Newbie Needs Help - Should i Structure My Emails Like This???

18 replies
Ok, so i'm playing around with my email creator in AWeber, and i wanted to see if it's a good idea to mail out a message with a promotional product or affiliate product in every single email message, while also giving them some useful information on maybe a similar niche or topic. For example, let's say tomorrow i write a 250 word email broadcast and in the message i give useful info, links to other articles/sources, and helpful files for download (maybe not all of that), and then at some point in the message i try to promote an offer or product that relates to all of the info i have been giving...then what if i did that 2 days later? then in another 2 days, and so on and so on....Would that work? Based on personal experience, do you think the conversions would be worth it?

The most important aspect is obviously the info that i'm giving. I'm aiming to build trust, then promote something at the end. but if i did that in every single message, would it be too much?
#emails #newbie #structure
  • Profile picture of the author Woodward82
    Normally I wouldnt post about this as its not my expertise . There is only one answer to this question though, and thats to split test!

    I know its not the answer your looking for but to me it is the best answer.

    Other than that, what would you think if you received these type of emails? Do you think it would look spammy? Im not saying it is or isn't because I would have to actually see the emails to get a feel for what I would personally think. But you can always step outside of the 'marketing' mode and go back into 'consumer mode' . Even as a marketer you still buy things and are still persuaded by marketing tactics everyday . What works on you - as a buyer .
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  • Profile picture of the author JHandy
    First and foremost, you should establish yourself as being a helpful problem solver to them. They are not interested in what you're selling or promoting to them right now, they are interested in what you have to solve their problem. If you got them on your list through solo ads and especially single opt in, they definitely don't have a clue as to who you are and your emails will probably not even get opened.

    So making a long story short, your first goal is to provide valuable information and work on getting your emails opened. Once you see they are opening up your email, then and only then will they start to open their wallets/purses and buy from you.

    It's always going to be a know, like and trust issue with online or internet marketing. Hope this helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author MartinPlatt
    I think it really depends on how useful the information is for the people on your list.

    This means that you're actually solving the problems of your subscribers.

    If the information is just there to try to disguise the fact that you're pitching, your subscribers will probably see straight through the ploy.

    It also depends on whether the thing you're promoting naturally flows on or is an extension of the information that you're giving. If it does, you might get away with it.

    You will have to test it to be sure though, with your list...
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  • Profile picture of the author khooster1
    Hi Nic,

    Don't be afraid to promote..

    You are on the right direction:
    1. Give good content/ value
    2. Promote your product..

    There are no contradictions in provide both in your
    Email marketing..

    These are totally fine.

    To have better conversion rate, you néed to
    Structure your content around your product..

    Do not hard sell your product..
    Relationship building is more than providing
    Good value.. You need to do more such as
    Sharing your experience, personnel opinion, etc..

    There are more to emailing marketing than just these..

    Got to do more testings to understand your list..

    PM me if you need more help on these..

    I will be able to provide you with more advices..
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  • Profile picture of the author Martin Avis
    All that in 250 words? Seriously?

    Building trust and responsiveness from your readers will take a lot more work than that. Look around at email newsletters (ezines, for want of a better word) from those of us who write them for a living - that's your objective, right? - and you'll see that 1-2000 words is more like it.

    Short emails may be fine for the odd announcement, but real newsletters that people take the time to read demand a lot more input from you, the writer.
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  • Profile picture of the author AlisonM
    If recipient feels they are getting too many emails and product offers from someone they are likely to stop opening the emails, or unsubscribe. Some marketers don't mind this as they are aggressively getting new subscribers to replace the lost ones.

    Other marketers over-deliver free and helpful information and only gradually and occasionally send affiliate links after they have built up a relationship.

    A lot will depend on what you want your relationship with your list to be. Then test, split-test, and monitor the results.

    Regards
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    • Profile picture of the author Martin Avis
      Originally Posted by AlisonM View Post

      If recipient feels they are getting too many emails and product offers from someone they are likely to stop opening the emails, or unsubscribe. Some marketers don't mind this as they are aggressively getting new subscribers to replace the lost ones.

      Other marketers over-deliver free and helpful information and only gradually and occasionally send affiliate links after they have built up a relationship.

      A lot will depend on what you want your relationship with your list to be. Then test, split-test, and monitor the results.

      Regards
      Im my experience - twelve years, 1183 editions and well over 1.5 million words - nobody unsubscribes if you consistently recommend good products. Provided, of course, that your recommendations are wrapped up in other interesting content.

      They won't even unsubscribe if you email them every single day - provided they look forward to reading what you have to say. When I was publishing 5 days a week the only complaints I got were when I missed a day.

      Send out flimsy (250 word) emails that make no effort to really communicate with the reader, hawk every latest product without any regard to its quality and treat your readers as a 'list of customers' - now THAT's the way to get them to unsubscribe - or worse, ignore you.
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      • Profile picture of the author Stuart Walker
        Originally Posted by Martin.Avis View Post

        Im my experience - twelve years, 1183 editions and well over 1.5 million words - nobody unsubscribes if you consistently recommend good products. Provided, of course, that your recommendations are wrapped up in other interesting content.

        They won't even unsubscribe if you email them every single day - provided they look forward to reading what you have to say. When I was publishing 5 days a week the only complaints I got were when I missed a day.

        Send out flimsy (250 word) emails that make no effort to really communicate with the reader, hawk every latest product without any regard to its quality and treat your readers as a 'list of customers' - now THAT's the way to get them to unsubscribe - or worse, ignore you.
        I agree. You can email daily and have an offer in every email if there's value being delivered too. People don't mind you mentioning a product if you've just given them a ton of useful advice as well. Blatant daily promos won't work though.
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      • Profile picture of the author mekdroid
        Originally Posted by Martin.Avis View Post

        Im my experience - twelve years, 1183 editions and well over 1.5 million words - nobody unsubscribes if you consistently recommend good products. Provided, of course, that your recommendations are wrapped up in other interesting content.
        Interesting ... I noticed that 1,500,000 words / 1,183 = 1,267 words per article, on average.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Parkhouse
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    • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
      Originally Posted by Paul Parkhouse View Post

      The only way to find out if something will work is to "Test"

      Maybe it will, maybe it won't. Test different kind of emails until you start seeing the results you want.
      Testing is important, no doubt. But it's a waste of time to test something already known to be ineffective. I think there's a ton of evidence out there already proving that pitching folks in every mailing with little more than 250 words of content is a losing proposition. People don't mind being sold so much if they're getting some good value along with the offers.
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Parkhouse
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        • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
          Originally Posted by Paul Parkhouse View Post

          It's never a waste of time to test anything.

          Some of the biggest breakthroughs in my business have come about from testing things "already known to be ineffective."
          It is a waste of time. When the overwhelming consensus of an entire industry has collectively come to a conclusion, in this case, a fairly obvious conclusion, then the point has already been tested.

          The only people feeling the need to "test everything" are most often those who are new to marketing, stubborn, ignorant, or have bought into the overused and often irrelevant "test everything" nonsense. There's that group and those who don't have access to widely available information.

          Take a sales page for example. One so hideously ineffective that an elementary school kid could recognize it as a train wreck. Surely something like this doesn't apply to your statement, "It's never a waste of time to test anything."
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    I agree with Martin.Avis. 250 words is pretty thin. I can't even get warmed up with 250 words. If you're going to be pitching them in every email I'd say you need three times that much content or more, good content.
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  • Profile picture of the author dbrwn
    If you structure your emails in such a way that all of your affiliate links and other promotional links are towards the bottom and the content above, then you shouldn't have any problems converting. However, if you start placing affiliate links and other sales links inside the body of the message, then personally it looks to be pushy.

    You want to convey any information that you want to convey first, and then provide any sales material at the bottom of the message. At least that's my personal take on this.
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  • Profile picture of the author Malcolm Thomas
    The best answer to your question is for you to test yourself and see the results that you get. If you get great results then you're on to something good, if not, well then continue to test and tweak. Different things work better for different people.
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  • Profile picture of the author bobby_shahzad
    I think it is a good idea. However, you should really focus on building a strong relationship with your list before sending them affiliate offers. Establish yourself as an expert in the niche first, try to give away some free gifts or reports first. Once you have enough trust, then you can ask them to buy products.

    An affiliate email is a news about some interesting new product. dont recommend a product unless you are satisfied yourself. If you dont feel good buying a product then chances are that majority of your list wont buy it either. So only recommend high quality stuff and stay far away from crap products. This way you will save your relationship and your subscribers money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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    Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

    Testing is important, no doubt. But it's a waste of time to test something already known to be ineffective. I think there's a ton of evidence out there already proving that pitching folks in every mailing with little more than 250 words of content is a losing proposition.
    This. Exactly.

    Some things are far more worthwhile split-testing than others.

    It's always convenient/vaguely plausible for people posting in forums to point out that the only way to be absolutely certain about anything is to test it for yourself. It isn't always very helpful. One has to choose what to test, and how, after all.

    Nicolas, you need to stop listening to people mindlessly saying "test it". Some things are too nonsensical and ridiculous to test, and this is one of them.

    And for someone trying to make money in IM/MMO markets not to appreciate this throws light on the true, concealed problem, here.

    Originally Posted by nicolasmd2112 View Post

    Newbie Needs Help
    Originally Posted by nicolasmd2112 View Post

    I'm aiming to build trust
    Absolutely no impoliteness intended, but these two sentences very neatly demonstrate the inherent conflict for you, Nicolas, and the matter that needs attention: you describe yourself as a "newbie" yet you're choosing to involve yourself in IM/MMO markets and trying to build trust in your own expertise among an audience of people many of whose experience and knowledge are well beyond yours. You're trying to teach people about making money from something from which you're not yourself making any money. That's the real problem, here. And until you remedy that, the reality is that it isn't going to make a whole lot of difference to you how often you send out emails, what length they are, or what proportion of them is promotional. Please excuse the observation that analysing that is simply yet another misguided attempt to paper over the cracks.

    Judging by the threads you've started off recently, nothing much has changed for you since this conversation, a few months ago.

    There are reasons for that, but you're ignoring them. Sorry.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jackson Tan
    imho. test it.. every list is unique.. most importantly, give them value and also understand their needs. What works for other might not work for you..

    To Your Fun & Freedom
    Jackson Tan
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  • Profile picture of the author Ryan Kuchel
    You'd have to test it out man, if you haven't check out Autoresponder Madness by Andre Chaperon (google it) or bensettle.com.

    Both of those dudes know their shit when it comes to getting high response rates in email marketing.
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