Can you make a "viral" video? Some new perspective here.

14 replies
I have long been of the opinion that it is extremely difficult to create a "viral" video. (And I am not talking about the superficially inflated tactics/views, either). No, I have been of the opinion that to make a video truly share-worthy is no better than a shot in the dark, and that as an IMer your best bet is to stick to keyword specific video marketing - and to me that still generally holds true - as discussed here >

http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6205978

and here >

http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post5596174

and here >

http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6458427

However, the skill level at creating share-worthy videos is certainly improving, and it may no longer be just a "shot-in-the-dark". What I have noticed is that very creative minds have been able to associate their brands/slogans with video concepts that are, first and foremost, of a viral nature, while not being so obviously commercialized.

One of the best, and most recent examples I came across was this Carlsberg video which you will notice has minimal branding but is clearly creating an effective social connection with the brand and it's slogan.


Myself I would have loved to have been inside the meetings where this campaign came to fruition. To me, it's brilliant and has forced me to look differently at the possibility of "creating" a viral video. I think real creativity such as this, can be useful to us IMers in using video for our business, and for offline clients as well.
#make #perspective #video #viral
  • Profile picture of the author chasnsx
    There is a certain formula to creating videos like this. I saw something similar for the Cosmopolitan Hotel in Vegas, where you are shown a lot of swanky looking people engaging in behavior that's a little offbeat, and not shown the reason why until the tagline at the end: Cosmopolitan -- just the right amount of bad.
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  • Profile picture of the author onSubie
    Creating "viral commercials" is becoming a common tactic with big companies. Pepsi is doing it with their "Uncle Drew" commercials and the recent Jeff Gordon "Test Drive" commercial this month.


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  • Profile picture of the author onSubie
    Kevin Allocca gave an excellent TED talk an "Why videos go viral". It's really worth watching and there are some funny videos.

    One big key is having a video noticed by a "tastemaker", or influential person like Jimmy Kimmel.

    Some of the videos are up for nearly a year before they get "tweeted" by someone "big".

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  • Profile picture of the author ZephyrIon
    Some dude was passing around a website earlier that sends likes to your posts on Facebook if you install the app to allow it to use your clicks for the same purpose. I can't find it though..
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    • Profile picture of the author Marty S
      Originally Posted by chasnsx View Post

      There is a certain formula to creating videos like this.
      I don't think there is, otherwise everyone would be doing it.

      Originally Posted by onSubie View Post

      Creating "viral commercials" is becoming a common tactic with big companies. Pepsi is doing it with their "Uncle Drew" commercials and the recent Jeff Gordon "Test Drive" commercial this month.
      Nice examples. Although they look natural, I do think there is a lot of production considerations for these videos. Wouldn't be surprised if there was a full shooting crew involved.

      Originally Posted by onSubie View Post

      Kevin Allocca gave an excellent TED talk an "Why videos go viral". It's really worth watching and there are some funny videos.

      One big key is having a video noticed by a "tastemaker", or influential person like Jimmy Kimmel.
      Thanks for reminding me about this video. I understand the tastemaker as a catalyst, I just don't believe it's something that's required for a video to go viral.


      Originally Posted by ZephyrIon View Post

      Some dude was passing around a website earlier that sends likes to your posts on Facebook if you install the app to allow it to use your clicks for the same purpose. I can't find it though..
      Yeah, this is another phony tactic that has nothing to do with being viral.
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      • Profile picture of the author onSubie
        Originally Posted by Marty S View Post

        Nice examples. Although they look natural, I do think there is a lot of production considerations for these videos. Wouldn't be surprised if there was a full shooting crew involved.
        Yeah both the Uncle Drew and Test Drive videos look far from natural.

        You can see tread marks on the ground during the Test Drive commercial clearly indicating there were multiple takes. Reports also state that most of the driving was done by a stunt driver.

        I don't know how you switch Jeff Gordon and a stunt driver back and forth without the "unknowing salesman" noticing.

        And in the Uncle Drew skits these "inner city" courts are surrounded by crowds of people who coincidentally each have a brand new, full bottle of Pepsi in their hands....

        But the poker "Friend Test" is also a well produced set-up.

        Some "viral videos" are made to look like they are accidentaly captured.

        Like the "Eagle Takes Baby" video from the Montreal media school students.
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  • Profile picture of the author MartinPlatt
    That's gold. I wish I had their budgets to be able to do something like that!!!
    Signature

    Martin Platt

    martin-platt.com

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    • Profile picture of the author Marty S
      Originally Posted by MartinPlatt View Post

      That's gold. I wish I had their budgets to be able to do something like that!!!
      My guess is that budgets for these videos are a LOT less than budgets for traditional television production commercials.
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      • Profile picture of the author onSubie
        Originally Posted by Marty S View Post

        My guess is that budgets for these videos are a LOT less than budgets for traditional television production commercials.

        You would think that, but they have to pay everybody who appears onscreen union scale.

        So you look at the crowds in the b-ball videos and all the people who jump out from the curtain in the "freinds test" commercial and you can see they are spending a lot just on casting.

        Never mind the high production values for shooting and post-production.

        Also, you assume there was "real drama". You have no evidence that all the "friends" were not also actors and "in" on the gag from the beginning.

        After all they are "principals" in the commercial and would have to be contracted and paid as such. Even if after the fact.

        The actor who plays the salesperson in the Jeff Gordon "Test Drive" also looks like he is experiencing "real drama".

        Perhaps the actors who were playing the friends were also "acting" shocked.

        I doubt that a commercial shoot would be allowed to do those fire gags so close to participating actors without prior consent. There are pretty strict regulations when shooting film, television and advertising.
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  • Profile picture of the author onSubie
    LOL! I am just down the road in Ottawa.

    My sister worked with a casting director for many years in Toronto. They did movies, television and all the Mirvish shows like "Lion King".

    She just recently went across Canada casting all the aspiring Dorothy's for the "Over the Rainbow" reality competition to find someone to play Dorothy.

    Small world.
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