Best Way to Buy AGED Domains

25 replies
ok you spend 8 hours researching and FINALLY you find the holy grail of the domains (at least is what you think)... then you see that the domain is aged back 1996 and you go catching!

Hi guys, alex here. Last month I found a 10 year old domain that was expired, so I went and I register the domain and now the date is showing 2013...

What did I miss? What did I do wrong?

My questions is; how can you buy expired aged domains and Keep Their Age.

thanks in adance

Alex
#aged #buy #domains
  • Profile picture of the author mrdeleted
    You cant unless you use the drop catching sites. I know, I been in the domain industry around a decade.
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  • Profile picture of the author Meharis
    Originally Posted by alexsbusiness View Post

    ok you spend 8 hours researching and FINALLY you find the holy grail of the domains (at least is what you think)... then you see that the domain is aged back 1996 and you go catching!

    Hi guys, alex here. Last month I found a 10 year old domain that was expired, so I went and I register the domain and now the date is showing 2013...

    What did I miss? What did I do wrong?

    My questions is; how can you buy expired aged domains and Keep Their Age.

    thanks in adance

    Alex

    I don't understand. You did not ran a Whois or Wayback Machine to verify..?

    Meharis
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  • Profile picture of the author YellowGreenMedia
    I really don't get it either, cus when there is an archive of a domain it just doesn't go away when you register it again.
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  • Profile picture of the author MelanieandMiles
    We have had great success with snapnames.com for buying aged domain names.

    Just doublechecked my last couple purchases through them and I can confirm the whois record shows the creation date as 2002 when I just bought it earlier this year.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
    The answer is simple:
    In order to retain the age, you have to take possession of the domain before it drops. If it has already dropped, it may still show the old 'age' until it is registered once again.
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  • Profile picture of the author ilee
    Originally Posted by alexsbusiness View Post

    ok you spend 8 hours researching and FINALLY you find the holy grail of the domains (at least is what you think)... then you see that the domain is aged back 1996 and you go catching!

    Hi guys, alex here. Last month I found a 10 year old domain that was expired, so I went and I register the domain and now the date is showing 2013...

    What did I miss? What did I do wrong?

    My questions is; how can you buy expired aged domains and Keep Their Age.

    thanks in adance

    Alex
    You're getting confused between EXPIRED domains and EXPIRING domains. If the domain has been dropped, the age is reset. On another note, age isn't what you should be looking out for because domain age by itself gives minimal benefits over new domains, it's aged backlinks that make the difference
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  • Profile picture of the author CandyxLand
    You got a dropped domain. This means that the domain was dropped from the domain name registry. In the future you can avoid this by using the domaintools whois lookup. It shows if it's ever been dropped.
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  • Profile picture of the author Cobaki
    The age of the website will reset once it becomes expired. Either way, this should not concern you and focus on the quality of the website.
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  • Profile picture of the author alexsbusiness
    Ok so NOW i know to check on snapnames for great aged domains and make sure don't buy dropped domains... now leads me to my next question:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ng-flippa.html
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  • Profile picture of the author Titan86
    I urge you to be very cautious about buying any domain names for speculative purposes at this particular moment.

    Later this year, ICANN will start to release hundreds of keyword-related gTLDs that could change everything.

    The SEO benefit of a "free" keyword in your URL could be a game-changer.

    The psychological impact can't be underestimated either.

    Which of these do you think the average Googler will be more inclined to click on?

    http://bodybuilder.com or http://bodybuilder.fitness
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    • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
      Originally Posted by Titan86 View Post

      Which of these do you think the average Googler will be more inclined to click on?

      Bodybuilder.com or http://bodybuilder.fitness
      Actually, I would much rather own the .com version. If the new TLDs ever really catch on (and history has proven they won't), it will take many years to switch the consumer mindset from typing in .com. If you build a website on any other TLD, much of your marketing will be lost in traffic to the .COM owner.

      bodybuilder.fitness would be great to own - but only if you also owned Bodybuilder.com
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  • Profile picture of the author Titan86
    Interesting. I'd buy a new one in a heartbeat if it gave me an advantage in the SERPS.

    It's true that people haven't exactly rushed to new gTLDs, but they've only been remarketed ccTLDs to this point. Never before has one been an actual keyword.

    I never type .com at the end of a search term. I wonder how many people really do.
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    • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
      Originally Posted by Titan86 View Post

      Interesting. I'd buy a new one in a heartbeat if it gave me an advantage in the SERPS.
      So would I, but that just won't happen. The content of the website will be what makes the difference. Whether it's a .com, .net, .info, .fitness, they will all rank equally, based on the content, even if the domain name is nonsensical.

      Originally Posted by Titan86 View Post

      It's true that people haven't exactly rushed to new gTLDs, but they've only been remarketed ccTLDs to this point. Never before has one been an actual keyword.
      Very true. And it will be interesting to watch what happens.

      Originally Posted by Titan86 View Post

      I never type .com at the end of a search term. I wonder how many people really do.
      I don't have the actual stats, but I do know it is a serious issue with many websites, some more than others of course. A lot has to do with the way the website is marketed. If there is media advertising (newspapers, radio, print, etc.), the traffic leak will be very significant. If the non-com domain is promoted just online with links to click on, not so much of a problem.
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  • Profile picture of the author igg
    My guess is that once a domain is bought it becomes reported and the domain age starts all over again, although I am not 100% sure on that but i have heard that it has happened to others.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
    Thank you so much Tim, I truly appreciate the nice words.
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  • Profile picture of the author herrick
    thanks I just purchased your product gene
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  • Profile picture of the author ZerocooI
    You're getting confused between EXPIRED domains and EXPIRING domains. If the domain has been dropped, the age is reset. On another note, age isn't what you should be looking out for because domain age by itself gives minimal benefits over new domains, it's aged backlinks that make the difference
    I agree with this very much. I don't think Google cares how aged the domain is if it has been just sitting with no content or activity for 10 years and no links pointing towards it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Mensah
      Originally Posted by ZerocooI View Post

      I agree with this very much. I don't think Google cares how aged the domain is if it has been just sitting with no content or activity for 10 years and no links pointing towards it.
      yes, as far as google is concerned it might as well be a new domain because there hasn't been any recent activity or backlinks on that domain.
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  • Profile picture of the author mrdeleted
    Created:1999-02-25 (Deceivers.com) I bought it at GoDaddy auctions.
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  • Profile picture of the author jackkarter
    I wouldn't worry about domains being dropped. If it's been dropped a zillion times, it makes no difference. The domain age is NEVER reset. Google has no authority to reset anything. It's just a website like any other (although it likes to think otherwise). All that changes is the registration date of the new "owner". The domain remains as old as it ever was.

    The most important thing is the backlinks pointing to it. If they are still good, your onto a winner but DO check that the backlinks are live. If you have one PR5 as a backlink. then you are guaranteed a PR3 domain at the next PR update.
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  • Profile picture of the author Fazal Mayar
    Gene has answered teh question well. For example, I bought a 6 years old domain from GOdaddy and it is still 6 years. Buy it before it expires and you have to transfer it to your hosting as an addon domain
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  • Profile picture of the author tritrain
    This is the best tool I've found on analyzing expired domains. Expired Domains with PR, Backlinks and more completely FREE

    Sign up for a free account and you'll have even better tools.
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    Domains for sale - see seopositions.net
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