or a writer, but that does not grant you the expert status in the field you are writing about. At least, that will never be true about many fields.

      Gary Taubes is a good science writer, but I don't think he has ever pretended to be a science expert per se because he simply knows what it takes to be a science expert. Being a good, original non-fiction writer that can communicate the topic well is enough of an accomplishment already.

      But I think in some fields such as nutrition that he writes about he is as good as many experts, and I pretty much consider him one. It took him years of active independent research to become an expert in this field and I think that you need to do more than writing to become recognized as a true expert just like him. Nutrition is not strictly science, though, or at least not very well established.

      Well, just my 2 "longish" cents.
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    • Profile picture of the author Micah Medina
      Originally Posted by dvduval View Post

      You BECOME an expert by writing on a topic over a period of time.
      Great news for my NFL career.
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      • Profile picture of the author ttenner
        Ofcourse you need to be an expert in order to educate people about that particular subject.

        1) What is the defintion of an expert?

        IMO this is someone who has acquired a comprehensive expertise and authoritave knowledge of the skill or subject/area.

        2) How do you become an expert?
        • Narrow your field of expertise, you cannot be an expert in everything, this is a fact of life. Just accept it. Once you have narrowed your field you can focus to acquire this expertise.
        • Apply your expertise in many different and similar situations
        • Sometimes you need to stop learning and teaching yourself - Just take action
        • Fail, fail and fail and learn from your mistakes.
        • Perhaps build a training module
        Only then you should write about your area, this certainly improves quality of your articles.

        NOTE: I never said I was an expert in documenting being an expert

        Thomas
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  • Profile picture of the author Confined To Life
    While I don't think it's politically right to act as though you're an expert when you're not, from a sales perspective, fewer people are going to buy products from those who aren't experts. I say fake it 'til you make it. (Y)
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    • Profile picture of the author Magic Mike IM
      This really is a complex issue... There is nothing wrong with self-promotion... but there is an ethics line somewhere that needs to be taken into consideration when you're giving advice as an expert to others who are depending on your answer.
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    • Profile picture of the author johndetlefs
      Originally Posted by Confined To Life View Post

      While I don't think it's politically right to act as though you're an expert when you're not, from a sales perspective, fewer people are going to buy products from those who aren't experts. I say fake it 'til you make it. (Y)
      I hate fake it until you make it.

      What's wrong with "work really hard until you actually make it, and then teach others how to if you really feel the need to"?

      (Not an attack on you Confined, you clearly said that you didn't think that it's politically correct!)

      "Fake it until you make it" is responsible for more bullish!t on the internet than anything else IMO.

      There is an astonishing amount of crap peddled on the net (and on the WF) by 'experts' who have purchased a couple of books or read a couple of ebooks, or just copied and pasted a couple of articles that they found on an e-zine somewhere...

      And it's not just on the net... the amount of trainers in Australia who sell themselves as business trainers who have never actually worked in or on a business a day in their lives is incredible.

      And don't get me started on politicians...

      *breathing slowly and deeply*

      I think things would be a lot better if people actually got good at stuff before teaching other people how to get good at stuff.

      Okay, rant over.
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      • Profile picture of the author Confined To Life
        Originally Posted by johndetlefs View Post

        I hate fake it until you make it.

        What's wrong with "work really hard until you actually make it, and then teach others how to if you really feel the need to"?

        (Not an attack on you Confined, you clearly said that you didn't think that it's politically correct!)

        "Fake it until you make it" is responsible for more bullish!t on the internet than anything else IMO.

        There is an astonishing amount of crap peddled on the net (and on the WF) by 'experts' who have purchased a couple of books or read a couple of ebooks, or just copied and pasted a couple of articles that they found on an e-zine somewhere...

        And it's not just on the net... the amount of trainers in Australia who sell themselves as business trainers who have never actually worked in or on a business a day in their lives is incredible.

        And don't get me started on politicians...

        *breathing slowly and deeply*

        I think things would be a lot better if people actually got good at stuff before teaching other people how to get good at stuff.

        Okay, rant over.
        Of course your content needs to be excellent. Just have the persona of 'expert' even when you're still intermediate. If you're making great, quality stuff, I don't see why you can't judge yourself as an expert.
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        • Profile picture of the author johndetlefs
          Originally Posted by Confined To Life View Post

          Of course your content needs to be excellent. Just have the persona of 'expert' even when you're still intermediate. If you're making great, quality stuff, I don't see why you can't judge yourself as an expert.
          So how do you know that you're making great, quality stuff, if you're not actually an expert?

          Not to be too facetious, but I think you get where I'm coming from?

          When I started out in business I was pretty sure that I knew everything. About 1 month later (and a month behind in rent) I figured out that I didn't know as much as I thought.

          If I'd written an article on how to run a business on day 10 (well researched of course! ) I would have been happy to say that I was an intermediate "expert".

          However I would have been full of crap!

          A couple of years later I thought that I had it all figured out, and skirted with disaster as I tried to scale a company that wasn't ready.

          The only true judge of an expert is by what you have actually done. I have learned more from my screw ups, than from all of the research that I have ever done, and I research like crazy.

          And you can only succeed or screw up by actually doing something, not researching it.

          And if you do research like crazy, then you are an expert in researching, and you can say that you have researched the information, and that everything that you've put on the page is from a third party, and that you've possibly drawn certain conclusions from it.

          IMO you are NOT qualified to call yourself an expert in something unless you actually have real life experience in doing it.

          IMO.
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      • Profile picture of the author writeaway
        Originally Posted by johndetlefs View Post

        I hate fake it until you make it.

        What's wrong with "work really hard until you actually make it, and then teach others how to if you really feel the need to"?

        (Not an attack on you Confined, you clearly said that you didn't think that it's politically correct!)

        "Fake it until you make it" is responsible for more bullish!t on the internet than anything else IMO.

        There is an astonishing amount of crap peddled on the net (and on the WF) by 'experts' who have purchased a couple of books or read a couple of ebooks, or just copied and pasted a couple of articles that they found on an e-zine somewhere...

        And it's not just on the net... the amount of trainers in Australia who sell themselves as business trainers who have never actually worked in or on a business a day in their lives is incredible.

        And don't get me started on politicians...

        *breathing slowly and deeply*

        I think things would be a lot better if people actually got good at stuff before teaching other people how to get good at stuff.

        Okay, rant over.
        I agree with you. It's all about PAYING YOUR DUES and working hard and putting in the time until the marketplace itself calls you an 'expert.' Marketing can only go so far. It's all about laying the groundwork for SOLID expertise. It doesn't come overnight and it truly is a reflection of a solid personal character.
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  • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
    I'm an expert at being me.
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    :)

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    • Profile picture of the author PayPower
      As long as you don't claim to be an expert when you're not, you will do fine. Provide honest information to the best of your ability. There are far more non-experts than experts out there but most of them provide really good, helpful information regarding the subject matter. Also a lot of writers "borrrow" information from "Experts" posts and change it around a bit. It's called Plagiarism. As other members have mentioned, it's about perception. Some non-experts want to be seen as experts. Quote "The secret to successful results is sincerity, and when you can fake sincerity, you have got it made" Amen
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  • Profile picture of the author OutsourceFactor
    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    I vote nay...It's still your credibility on the line and like you said, we can all tell that they're not so what's the point of claiming to be so? right?
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  • Profile picture of the author Gengis
    I guess this goes back to the old saying "Act as if" and many people act as if they are experts even when not.. Is it ok? Probably not but will people accept you if not?
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  • Profile picture of the author tenenali
    Indeed!

    They are right.

    You can never be an expert to a field you're not good at.

    First, Become an expert so you can act like one.

    If you'd like to be a good writer, then be a good reader first. Meet the prerequisites.
    Afterwards, become an expert writing your thoughts and ideas creatively from what you know.

    Goodluck mate!
    Tenenali
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  • Profile picture of the author ashloren
    My advice is to let your readers or your audience decide when you should be considered an expert.

    The best way to do this is to simply write what you KNOW from your own EXPERIENCE. Don't try to show people how to do something you have never actually done, instead show them how you were able to accomplish the things you have successfully achieved so far.

    That way, you avoid looking like an arrogant ass or just a plain old dumbass. And after you provide your audience with enough value over time, they will begin to regard you as an expert when you have earned that in their minds.

    Self-appointed experts are lame and oftentimes their own biggest fans.
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  • Profile picture of the author raffman999
    It really depends what you are writing about, who you are writing for and where your article or blog post will appear.

    For example, if you are selling a writing gig on Fiverr it's fine to write on any subject that you can provide a proper and full answer on if you research it properly. Proper research will allow you to write well on most topics; just avoid writing on a regulated activity like medical or legal advice.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chinedu Mmaduebo
    Most people do not have expertise in a particular niche but decide to write authoritatively on that because it is on the internet.The internet has provided the fastest means of sharing information and also the fastest means of defrauding the users too.
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    Nobody but just me.....

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  • Profile picture of the author ExRat
    Hi Tonylee93,

    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    It's up to you to decide whether you feel that it's OK or not, but if you are going to do it, don't do it like this -

    we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about
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    Roger Davis

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  • It all depends on your knowledge of a certain niche. If you are knowledgeable of one, then you have every right to act/speak like an expert. But if your expertise of a certain niche is equal to the amount of knowledge of a potato, then nope, you may not act as an expert.

    In all seriousness though, why should you "act" as an expert? Let your readers judge. Don't be conscious whether your article sounds "professional" or whatever. Just give your best shot.
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  • Profile picture of the author ashishthakkar
    Writing like an expert when your not?
    Writing like an expert when you're not?

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche
    their

    It is ok to be and write anything online, unless you are giving medical advice.
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  • Profile picture of the author markcr
    Banned
    How on earth can you "act like an expert" in a niche you know nothig about? What the hell are you doing in such a niche?
    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
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  • Profile picture of the author Make Money Ninja
    Fake it till you make it baby..

    Pretty sure all the "experts" around here dont make shizzle
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  • Profile picture of the author cmbwealth
    I see it as a process. I like to choose niches that I enjoy or that I want to learn more about. If I'm learning, I write (or at least try to) as an explorer of knowledge, as I uncover things or find something that really interests me I will research, I will add my own thoughts, I may simple explain in my own words what I discovered. It isn't about being an expert, it's about sharing knowledge.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bobby Zaman
    i wudn't put my cedibility in doubt if i wasn't sure about something
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Confined To Life View Post

      While I don't think it's politically right to act as though you're an expert when you're not, from a sales perspective, fewer people are going to buy products from those who aren't experts. I say fake it 'til you make it. (Y)
      Originally Posted by Make Money Ninja View Post

      Fake it till you make it baby..

      Pretty sure all the "experts" around here dont make shizzle
      Very productive thread - got to add a couple of names to my 'never buy from' list. Even if your output looks good, no one will know if it's part of the 'faked it' or the 'made it'...:rolleyes:

      Originally Posted by raffman999 View Post

      It really depends what you are writing about, who you are writing for and where your article or blog post will appear.

      For example, if you are selling a writing gig on Fiverr it's fine to write on any subject that you can provide a proper and full answer on if you research it properly. Proper research will allow you to write well on most topics; just avoid writing on a regulated activity like medical or legal advice.
      I've asked this so many times over the years that I'm starting to bore myself, but it needs to be asked again...

      If you don't know anything about the subject on which you are writing, how can you posibly know that the research you are doing is "proper"? How do you know you aren't taking well-written bullshit from someone like the two above, trying to fake it until they make it?
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      • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        If you don't know anything about the subject on which you are writing, how can you posibly know that the research you are doing is "proper"? How do you know you aren't taking well-written bullshit from someone like the two above, trying to fake it until they make it?
        I am thinking about that, too. I find the part of finding trustworthy authors the most time consuming (and nerve-wracking), at least when first starting out. It's easy to go over at Amazon, select the best sellers in the desired niche, and think the job is done - it's not that easy.

        Sometimes the true authorities, the true experts, are buried deep down under a pile of books that have only one good thing about them - great marketing. I am tempted to point to a very popular niche that fits this description, but given its popularity and even its presence on this very board, and many, many adepts, a hit-man would be hired to take me down.
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  • Profile picture of the author designitbuddy
    I will show my self as a new not expert. Because everyone here was new at time of entry to this market. With time to time one can learn more things and experience lead him to become an expert.
    So showing yourself as a expert when you are not, is not good.
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  • Profile picture of the author realc4ever
    it depends on what information you're wanting to share. if you are able to help the person (expert or not), they'll be satisfied with you. they may come back and see what else you have to say. especially if you're the only one saying something that isn't often heard.
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  • Profile picture of the author mountain vision
    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    If you are passionate about a certain niche and research heavily about that particular niche, you will certainly know a lot about that niche and be able to easily answer questions that come your way.

    That being said I'm not going to design and have a bridge built, something I would love to do. I really have a thing for bridges.

    That being said you can certainly research things you are passionate about and become quite knowledgable in that subject.
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  • Profile picture of the author andyredsox
    It's impossible to be like someone else who's not really you. People will notice for sure. Being real is the best key still. Learn how to be an expert and people will tell about it. It's just a matter of authenticity.
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  • Profile picture of the author JimDoyle
    If you are not an expert, then use Google to make you an expert. Whatever you are trying to be an expert at use Google to research everything you can about your subject. Then as long as you know more than most of your subscribers, you are then seen as an expert.
    However you have to take lots of notes so you can answer their emails. Youtube is another great way to find out about your subject. You can even send Youtube links to your subscribers to show them how to......
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    I Will learn a lot here. If you want to visit my website for more useful information. http://www.jamesdoyleonline.com

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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by JimDoyle View Post

      If you are not an expert, then use Google to make you an expert. Whatever you are trying to be an expert at use Google to research everything you can about your subject. Then as long as you know more than most of your subscribers, you are then seen as an expert.
      However you have to take lots of notes so you can answer their emails. Youtube is another great way to find out about your subject. You can even send Youtube links to your subscribers to show them how to......
      Jim, let me ask you this...

      If you don't know what you are talking about, and there are a lot of people online "faking it until they make it", how do you know that what you find in your Googling is truly expert content you can learn from and not something that only looks good to the uninformed?

      This isn't meant personally, more of a general question...

      If you don't know shit from shinola, how do you tell the difference?
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      • Profile picture of the author tpw
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        If you don't know what you are talking about, and there are a lot of people online "faking it until they make it", how do you know that what you find in your Googling is truly expert content you can learn from and not something that only looks good to the uninformed?

        This isn't meant personally, more of a general question...

        If you don't know shit from shinola, how do you tell the difference?

        To answer your question, you must always have some knowledge on the subject, in order to be able to determine WHO is worthy of your trust and confidence as reliable sources of information.

        Our readers will also convey trust and confidence to what we tell them, based on their belief as to our "grasp of the facts".

        I eventually quit writing medical information articles -- for fear of getting something wrong, but before I quit doing it, I relied heavily on government websites for my information. I spent an ungodly amount of time on the NIH and CDC .gov websites, simply because we cannot always trust what we find on .com websites.

        If your judgement as a writer/researcher is sound, then you will go out of your way to find the most reliable and trustworthy sources from which to grow your knowledge.



        Generally, when I create products, I follow a standard process for bringing that product to life.

        Even when I have background knowledge in the subject material, which I usually do, I do a lot of research and reading to determine the who the "real authorities" are in that niche, before I do my research.

        I will go through hundreds of websites to determine who I should be taking my advice. I will look heavily towards people that I find trustworthy to see who they recommend to others, and I will make a note of who is being recommended.

        If you listen to the people who actually do that type of work, you will soon pick up a list of a few dozen people and websites to which others attribute authority. (In my current project, my "authority list" contains 82 websites.)

        Once you have your list of trusted authorities -- people whom others deem trustworthy and reliable, you will know whose information is worth paying attention and whose words to take more seriously in our topic research.

        I will spend several days reading information related to my topic, from the perspective of the people whom I have already determined to be authorities in the niche.

        I will dive into my topic to get a comprehensive education on the subject from the perspective of the authority sources on my list, and I will add their knowledge and perspective to my own.

        Only when my research is completed will I feel comfortable enough to sit down to write.

        In my best products, you will conclude after reading that I know my stuff, in part because I have also introduced you to other authorities in the niche who agree with what I am sharing with you.



        Coming full circle...

        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        how do you know that what you find in your Googling is truly expert content you can learn from and not something that only looks good to the uninformed?

        If you don't know shit from shinola, how do you tell the difference?
        First you must determine who others consider to be the "authority", then you are well-prepared to do the kind of research that will help you produce the kind of content that others can trust to be accurate.
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Bill, that sure sounds like a lot more work than just reading the top 3 articles at EZA...

          Kidding aside, that's a terrific description, and a plan anyone with the patience and perseverance can follow to become an authority on any subject, even if they aren't an expert.

          Thanks for posting it.
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  • Profile picture of the author seapor
    Write about what you know. You would surprise of all the new people entering the IM world everyday that is looking for exactly what you were looking for. So go and learn all you can about your niche. Choose one thing, use it and learn it. Then write about your experience with it. If you attend a training Webinar, write about what your learned. Sharing your experience is authentic and you don't have be an expert to do that.
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    • Profile picture of the author RDInfo
      First you must determine who others consider to be the "authority", then you are well-prepared to do the kind of research that will help you produce the kind of content that others can trust to be accurate.
      What if the authorities just repeat information just because they have the same degree or are part of the same school of thought ?

      What is a degree ? The ability to repeat information, some being proven, some being unproven.

      Politicians, teachers, some scientists, repeat existing information some being proven by scientific tests and results and an objective interpretation of those results, but some parts of the information are just beliefs without any evidence to back it up. (See the HIV causes AIDS debate for example)



      I don't think anyone need to present himself as an expert, this is unecessary and pretentious.
      I think that to make a good infoproduct/book with interesting and useful concepts and solutions, one must first research the topic from the best known and trustworthy books, websites, but also from several scientific reports and from personal tests and results.
      Then you can present your information as the results of your research and experience, and the people interested in this subject will probably buy the product if it seems interesting enough, useful, and backed up by an objective interpretation of the results.

      Honestly when you understand how the politicians, the teachers, the journalists, the doctors, the pharmacists learn their "official" knowledge and skills you understand that there are marketing startegies and communication strategies and lobbying everywhere.

      The truth is backed up by facts/proofs and by an objective interpretation of these facts/proofs. Information is only a tool to communicate, you can't just read the top serps (often written by writers who repeat information without knowing what they are talking about) and create an infoproduct/book with this. Well you can, but it will be full of BS.

      What do you think happens when some scientists try to find proofs to confirm an hypothesis they have but their reasoning and their interpretation of the results is erroned ? A false belief is born !
      When others scientists use as a source a a wrong/erroned scientific report, then it is again more false interpretation and false beliefs "proven by science" that are spread. (See the placebo controversy papers for example)
      This is why the principles of objectivity and reproductibility are important.

      So i think that to use reliable sources of information and scientific reports is good, but never forget that in these sources there are some parts of repeated/false/erroned information.
      This is why being actually concerned by the problem and finding the usefull knowledge and using this knowledge to create/improve practical, efficient solutions is, i think, the best approach and will demonstrate your knowledge, skills, experience, techniques without having to use the word "expert".

      That's what i do, and i don't care about the competition, most of them repeat information without thinking or testing it.
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  • Profile picture of the author svsets10
    Interesting topic, I actually have been thinking about this for a few days and came on here this morning to create a post only to find it's been done!

    My question is this (and it comes mainly from my day job as a coach) Those of us that have an interest in sports know that there are VERY successful coaches that have never actually participated in the sport themselves.....yet they are an expert.

    Does being an expert require you to actually do what you are teaching? Or is having the skill of teaching information so that others can learn what qualifies you?

    Case in point, I was on a website about product creation and kept hearing the author state something like "You aren't doing anything unethical, you are rounding up information and presenting it to someone and people pay for the convenience of that."

    The only problem is that when that particular product is sold it is never mentioned that "I have never tried this and succeeded, I just gathered up all the information I found on the subject for you."

    At what point do we cross the line?

    I have never played women's lacrosse, but I have coached it and know enough of the game and the skills necessary to put together winning seasons. I am seen as an authority on the subject by athletes and parents and no one questions a thing.

    How does this become different in the IM niche?
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by svsets10 View Post

      I have never played women's lacrosse, but I have coached it and know enough of the game and the skills necessary to put together winning seasons. I am seen as an authority on the subject by athletes and parents and no one questions a thing.

      How does this become different in the IM niche?
      I think that part of the confusion comes from so many people using the words "expert" and "authority" interchangeably, when they are not the same thing.

      You may not be an "expert" at playing women's lacrosse, but your knowledge and experience in producing desirable results (winning seasons) does make you an expert at coaching women's lacrosse and an authority on the the game.

      I don't believe John Wooden ever played college basketball, yet he won more NCAA titles as a coach than anyone else in the history of the game.

      Was he an expert on playing college basketball? No, he was not.

      Was he an authority on college basketball? Obviously.

      Was he an expert on coaching college basketball? Check the record book...
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      • Profile picture of the author svsets10
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        I think that part of the confusion comes from so many people using the words "expert" and "authority" interchangeably, when they are not the same thing.

        You may not be an "expert" at playing women's lacrosse, but your knowledge and experience in producing desirable results (winning seasons) does make you an expert at coaching women's lacrosse and an authority on the the game.

        I don't believe John Wooden ever played college basketball, yet he won more NCAA titles as a coach than anyone else in the history of the game.

        Was he an expert on playing college basketball? No, he was not.

        Was he an authority on college basketball? Obviously.

        Was he an expert on coaching college basketball? Check the record book...
        Thanks for the reply!

        My question is this, if someone studies a method, completely studies it and knows all aspects of the method. For the sake of argument it's CPA and Youtube marketing. They have read all that there is to know about the subject and method but have never actually implemented the method..... Is it ethical to produce a product to teach others on the method?
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by svsets10 View Post

          Thanks for the reply!

          My question is this, if someone studies a method, completely studies it and knows all aspects of the method. For the sake of argument it's CPA and Youtube marketing. They have read all that there is to know about the subject and method but have never actually implemented the method..... Is it ethical to produce a product to teach others on the method?
          Is it ethical? In my mind, sure - as long as it isn't sold as the product of experience.

          If you say something like "based on hundreds of hours of study and research, these are the practices of the most successful people...", you should be fine. People know they're getting an academic study. Cite your sources, and interpret them all day long.

          Just don't lie to people. And that includes a "lie by omission" when someone fails to disclose that they have actually never done something, yet claim expertise or authority.
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  • Profile picture of the author evilsaigon
    I can agree with staying truthful, but you can't expect people to say on their blogs "I'm not an expert in this field, so don't take me too seriously." If the owner purchases articles from other expert writers, then...

    That is what the privacy policy, and disclaimer is for. Yes it can be a drag, and often treated as 'understood', but it is the responsibility of visitors to at least read through and be in agreement with the conditions that are listed clearly black-and-white if they want to follow the advices on the site.

    When people personally ask u for advice, and you are honestly not very experienced nor very sure of your own advice, well it is ethical to just outright say so, even though it's already supported by the disclaimer. The way you phrase yourself will matter quite a lot though!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by evilsaigon View Post

      I can agree with staying truthful, but you can't expect people to say on their blogs "I'm not an expert in this field, so don't take me too seriously." If the owner purchases articles from other expert writers, then...
      When it comes to affiliate bloggers and 'gurus-in-waiting' I don't expect much anymore, sad to say. Unless I have some other context to judge them on, I assume most of them are lying through their teeth about their level of expertise. Situational ethics has such a strong hold that I'm pleasantly shocked and amazed when I do come across someone playing it straight.

      The topic at hand was ethics, and I gave my view on the ethics of teaching a methodology based on academic study as opposed to direct experience.

      Oh, and purchasing content from 'expert writers' does not make the owner an expert. It makes him a content buyer.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        "To be a writer takes hard work, talent, and discipline. And that's why I just make up crap."
        - Colin Mochrie


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        “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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  • Profile picture of the author evilsaigon
    Edit: Sorry forum lagged... Double post.
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  • Profile picture of the author kimonerz
    The term fake it till you make it applies here.
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  • Profile picture of the author IanGreenwood
    IMHO experts walk the walk i.e. they live their subject! They write books, they read books, they attend conferences, they talk to others in the business, they engage in discussion... much like any other area of life.

    After 4 years full time at university and 25 years in practice I consider myself an expert in my branch of healthcare! Do you think this speaks to my clients? You bet it does!

    After 3 years part time at university and 10 years practice I consider myself to be somewhat an expert in multimedia computing and web development. Do you think this serves me well in IM? Of course it does.

    If you want to sit in front of the TV and then sell products online about something you know nothing about, then can you pass yourself off as an expert? Probably, for a short time, but you can't fool all the people all the time, and it's no basis for a consistent long term business!

    To reach the top with the serious marketers then you need to play the game as a serious player. You need the right resources, and you need to invest in the right services, education and traffic. In other words you need to take the actions that result in success!

    Every time you do something that's a bit more difficult, you will leave more and more of your competition behind and add to your expertise. Every time you do something that takes a bit more knowledge or skill, the crowd thins out a little and you become more knowledgeable.

    Every time you do something that takes a bit more time or work, you'll find the path a little less crowded and you'll become better known and more like an expert!

    There are no short cuts, as much as we would like them. Everything worth having is worth working for - including a reputation as an expert.
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  • Profile picture of the author Backlinko
    Expertise comes from DOING.

    The best articles are from people that are in the trenches, working in that field.

    I'll take an poorly-written article from a dentist with 35-years of experience over some re-written Ezine article any day of the week.
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  • Profile picture of the author SirStanley
    Yes, depends what subject you are writing on. I think you can tell a mile off when someone is not an expert in their field.

    But I think it's ok if you do a lot of research and learn to become an expert, but obviously if it is in the health market, for instance, then you have to be very careful.

    You have to realise that you are talking to real people who are taking your advice at face value sometimes.

    Always be honest and give people value for money
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  • Profile picture of the author Beverley Boorer
    You don't always have to write like an expert to be successful. Sometimes telling it how it is for you, and telling people you are not an expert but this has been your experience is even better. People can then tell you are being authentic and will empathise with you since they also have had the experience of trying something out but not being an expert in it. People like to know when others make mistakes and how they learn from it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Corey Geer
    Originally Posted by Tonylee93 View Post

    At many times I've seen other bloggers write as if they are an expert in there niche. But we can all tell that they don't really know what they are talking about. I wanted to know is it ok to act like an expert when you really don't know much about that specific niche?
    It's called salesman and selling. You are who you tell your customers that you are.

    A lot of the IM Gurus were told they were marketing masterminds long before they actually were.

    A lot of people on here I'm sure will flame this but "fake it till you make it" is a legit strategy that a lot of people on the internet do and more often than not, it works out for them as long as they're actually being productive and not pretending they're someone else on the forums.

    A lot of people tend to stick around forums 24/7 rather than actually working on what they tell people they do.

    As far as being "wrong" to lie to get a sale that I'm sure some people mentioned... that's business whether it's good business or not, that's how business works.

    If you think the Gurus selling you crap they don't even use are deceitful, you should see behind the scenes of corporations and how they market their products and appeal to their audience...
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Corey Geer View Post

      It's called salesman and selling. You are who you tell your customers that you are.

      A lot of the IM Gurus were told they were marketing masterminds long before they actually were.

      A lot of people on here I'm sure will flame this but "fake it till you make it" is a legit strategy that a lot of people on the internet do and more often than not, it works out for them as long as they're actually being productive and not pretending they're someone else on the forums.

      A lot of people tend to stick around forums 24/7 rather than actually working on what they tell people they do.

      As far as being "wrong" to lie to get a sale that I'm sure some people mentioned... that's business whether it's good business or not, that's how business works.

      If you think the Gurus selling you crap they don't even use are deceitful, you should see behind the scenes of corporations and how they market their products and appeal to their audience...
      Corey, under this post, your sig reads:

      Need High QUALITY And Unique Content Creation? From Now Until 2013, Just .03c Per Word!
      Can you tell me how anyone is supposed to know that you can really provide "high quality and unique content" or whether you are simply selling and telling people what you want them to think? Based on someone only reading this, how likely are they to believe you aren't just hanging out in the forum, 'faking it until you make it'?

      I'm not making any accusations or aspersions, as I've never used your services. But you have to wonder - how many prospects did you lose with this post?
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        A lot of people on here I'm sure will flame this but "fake it till you make it" is a legit strategy that a lot of people on the internet do and more often than not, it works out for them as long as they're actually being productive and not pretending they're someone else on the forums.
        I prefer learn it till you earn it as a strategy. I've become an "expert writer" in several niches because clients hired me to write on those topics. Learning/researching/examining the subject is part of writing about it to me. That's why I don't take on projects in niches I find boring:p

        1. Writing based on solid, good research;
        2. Writing based on self-experience.

        You can write with some authority by relying on the expertise of others in your "well-researched article"...
        What Bill said...
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  • Profile picture of the author Sam Mann
    If your trying to BECOME AN AUTHORITY IN THAT NICHE... then there are much better ways to do that. The best way is to BRAND your self well so you can build great credibility just like guys like Brad Gosse, Chris Munch etc.

    You can fake anything online but it won't last for long.

    My 2c..
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  • Profile picture of the author moreno
    Do your search and learn , outsource , become an expert....
    Frank Moreno
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  • Profile picture of the author feedthegoats
    Copying other people's ideas and saying they are your own is plagiarism. It's okay to use other people's ideas if you identify the source of information and give it credit. But pretending to be an expert is nothing more than deception - probably just trying to make a buck without doing the work.
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  • Profile picture of the author jjarrett
    If you want to be an expert on a particular topic, then do it. One of the best things you can do is get at least three books on the topic you are interested in and read them all. You'll know more than most on the topic, but even better, you'll decide if you're really interested in the topic at all.

    I've read so much and so widely, there's just a lot of stuff these days that I just don't waste my time on. I'd rather read fiction. However, I do try to stay abreast of internet marketing, and I like to read stuff about relationships and health because those are two areas of my life I want to improve.

    Any particular topic you are interested in? Maybe I can recommend something. Reading has always been an escape for me. BTW, you can find plenty of Kindle titles on Amazon for free.

    Good luck,

    Jinger
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by jjarrett View Post

      Any particular topic you are interested in? Maybe I can recommend something. Reading has always been an escape for me. BTW, you can find plenty of Kindle titles on Amazon for free.

      Good luck,

      Jinger
      Good tip, but you have to exercise the same caution with books on Kindle that you need for any other source, including self-published physical books. It's unfortunate, but just because something is available on Kindle (or Amazon proper, for that matter) doesn't guarantee that it's authoritative - or even accurate. The barrier to entry is just too low...
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  • Profile picture of the author vijai
    You can Hire the Expert to do so
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  • Profile picture of the author Danielle Lynn
    Focus on delivering value to your customer base. If you had a problem that you wanted the solution to, and you came across an IMer's "faked crap from google help site" I don't think you'd be running to get your credit card.

    Focus on actually delivering useful info by doing research (not just google searches, I mean getting out there in the field.) If you can't, do what others suggested and outsource it to people who ARE experts.

    Stop pumping the internet with crap It's already brimming.
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  • Profile picture of the author PrestonPilgrim
    You cant fake it till you make it
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    • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
      Originally Posted by PrestonPilgrim View Post

      You cant fake it till you make it
      Unless you're an aspiring actor.
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      :)

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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by mojojuju View Post

        Unless you're an aspiring actor.
        And then, if you land on the casting couch, you may have to fake it while you make it... :p
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  • Profile picture of the author rmolina88
    I don't consider myself an expert by any means since there's a bazillion methods, but I'm at least knowledgeable at what I do.
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  • Profile picture of the author HJ8282
    I believe just reading other websites in your niche really helps out, you can learn a lot and usually improve on their content...
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  • Profile picture of the author JasonBennet
    There is so much information that is available on the internet that anyone can become an expert if he is willing to spend the time to learn. I personally would choose a topic where I have interest in so that it will not be boring for me. No one started out as an expert as everyone started from scratch. Just my 2 cents.
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  • Profile picture of the author ReferralCandy
    There are many ways to skin this cat.

    Is it okay- okay for who? For the non-expert writer? For his reputation? For his writing career? For his sales? For the marketplace?

    It's "okay" in the sense that you're not going to go to jail for it. You might even get some sales. It's not okay to me, because it's deceitful and a waste of space. It depends on your priorities and what you're trying to achieve.

    Also, what does it mean to be an expert? To have a proven track record of being able to make something happen? To be able to speak the language? To be knowledgeable? To know some facts and figures?

    Here's my perspective- don't pretend to be somebody you're not, don't pretend to be an expert or an authority if you're not. Explore your curiosity instead. Ask questions. Have discussions. Over time, you'll develop a more informed opinion and be able to communicate that value to others.

    Please don't mislead people. It might be "okay" to do so, and you might even make a little money from it, but ugh. Know yourself, know your limitations, and be diligent. Even if your goal is to make money, in the long run you'd make a lot more if you focus on helping people instead of trying to inflate your own worth.

    Hope that was somehow helpful. Cheers.
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  • Profile picture of the author mannagr1
    I believe it's ok so long as you give quality content, the give credit to where credit is due in terms of your source(s)
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  • Profile picture of the author carlamae
    I feel like if you really don't know what you are talking about it will shine through and you will be wasting your time. To get some quick content on your site, you could add links from the broader experts in your niche and write a little paragraph about each one. Let them know you have spotlighted their article on your blog and perhaps you will get some guest bloggers in the future too. Always think of the future with every contact...k, I'm getting off topic, sorry! lol All the best to you.
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