Have you been homeless and pulled yourself up?

38 replies
I'm curious if there are Warriors or have friends who have experienced a literal rags to riches chapter in their life.

How did you pull yourself up to sustainability after having nothing?
#bootstrapped #homeless #pulled #rags to riches
  • Profile picture of the author LWYSIWYG
    Originally Posted by Workman View Post

    How did you pull yourself up to sustainability after having nothing?
    I made the decision to change things. I was broke, homeless and living in my Jeep or spending a couple nights here and there on friend's couches.

    I did everything I could, I focused on strengths and even took a few chances, and it paid off. I actually had to learn as I went, which took some doing but I managed to start making enough to pay for some rooms at different Extended Stay hotels. Nothing super fancy but it was way better than my Jeep or a lumpy couch!

    Once I started making the money a lot of stress and heartache started to go away, which made it much easier (and much more fun) to continue making money and scaling everything up.

    I'm also a STRONG believer in the Law of Attraction. If you dwell on hard times and are constantly upset by them, angered by them or whatever emotion they are envoking in you, then all you are doing is bringing more reasons for you to feel this way. More situations, people etc.

    Turn it around, be grateful for everything you DO have, look towards the future as if you are already there and feel that joy. Then you are bringing more situations, people and circumstances to you that will make you grateful and happy etc.

    More simply put, change the way you think - you change your life.
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  • Profile picture of the author mattjay
    I had a friend die back in 1998 end ended up homeless in the end of that year. Went from sleeping in a car, to a shelter. It's funny how things end up being blessings. Met up with a friend I met in a bowling alley about 3 months earlier. He gave me a job at a pizza place, and let me pay rent at his house for about a month. Then I got my own place. Had a number of jobs over that time period, and eventually discovered internet marketing in 2008. I believe i was being watched out for in a number of ways on my roughest days, and simply believed I had something better in store, and a few years later things started falling into place.

    I did a lot myself but had a lot of help on the way along also. I am recently a survivor of a health scare and take each day as it comes. I try not to sweat the small stuff, remembering back to when I slept in a car!

    My Father has told me a few times, today is the first day in the rest of your life. I take those words seriously everyday.

    ^^^thanks for your inspirational post.

    Great thread. I'm aware of a few warriors who are rags to riches stories, hopefully they post their thoughts here. I'm not rich by any stretch, but I was able to quit the last few hours of my job in November, and it's the best decision I ever made.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nicole K
    This thread has some good real life stories that we can all learn from. I have never been in rags but I can appreciate those who have been able to pull themselves up from rags to riches.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gaz Cooper
    Before I started Diving and IM, as a young lad I was homeless living in my bright yellow Triumph dolomite in Birmingham in the UK and I can still remember vividly having just 2 pounds and pondering what to spend it on the choice was bag of Chips (french fries to you yanks ) I was hungry, or 2 pounds worth of Petrol so when i woke up in the night freezing i could start the car and use the heater for a bit to warm up the car. I CHOSE THE PETROL

    I remember not knowing what to do I have a friend still to this day that allowed me to occasionally sleep in a old empty house and I remember wondering how the hell to get out of this situation ALL I KNEW WAS i wanted out of the UK too cold and prospects at the time were bleak,

    The best thing I can say is you have to want to change your life and I had a BURNING DESIRE to leave for sunny horizens but absolutely no way of doing it but it was burnt into my subconscious mind.

    I believe VERY STRONGLY in the subconscious mind its very powerful and if you have something burnt into it and you want it bad enough it will happen.

    I eventually saw an ad in the local paper for a timeshare company that was offering a month in the Canary Islands with training and a months free accommodation so I had nothing to lose i would get at the least a month in the sun.

    All i had to do was get a bit of money together for spending so i sold my home (my Triumph Dolomite for 300 pounds (yes it was a banger ) and headed out to the Canary Islands and that was the start of my 27 years of travelling around the world, (currently living in Thailand) the rest of the story is too long but in answer to those who may be in the same position

    You must have a burning desire to change and have goals no matter how small and think about what you want and put it into your subconscious mind because that will subconsciouly be looking for what you have put there.

    Stay positive and remember with a positive mental attitude and a burning desire nothing is impossible.

    Gaz Cooper
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    • Profile picture of the author mpluto
      Originally Posted by Gaz Cooper View Post


      I believe VERY STRONGLY in the subconscious mind its very powerful and if you have something burnt into it and you want it bad enough it will happen.

      Gaz Cooper
      For sure. It is your best friend or worst enemy. Getting certified soon to become a Life Coach working with all 3 selves: Conscious, Subconscious and Higher Self.
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    • Profile picture of the author Workman
      Originally Posted by Gaz Cooper View Post

      I was hungry, or 2 pounds worth of Petrol so when i woke up in the night freezing i could start the car and use the heater for a bit to warm up the car. I CHOSE THE PETROL
      Oh wow, down to your last bit of cash and went with fuel... That's intense.

      Originally Posted by Gaz Cooper View Post

      and that was the start of my 27 years of travelling around the world, (currently living in Thailand) the rest of the story is too long but in answer to those who may be in the same position.

      You must have a burning desire to change and have goals no matter how small and think about what you want and put it into your subconscious mind because that will subconsciouly be looking for what you have put there.
      Sounds like you're living a dream now! How do you know it's time to pack up and move again? Do you go off of opportunity or do you have an idea of where you want to go next and make it happen?
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  • Profile picture of the author mydream247
    My mom passed away when I was 17, I left Chicago and moved to Houston to get away from gangs I had become involved with. Stayed with my sister who shortly after moving here choose her boyfriend over her brother, so found myself homeless sleeping on park bench in Herman park for over six months and eating out of garbage cans in back of restaurants dumpsters, moved to shelter and meet one of the smartest man I have ever known a homeless man named Walter, he was also talking about an idea for a safety device that would prevent semi trucks from swaying during bad weather, fast forward few years he sold his idea for 1.2 mil to venture capital company who patent his idea and made millions. He taught me to never give up on your dream, I am not rich now and I am still struggling but I will never give up, I have a bed to sleep in, roof over my head, no gangs shooting tame, and not running from police I have made it, and will some day be the success my mom wanted me to be, I owe my loving and supportive wife, kids and grand kids my success.
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  • Being homeless and broke is awesome - You can only go up!
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Ashwood
      Originally Posted by Resale Rights Ninja View Post

      Being homeless and broke is awesome - You can only go up!
      You've obviously never been either!
      Try it first, before you make smart remarks.
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      Now where did I put that pencil?

      Time for a cuppa.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sue McDonald
    I have never been homeless but I have been broke and in debt... very broke. I used to try and live on $20 a week and that included petrol for my car but that situation only lasted about 10 months but that was enough

    During that time I gave up smoking because I couldn't afford to smoke and eat and I chose eating.
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  • Profile picture of the author burnz720
    2 years ago I had no job and moved into my parents house and slept on their floor of a room. I was reading the bible a lot so I prayed and fasted before starting my business. 3 months later I was making about $500 a day. By the end of the year I made 300,000 and it all got stolen by a random guy I got involved with because I thought I needed him because I didnt know anything about business. So I let gim take care of the funds. So I was broke again because I was letting him keep all the money in his business bank account.
    I left him in January 1, 2012
    So its been a little over 2 years and ill probably make at least a million this year.
    The crazy part is I give away most of my money and get stolen from alot (I trust everyone too much) but somehow I keep increasing. I just apply biblical principles to my business and it works. Gods wisdom beats mans wisdom. I can attest to that. I could hardly pass highschool HA!
    Everyone makes fun of the way I do business too because I always do it with a handshake. So I probably get cheated on average at least 10, 000 a month...who cares though.
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    • Profile picture of the author Workman
      Oh wow, I'm struck by the honesty and desire to succeed evident in each of your responses. Thanks so much for sharing your stories.

      Originally Posted by LWYSIWYG View Post

      I'm also a STRONG believer in the Law of Attraction.
      ...
      Turn it around, be grateful for everything you DO have, look towards the future as if you are already there and feel that joy. Then you are bringing more situations, people and circumstances to you that will make you grateful and happy etc.

      More simply put, change the way you think - you change your life.
      It's difficult to look for the right opportunities if your mind isn't on the right channel. Negative thoughts and circumstances begets more negative situations. Thanks for sharing your experience

      Originally Posted by mattjay View Post

      I did a lot myself but had a lot of help on the way along also. I am recently a survivor of a health scare and take each day as it comes. I try not to sweat the small stuff, remembering back to when I slept in a car!

      My Father has told me a few times, today is the first day in the rest of your life. I take those words seriously everyday.
      Sounds like you have some good friends and great people around you =] Thanks for sharing!

      Originally Posted by mattjay View Post

      Great thread. I'm aware of a few warriors who are rags to riches stories, hopefully they post their thoughts here. I'm not rich by any stretch, but I was able to quit the last few hours of my job in November, and it's the best decision I ever made.
      I asked the question because it occurred to me that every other push-button software pitch video seemed to tell a rags to riches story, but know that there are very real success stories out there of people like you bootstrapping themselves and building their future from nothing.
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  • Profile picture of the author JasonBennet
    My situation is not as bad as some of the Warriors as I am still working in a job. Although I am still working on my business time, I still like to read this kind of Rag to Riches to story as it really motivates me to keep on going. Great sharing by some of the people in this thread.
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  • Profile picture of the author PrestonPilgrim
    I have never been homeless... but I have went through some tuff times.

    I think the reason there are so many homeless success stories is because they are in the situation were they have to DO OR DIE.

    ... When you have a mentality like that then you are most likely going to succeed. This is why being homeless can be an advantage
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  • Profile picture of the author x Travis Ingram
    Sometimes I wish I could feel what it is like to be homeless or in debt, for sure it would get me going on an IM'ing career path. Thanks to many of you who could share you stories, really motivates me
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    • Profile picture of the author GeroC
      Originally Posted by Azon TJ View Post

      Sometimes I wish I could feel what it is like to be homeless
      WOW it is -38 in MTL with the wind-chill right now and I am sure that many homeless people would wish nothing more to be not sleeping outside almost freezing to death, and you wish you could feel what it is like?
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      Time To Take Action !!!

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    • Profile picture of the author Beatrice
      Originally Posted by Pro TJ View Post

      Sometimes I wish I could feel what it is like to be homeless or in debt
      ...be careful what you wish for...:rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author owenlee
    When you are at this stage, your motivation level need to be supper high to overcome the situation..

    One thing for sure is since you are at the bottom you will tend to try many things and not afraid of failure..
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  • Profile picture of the author TheDavid8
    On an episode of shark tank, there was an African-American couple of whom went whom being homeless, to becoming very successful. Their product was a fitness DVD. Braydon had to follow up with them in order to close the deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author nicholasb
    yes I was literally homeless before and not just for a few nights, pretty much my entire teens were spent homeless, and some of my adult years.

    Now I live a very comfortable life, and it all came from working to acquire specialized knowledge all self taught, putting those skills to work, and making things happen.

    Never making excuses and having a serious drive to succeed no matter what.
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    • Profile picture of the author Greg71
      I've never had to sleep outside, but have been down to the clothes I had on, plus one tshirt.

      It came down to changing who I associated with. I'm not where I want to be, some 15 years later, but I'm doing better than I was.
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  • Profile picture of the author danfac2012
    When you have nothing to lose you have everything to gain!
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  • Profile picture of the author Coby
    There was a point in my life where I was sleeping in my car (was a ford explorer at the time)...

    For me, it was a combination of depression, bad luck and trying to escape an abusive relationship...

    On the plus side - I also stopped smoking during this time since I couldn't afford cigarettes.

    I wish I could say that I got out of the situation by finding internet marketing, but it would be another 2 or 3 years before that happened.

    I ended up moving in with my grandma for a few months and getting a job as the front desk clerk of a Holiday Inn and went back to college...

    After moving out of my grandma's but still working and going to college I ended up in Florida for spring break and met my now long time girlfriend. After meeting her I soon moved to Tennessee (where she lived) and about a year later started my IM business...

    So, I guess everything happens for a reason - but it's up to us to pick ourselves up and keep trying or to "suck it up" and do things we don't want to (like move in with our grandma)...

    Cheers,
    Coby
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    I have never been in rags where I had to live on the street thanks to great parents and a great family.

    I know of some people who used to live in their cars/vans and have a lot of success online now. I hear of stories of people who were drug addicts and homeless and are now living the internet lifestyle.

    2 of those guys are David Wood and David Sharpe. If you really look into their back ground and how they are doing really well online by now, it is pretty amazing.

    Everyone who succeeds online has many issues before they got started. They fail a lot even when they try to succeed. They face many setbacks along the way. Those who persist, eventually make it.
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  • Profile picture of the author FirstSocialApps
    I wasnt homeless but when I was younger I did live in a boarding house (1 dump of a room with a shared bathroom down the hall), and ate ramen noodle soups and hot dogs for supper just about every night.
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  • Profile picture of the author cynthiaSEL
    Originally Posted by Workman View Post

    I'm curious if there are Warriors or have friends who have experienced a literal rags to riches chapter in their life.

    How did you pull yourself up to sustainability after having nothing?

    Making a plan, working the plan, focusing on the positive (GRATITUDE!) and living in prayer.
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    By the way, do you want to learn how to get over your fears so that you can accomplish your dreams? If so, do this exercise How to Get Over Your Fears so that You Can Accomplish Your Dreams

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  • Profile picture of the author betterwtveter
    I got a buddy who is a writer and never gave up with it. He slept on a couch at he brothers house and kept writing. He finally did well cracking a deal with a magazine company and now he is making a nice living
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  • Profile picture of the author Workman
    Stumbled across the comments on Y-combinator news on a guy who owns very few physical items and was particularly moved by this commenter (shanelja):
    I moved countries 9 months ago, I had only £600 in my pocket, nowhere to stay, no job and no real qualifications. When I moved, I couldn't afford an expensive flight so I had to cut down to 1 suitcase and 1 backpack and whatever else I could stuff in my pocket.
    I was terrified, I had a very slim chance of actual survival (enough people die of being homeless, not being able to afford food, etc, to make it a real cause for concern, I've seen it myself) and I was young, I had only just turned 19.
    My family lived in Spain and I had no choice but to move there when I was 16, but I had taught myself programming and I had a dream, one which I couldn't see being achieved in Spain, so I moved back to the UK.
    When my plane touched ground, I bought a cheap SIM card and put it in to my Nokia 3310 (Retro chic, right?) and sent a text to my girlfriend to let her know I had landed and everything was okay, she lived in the UK (still with her parents) but I couldn't afford to send a text to my family, it would be weeks before my mum knew I was safe.
    I took a train journey from Manchester airport to Blackburn, it was where I was born and where my girlfriend lived, it would be a good idea to start there. As I sat on the train I contemplated the finality of my decision to move - there was no going back, it was "make it" or perish.
    I began searching for a place to stay for a few weeks, I compiled a list of old friends who had their own place and started ringing through, all but one of them said no, the other only said "Let me ask my girlfriend." She said no.
    The first few days were some of the darkest of my life, I was sheltering myself underneath a large space heater for the town centre during the night, it provided enough warmth that I didn't get ill, but the concrete below me made it difficult to sleep, near impossible, there were times when my moods hit rock bottom and I contemplated suicide or theft, but i still didn't rent a hotel room or some other fantasy, I was saving my money, that had to go far.
    3 days later, I got a call, it was my friend, letting me know he had convinced his girlfriend to let me stay for a month and a half, I would be lying now if I said that he saved my life by doing this.
    I started to stay with him, there was no internet at first and the accommodation was as simple as you can imagine (I had one sofa bed and 2 plug sockets, the light bulb in the ceiling was broken, so I only had the light of my old laptop once it started to go dark.)
    Sometimes, I see questions on HN, asking how someone could possibly survive with only $50,000 a year, I was surviving on about £0.25p per day, eating only tinned beans and packets of noodles, drinking water, my diet was and still is atrocious.
    After a couple of months, I managed to find a job with a small web development company as an apprentice, the wages was poor but it was enough, around £300 per month, of which £68 was spent on transport (it was 15 miles from my home, some days, I couldn't afford the Bus and I would walk, i've actually become very accustomed to walking long distances, some days I can cover 1 or 1 + 1/2 marathons (23 / 35 miles) if I want to, and the pain in my feet only lasts a couple of days.)
    I kept this job for 7 months, during which time I spent a further 2 weeks homeless, 2 months in a shelter, 2 months with family and 2 months again at the end with my friend, i loved the job and my boss, he was a lifeline of a sorts for me and taught me a lot.
    Forward to November.
    I was comfortable, in a way, I still ate cheap food and could barely afford travel, but I was able to give my friend money for the rent and to treat my girlfriend occasionally, but it has been an age since I've actually spent money on my self except for hair cuts (something I tend to wait a long period in between) and new shoes (lots of walking wears them out quickly, I average around 200 miles / pair though, so the cost comes to about £0.03 per mile.)
    I was looking for a new job, I felt as though I needed more money, my new found "luxury" wasn't enough and I happened upon a company 30 miles away who wanted a junior developer, £15k per year!
    I interviewed and got offered the job 30 minutes later over the phone, but it meant quitting my first job, I don't lie when I say it was one of the hardest things I've ever had to do, emotionally, to tell him that his only employee was leaving, but it was a necessary decision, for my own future.
    Christmas came fast, but between jobs (I wasn't being hired until January) I had no money, it was a budget, I only just managed to afford a present for my girlfriend (An antique cup and saucer to replace one she smashed accidentally when making a cup of Tea (her favourite drink)) and there wasn't always money for electricity or gas, so some nights I had to lie under my blanket from 6pm just to stay warm.
    Now I have my own home, 2 months later, I couldn't afford the full deposit and had to explain that I "didn't have enough money" to my new landlord, something of a kick to my pride, but he let me have it for cheaper.
    Currently I have £5.62 to my name, to last me until March, but I'm happier than I've ever been, I have everything I've ever wanted (No TV, home internet or phone, but a living girlfriend and a roof over my head) and from here, I can only go up.
    Poverty is not a choice we make, not directly anyway, when I moved I knew it would be hard, but not this hard. I don't know how I will get to work when my bus pass runs out next Monday, I will probably walk.
    I don't know why I told my story here (heavily shortened) but all I know is this: if there is anyone else out there in the positions I've been in this past year, take heart, you are going to survive.
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  • Profile picture of the author vtotheyouknow
    It's all part of the journey. Making money is nice but security is a kind of death. Notice that when you're flat broke your eyes are sharp, your actions are directed - all of your resourcefulness comes to the top and you live intensely.

    I lived in my car in Southern California for about 1.5 months. Rough going but I wouldn't trade it for nothin'. Might even do it again someday... ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author shabit87
    Went to stay with someone as a roommate, weeks later robbed at gunpoint the one day the new roommate decides to spend the night over a friends.

    Spent the night in a waffle house, then over a friends who really couldn't help me. The feeling of not being able to do for myself was awful. I had no money (wallet got stolen, cash and some items I was reselling - that's how I was supporting myself) no computer (it got stolen too) no phone, no ID, no one to help and I hated myself for allowing me to even have to depend on others.

    That's when I made the decision to simply do better, each and every day. A few days later I got a hold of $100. A friend of a friend let me crash on their living floor (no furniture) until I got back on my feet. Took 3 months, but I started taking myself and my online efforts seriously. I had made money before online but it was like a hobby for me.

    To have better, you must do better, and I strive to do just that, every day since.
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  • Profile picture of the author .X.
    I must say some of the best times of my
    life (not to make light of the situation for
    many) have been when I had little to
    nothing.

    Like vtotheyouknow said - it can take
    you down or it can put a needed edge on
    you.

    As for pulling oneself up I think the truth that
    can be found in the situation is that we
    all need people to help us up.

    When you have nothing you have no choice
    but to humble yourself and ask for what's
    needed - and when you get it there's a
    sense of "This is a precious gift - I will not
    **** this up."

    Yes, although not pleasant times those
    times involve the most fond memories and
    the challenges that I am most proud of
    overcoming.

    Me? My family lost everything with no
    insurance to cover it. My wife and I,
    with our 2 daughters (2 and 4mos) at the
    time were homeless (not without shelter)
    for two months and life took off in
    wonderful ways after that.

    "It isn't until you've lost everything that
    you're free to have anything."

    All the best to you - X

    PS - Cool show to check out is "Craigslist Joe".
    It's about a guy who goes out for 30 days
    with nothing to see if he can survive
    for 30 days using Craigslist.
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  • Profile picture of the author Heart Cardio
    This has never been me. I do not even know anyone who has been homeless. I live in a smaller town so we just do not see that here.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Blades
    Have you been homeless and pulled yourself up?
    I thought you knew 99% of the Gurus out there were homeless and made a million dollars from the back of an abandoned car
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    " I knew that if I failed, I wouldn't regret that.
    But I knew the one thing I might regret is not ever having tried. "

    ~ Jeff Bezos

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  • Profile picture of the author ymest
    Never been homeless, thank God! There are strong stories here! I consider myself lucky compared to some of you who had to sleep outside and I salute your courage and determination for going through those challenging times!

    I have had my worries and lost my best friend to cancer 3 years ago and this put me down on many levels, including financially, but I am lucky to have my parents! I decided to change everything in my life the day she died though...and resigned from my day J-O-B on that very day!

    I have been up and down since but moving on now! It takes longer for some! Maybe I am taking my time too!

    Yoan
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  • We lived on the streets for a little bit when I was a kid, and then my mom worked her way out of it and got us a place. I don't really remember it, but I do remember growing up pretty poor. Hard work pulled us through - always does. My mom taught me that. My dad was in prison most of my childhood and OD'd after he got out.

    I was on good footing in my mid-20s. About 7 years ago, though, I had to flee the country because I had a run-in with a criminal organization that was threatening to murder me. A scary place to be when the people after you are too powerful to fight back against - these weren't the type of people I associated with, but I guess I just went home with the wrong girl and got drug into their world by default. Somebody they knew took something valuable from them and the finger got pointed at me. Next thing you know I was under attack and in fear for my life.

    Spent some time stashed out in a hotel room with a loaded pistol and then decided to leverage the misfortune to go travel the world. Grabbed a backpack and hit the road. Left behind everything I owned and everything I knew.

    Life's too short as it is...It might sound cowardly to some, but I wasn't ready for the end and wanted to go get started living instead.

    I had a little money in my pocket when I left, but it didn't last long; when I first left, I didn't know if I'd ever see my family again. After about a year, I finally figured out how to make cash online, just before I hit bottom, but it got worse before it got better.

    By that time all that stress, accumulation of reckless habits, and living in a wild place like Thailand had added up to an alcohol problem. Or maybe it was a life problem hiding behind alcohol. Drank like a fish. Wrecked motorbikes. Got suicidal at times. I ended up getting down to nothing and was stuck in Thailand with no visa for a couple years and nowhere to go even if I could leave. Ran from the cops on multiple occasions so they couldn't get me for no passport - the last thing I wanted was to go to a Thai jail or get shipped back to a country I'd run away from.

    I lived in a $60 apartment and still couldn't pay the electric bill sometimes - fortunately, I was always able to scrape by long enough to get a few thousand baht in my pocket by hiding inside my room (or a friend's when the power was off) and banging away at the keyboard for a few days every time things got tight - I was the only white face in a low-income Thai neighborhood, and my Thai friends were invaluable to me. A lot of the other "farangs" talk about how the Thais, especially the men, are never to be trusted, but I'll never forget them and the way they took me in as one of their own.

    Sometimes you have to get on someone's level before they'll look you in the eyes, you know?

    I've come a long way. The men who were threatening me all ended up dead or in prison - life has a funny way of working its way out, I guess (though I harbor no resentment and wouldn't wish their fates on them). I still look over my shoulder in the states but I'm not as paranoid as I was when I first got back. And all it takes is a few hours distance between me and my old home to calm my nerves.

    I'm not rich, but I often make $100 an hour or more. Got to come home and reunite with my family not once but twice and have spent the last year with them to help show support through some family tragedies (another way the Internet lifestyle does make you rich is the freedom to do this type of thing when it's needed).

    I'm about to head back to Asia to tuck in for a while and live cheaply while I expand my business and pay off a stack of debts that have been laying around since I first fled the country (IRS, hospital bills, etc). Maybe this time with a better head and a better plan I can leverage some of the resources I built last time around.

    I figure if I work hard, spend well, and throw everything else I make at the debts, I'll have it all paid back within the year and be 100% debt-free. After that I'm going to save up for an acre or two of cheap rural land somewhere and build a simple cabin with my own two hands - not to live in but just a place to disappear should I ever be down on my luck or just need some down-time and a break from the world. Planning to keep traveling well into my later years, but needs change, so who knows.

    My current needs are simple; I have no desire at this time to spend the kind of money that impresses others.

    And I've got a pretty solid emergency fund set aside should I end up in a bad situation during this next year abroad. Life feels good right now. Should be on the road again in a week or two.

    Freedom. It smells like that smoky haze that kisses the mountains of Northern Thailand, your helmet off and the wind in your hair as you take in bright green rice paddies like works of art. You swallow a bug from time to time, but in the end it always seems worth the ride.
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