Do you care about your customers?

24 replies
I'm subscribed to a bunch o email lists - newsletters from different WF members. Some of them are really interesting, some give me good ideas for future campaings, some just want to sell their products on daily basis.

I did a little test last week, and sent some emails to the addresses displayed on the emails I receive. I just asked questions related to the product or service promoted.

To my surprise, many more marketers than I thought never answered my emails. Some did in 24/48 hours, some in 2 days and almost 50% never answered.

That makes me think of if most of you ever care about what your customers have to say. How am I suppossed to buy a product from someone who doesn't answer my questions?, meaning he/she doesn't care about me. I rather invest my money in someone else (you just lost a customer!)

I'm going on the list building niche, all my followups go from support@mydomain.com. I set that email on Thunderbird and check it daily. Of course I have a tiny, tiny list so I can answer any question almost instantly. If I ever get a monster list I'd like to see how I deal with dozens or hundreds of emails every day!!

Cheers
#answer #customer #questions
  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fang
    Customer service generates larger revenues in the long run. Only newbies disregard their customers.
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  • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
    If you get to the point where you get A LOT of email feedback an auto-responder telling people you get a lot of email, and that you try to answer them as quickly as possible will help, but a Virtual Assistant who can flag really important stuff and send it to you directly might be helpful, as would that VA taking care of the FAQ type questions, and explaining that the customer had a FAQ type question, and as a VA they answered it, but if they need more info, to send the question to the VA's personal email, and they will then forward to you as the Big Kahuna for more personal attention.

    Just figured I would give you what my own personal plan for growth in email and response time is should I build something successful, which I hope will be the case later this year.

    Of course when I start, the plan is to have my feedback email wired right into my iPhone so that hopefully I respond to any email so quick I get an even bigger fan.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    24/48 hours is a respectable turn around. Everyone doesn't sit online all day and night.

    No answer is a big arrow to the great egress. If I'm not good enough to talk to, I sure am not good enough to spend money on someone's stuff

    Frankly, I've had very few people who have never answered a note from me. It's severely insulting and no marketer with a brain should ever make that mistake. I'm offline in my niche sometimes for a week at a time, but most people I deal with know that. I give the same consideration to others. We DO get online for a little extra freedom, after all, so a late answer to me is as good as a quick one, but an answer IS expected.
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  • Profile picture of the author Toletor
    I totally agree with you guys. I know not everybody is 24/7 online and I don't expect to get an answer in a few minutes, but I do always expect to get a reply to my questions.

    We all have issues that may have us apart from our business for days, and of course there are some customers that want a super extra fast reply in seconds and don't take a no for an answer.

    Creating a FAQ is something I didn't have in time at this time, but I'll think about it as maybe it is better to start it now that I have few customers and few questions

    And for sure when I get my monster list of ultra responsive subscribers that will buy all my products - lol - I'll need to outsource the support department!!
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  • Profile picture of the author GailTrahd
    Interesting, just read a post about this on a FB group I belong to. The gentleman did testing in his own business. He split the sites into 3 groups - one he didn't answer any questions, one he answered after 48 hours at least and the 3rd he answered immediately (as he usually did).

    The first group of sites lost sales over 3 months by 40%, the 2nd lost sales but not as many and the 3rd group continued to grow over time.

    Customer service is important! My parents owned a small family owned restaurant as I was growing up. Even before Disney, my mom used to tell my sister and I, "The customer is always right." Important to answer them too!
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  • Profile picture of the author paul nicholls
    The reality is, many people can't be bothered to reply to emails because they think it does nothing to build their business and make them money

    But it's the complete opposite

    I have always tried to reply to every single email I get from my customers, subscribers or just general people interested in maybe one of my products or my blog etc

    All i can say is it certainly pays off. The amount of people that have thanked me over the last couple of years for doing this is unreal. It's sometimes the small things that people want to see before they end up spending money with someone.

    As they say, if you can't reply to someones question when they are just a subscriber what hope does it give them of you replying to them when they are a customer

    Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Sue McDonald
    If any customer contacts me I always answer them even if they send a rude email. I always answer in the positive and tell them I will help them. It often turns people around and they thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    It’s a big mistake to ignore questions from your subscribers. You can transform them into customers if you’ll be kind, or lose them forever because you'll be indifferent. People like to be respected and attended without delay.

    Sometimes I even stop what I’m doing to answer someone’s questions - if what I’m doing can be interrupted. Otherwise, I answer their questions the fastest possible.

    Yahoo messenger advises me that I had a new message whenever I receive one.

    Sometimes I have questions from buyers too (they cannot find the password, they don’t even know how to download an ebook, etc). In this case I always interrupt what I’m doing to immediately solve his/her problems. I never let anyone suffer for any reason.

    You have to treat your customer as if he/she was your boss.

    This is a law in the online and offline world.

    If you won't follow this law, you will never manage to have regular customers, or even sell your products to just one customer.

    When someone gives you money for some reason, this person must feel that they are respected.






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  • Profile picture of the author CaesarSEO
    I usually answer all customer emails within 5 hours on average. Guess if I make some money online. :d
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  • Profile picture of the author wesd22
    Define "customer."

    If I have 50,000 followers to a FB page that I post affiliate links to, then is every fan a customer or just the ones that buy?

    Reason I ask is because I get a ton of FB emails about dumb stuff that it would kill my productivity and sales take the time to reply to them. These questions are not product related but instead usually

    - "How do I post a pic on your FB page?"

    - "I posted a pic to your FB page, where is it?"

    - "Will you share my pic?"

    - "Who are you?" (seriously)

    - "Will you share my page?"

    I just don't have time for it, especially since the vast majority of FB fans don't buy anything.
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  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    Originally Posted by Toletor View Post

    almost 50% never answered.

    That makes me think of if most of you ever care
    If almost 50% didn't answer, then over 50% did answer, and therefore most of those list owners answered you.

    Notice how your mental picture of the world is the exact opposite of the results your test produced.

    The human brain assigns greater weight to the undesirable than the desirable, because it prefers the avoidance of risk to the pursuit of benefit.

    That said, answering someone's questions about the product you just promoted takes time. And if you spend nine minutes of your time to save a dollar, you're working for less than minimum wage. So look at the products being promoted and the amount of commission you're asking about.

    Because to be perfectly honest, if you have questions about the $5 product I'm promoting for 50% commission, I don't care. If you waste your time asking questions about $5, you're not serious about your business, and if I waste my time answering them neither am I.

    Anyone whose business runs on tiny little commissions is very, very concerned about efficiency. And interacting with your customers, valuable as it may be, is extremely inefficient. Lifetime customer value cuts both ways, and the guy worrying over $5 doesn't really have one. His monthly customer value is just about the commission on that same $5, and he's almost certainly one of the 80% who will fail within a year, which means his lifetime customer value is probably $12 after PayPal fees.

    So the question is, how hard will you work for $12?
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    I want my customers to be satisfied. Sometimes that is easier stated than done, it seems.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarcusJohnson
    Customer support should also be a priority for a business or organization. They should have people who will be responsible in answering these mails they are receiving. Especially when your in an industry where there are lots of competitors, actually whichever industry I guess, there are still lots of competitors. You just have to be wise enough to keep your customers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Susan A
    I am using pareto principle for this kind of trouble. I only answer to 20 percent of my list which I know they are the top buyer on my list. I never answer the rest because ain't nobody got time for that. I have around one hundred email address on my list, and so far so good. As long as the top 20 percent satisfied with my service, answering the rest is just wasting precious time.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ryan David
      Originally Posted by Susan A View Post

      I am using pareto principle for this kind of trouble. I only answer to 20 percent of my list which I know they are the top buyer on my list. I never answer the rest because ain't nobody got time for that. I have around one hundred email address on my list, and so far so good. As long as the top 20 percent satisfied with my service, answering the rest is just wasting precious time.
      I guess that's a good strategy if you are a mind-reader and know who is about to start buying your products.
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Gram
      Originally Posted by Susan A View Post

      I am using pareto principle for this kind of trouble. I only answer to 20 percent of my list which I know they are the top buyer on my list. I never answer the rest because ain't nobody got time for that. I have around one hundred email address on my list, and so far so good. As long as the top 20 percent satisfied with my service, answering the rest is just wasting precious time.
      That sounds more like the go out of business principle.

      I answer every questions, 100% of the time.
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  • Profile picture of the author mogulmap
    My customers and subscribers are everything to me, they actually rescued me from my terrible 9-5 prison and the reason why i stay in business. They trust in me so I owe it to them to provide good customer support.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ryan David
    Another thing to consider is that many IMers fall into the trap of thinking that other IMers are "famous' because they are prolific posters on the WF or elsewhere. In general, most people are not doing as well as you think they are doing.
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  • Profile picture of the author infoway
    The customer experience determines your sales, your profits—and your success. If you don’t provide your customers with the best possible experience every time they do business with you, they won’t stay with you for long.
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  • Profile picture of the author leemajors
    You know about the 80/20 Rule? Right! If not drop me an email..

    Originally Posted by Toletor View Post

    I'm subscribed to a bunch o email lists - newsletters from different WF members. Some of them are really interesting, some give me good ideas for future campaings, some just want to sell their products on daily basis.

    I did a little test last week, and sent some emails to the addresses displayed on the emails I receive. I just asked questions related to the product or service promoted.

    To my surprise, many more marketers than I thought never answered my emails. Some did in 24/48 hours, some in 2 days and almost 50% never answered.

    That makes me think of if most of you ever care about what your customers have to say. How am I suppossed to buy a product from someone who doesn't answer my questions?, meaning he/she doesn't care about me. I rather invest my money in someone else (you just lost a customer!)

    I'm going on the list building niche, all my followups go from support@mydomain.com. I set that email on Thunderbird and check it daily. Of course I have a tiny, tiny list so I can answer any question almost instantly. If I ever get a monster list I'd like to see how I deal with dozens or hundreds of emails every day!!

    Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author LexiB
    In my opinion customer support is what separates the ones who stay and the ones who are gone in a short period of time. I haven't been in the internet business for long (about 9 months total, 6 months full time), but I've seen a lot of people do big launches on Clickbank and then all of a sudden they are gone 2 weeks later.

    I've also seen some people - Brendon Burchard is one that comes to mind - that have been around for a while and will continue to grow. Obviously product quality is extremely important but I think customer support is even more important.

    You can put out a half way decent product that teaches people something and if you provide support that goes way above and beyond everyone else, they'll love you. On the other hand, you can put out the best product ever created but if you ignore emails you'll be done pretty quickly.

    That's just my opinion from what I've seen in my short time in this biz.

    Lex.
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  • If you got on their list after purchasing a WSO it is actually not unlikely that they are out of business... I know a lot of people that just launched 1 or 2 WSO's and then moved on to other ventures - leaving their customer base with the same old follow-up messages.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vonmoore
    Helping customers almost always pays dividends. It's sometimes can be a time suck, but that's the price we pay to be in business. I think marketers who ignore questions are missing the big opportunities to build their businesses.
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  • Profile picture of the author eshoppingez
    Sadly, it's true that there are marketers who don't really care about their customers (future or present). But, as you said, you just have to stop buying from them and buy stuff from people who do care about you.

    Even if they have monster lists, they can very well hire customer support people to answer their customer's questions; that's not too difficult or expensive. Guess there are a lot of people who are only in this business to make a quick buck and then move on.
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