by wieserd Banned
24 replies
Hello warriors,

as you already know and see everywhere, a lot of people advertise their content or WSOs like the title of this thread.

This gives me the following questions:

1. how do they know or believe their content is worth $$$$ e.g. $ 947 ?

2. why do they choose to sell it for $ 9 and not $ 19 or $ 29 ?

3. would you return the WSO if the value is not $ 947 but the actual $ 9 ?

4. Is there a chart or statistics to see what you deliver is worth? e.g. if I have an offer about Getting Traffic, what could you say is it worth?

5. How should anyone know what it is really worth, if all the WSOs are a secret until you buy them?

...or is this just a simple (stupid) marketing trick to get people buy their product??

Answers are very appreciated
#$947 #over 9000 #question #worth #wso
  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
    The sales copy related to the product you are linking to in your sig encompasses most of the things you've enquired about.

    Blind copy relating to a "secret".
    Content worth $38 ...Now only $9.

    Would you agree that it's perhaps an odd thing to do if you are unsure of these marketing methods asking if certain approaches are just "stupid tricks"?
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  • Profile picture of the author Eutaw
    That's the old sales gimmicks......Normally $999.99 Right Now You Pay $7.99
    They are also trying to put a relative market value to their product/content for sale.
    In the real world it is the price they sold it for in the past (original retail price)..not just a blind made up figure to look like a great deal. You have probably also figured most WSO's are under $10 (or start below that dollar amount).
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  • Profile picture of the author art72
    Honestly, the answer lies in the eyes of the beholder. Marketing is is an art in itself, so yeah maybe it can be seen as a marketing trick... or however you choose to perceive it.

    However, a good marketer knows: "IF" someone were to "APPLY" the techniques shared in some truly amazing WSO's or other IM related products being sold online the skies the limit. I bought a WSO 2 years ago when I first got online for $37 (It too made a suggested income claim in 'x' amount of hours), and though most of the information was pretty basic, it contained a proven formula, and laid out a very achievable way to create a product and profit from it in less than 24 hours.

    That thread has nearly 5,000 responses, an unheard of amount of 'happy' buyers, and IMHO was rather genius by the creator, as I said; it wasn't that the information was some 'insider secrets' per se, instead... it was 1,2,3... you now have a way to make money online if you take action and apply the process!

    I did, and feel the product was worth more than $37 dollars.

    Copywriting triggers and targets many aspects, greed is a big one... (almost) everyone wants to have more money, so using these techniques to project 'buyers' are saving money and getting great value simply works.

    Now, not all the products are worth the cover price, naturally. However, from a marketing prospective, which would you prefer...

    -Learn How to Make $100 Every 3 Days Working Part-Time Online!

    OR

    -Learn How to Make an Extra $10,000+ Per Year Working Part-Time Online!

    Obviously, they are both conveying the same message, as to earn $33.33 per day = $12,166.67

    However the second example is more likely to get a response.

    Point being, everyone wants to imbed the proceived "value" whereby, psychologically people feel they are getting more than they've paid for... whether it's true or not, depends on the products themselves.

    I personally have bought from some warriors who have blown my mind with the amount of content they share in their WSO's and it truly is a massive over-delivery!

    Then there's the flip-side to that coin... others attempt to replicate that massive over-delivery value, and think by "inflating numbers' that it reflects value, and many times their product flat-out sucks, to put it simply.

    I simply research before I buy anything. See what kind of track record the person has, read through their posts/threads and see if they know their stuff before you buy. Often the big promises of value are over-inflated, and is a desperate marketing attempt.

    In my experience, nearly every WSO that I've ever purchased (as few as they were) almost always over-delivered, and was worth more than I paid, for the WSO for sure. After all, many of the WSO's launched here are sold elsewhere and for a larger asking price... just do your research, and if it really sucks... get a refund!

    Art
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    • Profile picture of the author Malcolm Thomas
      Originally Posted by art72 View Post

      Honestly, the answer lies in the eyes of the beholder. Marketing is is an art in itself, so yeah maybe it can be seen as a marketing trick... or however you choose to perceive it.

      However, a good marketer knows: "IF" someone were to "APPLY" the techniques shared in some truly amazing WSO's or other IM related products being sold online the skies the limit. I bought a WSO 2 years ago when I first got online for $37 (It too made a suggested income claim in 'x' amount of hours), and though most of the information was pretty basic, it contained a proven formula, and laid out a very achievable way to create a product and profit from it in less than 24 hours.

      That thread has nearly 5,000 responses, an unheard of amount of 'happy' buyers, and IMHO was rather genius by the creator, as I said; it wasn't that the information was some 'insider secrets' per se, instead... it was 1,2,3... you now have a way to make money online if you take action and apply the process!

      I did, and feel the product was worth more than $37 dollars.

      Copywriting triggers and targets many aspects, greed is a big one... (almost) everyone wants to have more money, so using these techniques to project 'buyers' are saving money and getting great value simply works.

      Now, not all the products are worth the cover price, naturally. However, from a marketing prospective, which would you prefer...

      -Learn How to Make $100 Every 3 Days Working Part-Time Online!

      OR

      -Learn How to Make an Extra $10,000+ Per Year Working Part-Time Online!

      Obviously, they are both conveying the same message, as to earn $33.33 per day = $12,166.67

      However the second example is more likely to get a response.

      Point being, everyone wants to imbed the proceived "value" whereby, psychologically people feel they are getting more than they've paid for... whether it's true or not, depends on the products themselves.

      I personally have bought from some warriors who have blown my mind with the amount of content they share in their WSO's and it truly is a massive over-delivery!

      Then there's the flip-side to that coin... others attempt to replicate that massive over-delivery value, and think by "inflating numbers' that it reflects value, and many times their product flat-out sucks, to put it simply.

      I simply research before I buy anything. See what kind of track record the person has, read through their posts/threads and see if they know their stuff before you buy. Often the big promises of value are over-inflated, and is a desperate marketing attempt.

      In my experience, nearly every WSO that I've ever purchased (as few as they were) almost always over-delivered, and was worth more than I paid, for the WSO for sure. After all, many of the WSO's launched here are sold elsewhere and for a larger asking price... just do your research, and if it really sucks... get a refund!

      Art
      This. If you're somebody who actually takes action and isn't afraid to fail, then a simple $7 WSO could prove to be the best investment you've ever made.

      Always judge a product by it's content and quality.

      NOT by it's price.

      If the product allows you to make more money or learn a new technique, then it should be considered a success.

      Value is all in the eyes of the beholder.
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    • Profile picture of the author onSubie
      Originally Posted by art72 View Post

      Now, not all the products are worth the cover price, naturally. However, from a marketing prospective, which would you prefer...

      -Learn How to Make $100 Every 3 Days Working Part-Time Online!

      OR

      -Learn How to Make an Extra $10,000+ Per Year Working Part-Time Online!

      Obviously, they are both conveying the same message, as to earn $33.33 per day = $12,166.67

      However the second example is more likely to get a response.
      I would disagree and suggest that $100 every three days "sounds like" more even if it is the same amount. In fact, $100 a day is more, as you calculated.

      It also sounds like a more immediate reward. Rather than waiting a year to see $10,000, I can see $100 in 3 days and repeat it.

      So I guess that is why you should test everything rather than assume everyone sees things the same way....
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by wieserd View Post

    ...or is this just a simple (stupid) marketing trick to get people buy their product??
    A pretty stupid one, quite often, I think.

    There are times that (for instance) a bonus previously sold as a separate product at $27 is included, and then it's clearly perfectly legitimate to say so. In some countries there are laws about this, and if you say that something is "a $97 value" or whatever, you have to have had it on sale at that price for a certain period of time, and sold some, and so on. These things vary. The reality is that, online, people get away with all sorts of deceptive claims in sales posts/pages.

    Sometimes it backfires. Some of us don't buy those on principle, in the belief that the vendor's trying to deceive us (personally, I don't buy from people whose behavior I find "of deceptive intent").

    In the case of WSO's, one can always ask pre-sales questions, along the lines of "On what is that valuation based?" I don't bother, myself, because I won't be buying them anyway, so it wouldn't really be legitimate for me to ask.
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  • They do it because it works the first time I saw a guy say it's $75,000 real world value but today only $497 and people purchased it that is why it's done.
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  • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
    If a person tells me that their $9 product is worth $947, then I will hold them to that.
    Signature

    :)

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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
      [DELETED]
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      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
        Originally Posted by Malcolm Thomas View Post

        Value is all in the eyes of the beholder.
        Agreed.

        .....and the only people who get stung are those who hold bees.

        If you're holding bees (i.e. an unsavoury attitude and outlook) no product is for you.


        Daniel
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    • Profile picture of the author Stuart Walker
      Originally Posted by mojojuju View Post

      If a person tells me that their $9 product is worth $947, then I will hold them to that.
      And who decides what the product is worth? To you it may be worth $9 if you know all the information contained in it. For someone else who it's brand new info it might be worth $947.

      It's all subjective.
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      • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
        Originally Posted by RockingLastsForever View Post

        And who decides what the product is worth? To you it may be worth $9 if you know all the information contained in it. For someone else who it's brand new info it might be worth $947.

        It's all subjective.
        In any transaction, both parties decide what a product is worth.

        And if the seller is making claims about the value of a product and he offers a refund to unsatisfied customers - well he better be prepared to put his money where his mouth is - especially if he's selling a product allegedly worth $947 for only $9.

        Such a great disparity between stated value and product price, as in the $947 value or only $9 product, invites well deserved scrutiny. I think any reasonable person knows when the $9 product he's purchased isn't really worth almost a grand.
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    • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
      Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

      Let me know how you do collecting $938 if you're dissatisfied.
      Ken, you know I said nothing to the effect that I'd request a $938 refund for a $9 product.
      Signature

      :)

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  • Profile picture of the author LexiB
    I don't know the answer to your question but I can tell you one thing that works very well. I've done it in other niches and it increases conversions like crazy.

    Lets say you have a product selling for $97. Then you have a forum (like this one) where you can also sell a "special offer". Leave the product up for $97 and sell it on the forum for $27 or whatever. That, in my opinion is a true special offer representing real value.

    To me, that's real value. Value is what people are CURRENTLY willing to pay. I don't understand the whole "people paid $1,000 for this information now it's yours for $7". They forget to leave out that people may have paid $1,000 in 2006 for the information. Stuff like that is usually just a product creator cleaning out their hard drive.

    It doesn't mean it's bad content. It just means that in my opinion they are misrepresenting the true value because value is what the current market would pay.
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    • Profile picture of the author vickybabe
      Originally Posted by LexiB View Post

      I don't know the answer to your question but I can tell you one thing that works very well. I've done it in other niches and it increases conversions like crazy.

      Lets say you have a product selling for $97. Then you have a forum (like this one) where you can also sell a "special offer". Leave the product up for $97 and sell it on the forum for $27 or whatever. That, in my opinion is a true special offer representing real value.

      To me, that's real value. Value is what people are CURRENTLY willing to pay. I don't understand the whole "people paid $1,000 for this information now it's yours for $7". They forget to leave out that people may have paid $1,000 in 2006 for the information. Stuff like that is usually just a product creator cleaning out their hard drive.

      It doesn't mean it's bad content. It just means that in my opinion they are misrepresenting the true value because value is what the current market would pay.
      I fully agree with this method. The only thing that i would add, is to throw a link in your wso sales copy to the original sales page, so that they can see it without searching for it
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    I've sold a lot of PLR and MMR stuff over the past few years. Once a product is released into that market the perceived value goes down. I've often advertised "The Retail Value Of The Products In This Offer Is $1647.19..." Or something to that effect.

    That's the combined once-retail price of the combined lot. Many of the products I've sold were still selling at the original price. Sometimes inflated price claims work well.

    Others times not so well. Value is relative. Tickets to see Lady Gaga might go for a thousand bucks. I wouldn't pay ten. To each his own.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Whisonant
    A lot of marketers will not like my response but I am going to say it anyway.

    When you see inflated values like that... The marketer falls into one of the following situations.

    1. Trying to take advantage of gullible people. Some call this "just marketing"

    2. Has a very big ego and thinks anything they produce is worth that and a bag of chips. Apparently it's not worth that since they are selling it for $9.

    3. A combination of 1 and 2.

    4. See's many others doing it so they think that has to be the way to get sales. AKA stupid or lacks real world marketing experience.

    5. Or a combination of 1, 2 and 4.

    That's my 2 cents and I am sticking to it!

    Re's
    Rob Whisonant
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  • Profile picture of the author AllanWard
    It's also partly to do with the way our brains are wired - a concept called 'anchoring'. If we see that something is 'worth' $947, our brain holds onto that price as a reference point. When our brain sees that it's selling for only $9, it sees that as a bigger reduction.

    However, one becomes very immune to these types of claims when we realise that the product was never worth $947 in the first place. This happens a lot in the IM market.

    To me, there's a difference between a genuine discount (i.e. the product once sold for $943 but is now reduced) versus 'this product is worth $947 but I'm only selling it for $9'. I can't think of too many products in the offline world that are worth $947 but are sold for only $9 or even discounted to that level.
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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    The worst are those people who write comments in WSO's such as...

    "This course is awesome. I would have easily paid $497+ for this information."

    No you wouldn't have. In most cases they are people writing reviews for the WSO and were so cheap they got a free review copy so they didn't even spend the $7 or $9 to buy the WSO... and then they are telling us they would pay hundreds for it.

    Yeah... right.
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  • Profile picture of the author smodha
    $947 to $9 is a ridiculous jump. I would question whether it is even worth $9.

    If your product has value and delivers what it claims to then people will pay whatever you ask. I say this as a vendor and customer.
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    I Sell What People Want. The Money Is A Bonus..
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  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by wieserd View Post

    Hello warriors,

    as you already know and see everywhere, a lot of people advertise their content or WSOs like the title of this thread.

    This gives me the following questions:

    1. how do they know or believe their content is worth $$$$ e.g. $ 947 ?
    When I offer my own WSOs, I don't use "made up" "value". The "value" that I quote is typically readily available on the forums already. For example, I usually include one of my plugins as a free bonus in each of my offers. I quote the ACTUAL value of the plugin if the customer was to buy it separately.

    2. why do they choose to sell it for $ 9 and not $ 19 or $ 29 ?
    People don't know how to value their time and the over-value their "bonuses". My WSOs are typically more expensive than others because I put a value on my time and include REAL bonuses.

    3. would you return the WSO if the value is not $ 947 but the actual $ 9 ?
    That's difficult to do because absent actual numbers, value is subjective.

    4. Is there a chart or statistics to see what you deliver is worth? e.g. if I have an offer about Getting Traffic, what could you say is it worth?
    No.

    5. How should anyone know what it is really worth, if all the WSOs are a secret until you buy them?
    MY WSOs are not a secret. I don't believe in blind WSOs.
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