YOU vs. I - Who wins in this battle?

7 replies
I am currently working on an e-book for the IM market.

Coming from a copywriting position, I am trying to use YOU instead of I as much as possible in the e-book.

Personally, when reading an informational report or book, do you like to hear examples from the author (I), or do you prefer straight to the point useful info the YOU can use?
#battle #wins
  • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
    Originally Posted by Woody Crenshaw View Post

    I am currently working on an e-book for the IM market.

    Coming from a copywriting position, I am trying to use YOU instead of I as much as possible in the e-book.

    Personally, when reading an informational report or book, do you like to hear examples from the author (I), or do you prefer straight to the point useful info the YOU can use?
    I'm more interested in the information itself than how it is presented. As such, you vs. I is irrelevant so long as I am getting the information I was promised.

    However, in either case, overdoing it can become an issue. Too much you, you, you and it can sound sales-y. You've already got the sale, just present the information. Too much I, I, I and you can sound like your bragging about yourself rather than trying to be informative.

    Just don't overdo it, and I don't think it really matters which way you go. Might be best to stick with whichever is more natural for you.

    Unless, of course, you naturally overdo it.
    Signature

    Dan's content is irregularly read by handfuls of people. Join the elite few by reading his blog: dcrBlogs.com, following him on Twitter: dcrTweets.com or reading his fiction: dcrWrites.com but NOT by Clicking Here!

    Dan also writes content for hire, but you can't afford him anyway.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715354].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Balanced
    I have a different suggestion
    It would be better if you would use She instead of he/she.

    This is the result of a marketing research although natural also, Just think @ it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715363].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Lam
    I have to agree with Dan. Once it's on my platter, I don't care if it was for you or me, it's mine! Just give me the meat and potatoes (along with some tasty sauce) and let me enjoy it. The "you and I" stuff only mattered when I was looking at the menu. Gosh, I'm hungry. Time for some steak at Chili's!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715396].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tyrus Antas
    I only care about myself and my selfish desires, so You works better.

    Tyrus
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715439].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
    I like to try and position as much YOU as I can whenever possible.

    But sometimes a big ole *I* is the crux of the matter, ala The Rich Jerk... so it's subjective.

    As a rule, though... and to directly answer your question, I prefer "I" from an expert. I prefer YOU from somebody unknown to me.

    Make sense?

    Look forward to checking out your thing when it's ready.

    Best,

    Brian
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715563].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author thegamecat
    YOU only become important at the time of selling.
    Signature

    Flying

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715568].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    Once the sale is made, present the information in the best way to get the message across. Sometimes "you" will be more appropriate and sometimes "I" will be. The whole "use you instead of I" is a psychological tactic for the sales message. It doesn't need to be carried forward to content creation.
    Signature

    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[715600].message }}

Trending Topics