45 replies
Hello Everyone!

I have a question....when you have to write an article and you don't know much about the topic, what do you do? Thank you so much.....
#article #writing
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Irish802 View Post

    when you have to write an article and you don't know much about the topic, what do you do?
    Seek information offline.

    There's not much point in regurgitating information freely available via a search-engine: if you don't know much about the topic, then many of the eventual readers are very likely to know more than you do in the first place; if that "shows", the article will have little value toward its intended purpose. You have to try to give people something (even if it's only "a little something"!) they can't easily find elsewhere.
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    • Profile picture of the author goindeep
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Seek information offline.

      There's not much point in regurgitating information freely available via a search-engine: if you don't know much about the topic, then many of the eventual readers are very likely to know more than you do in the first place; if that "shows", the article will have little value toward its intended purpose. You have to try to give people something (even if it's only "a little something"!) they can't easily find elsewhere.
      Alexa, I have no idea where you are going with this other than to be the first to say something different which is sometimes trendy... honestly.

      That's like telling someone who needs to travel to China and doesn't know how to get there to take a ship, when they can fly...

      Absurd. Really. I mean your getting paid for an article, so let's be realistic here, do you really expect people to go outside and talk to people in said industry or go to the library for the $7 they are about to make on that article?

      For someone who has over 20K posts, it doesn't look like you practice what you preach.

      Sorry to get all ranty n ya, but I can never stand it when people here post crap for the sake of getting a thanks or being hip and trendy.

      No hard feelings, sincerely.

      ---

      The Internet is by far the Planets greatest source of information that can be read, digested and put to use within mere seconds. Full stop.
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      • Profile picture of the author Doug Wakefield
        Alexa's offline suggestion has a lot of merit. The first place I typically start is with published books. While I don't "start" offline, I often end up going that path later on.

        I start with Amazon. Most books that are listed there allow you to have a sneak peek inside of the book to help with the buying decision. Unfortunately, they only throw up the first 10% of the book limiting our ability to use the actual content as research. Lucky for us, we don't need the actual content to get started. What we want to look at is the table of contents.

        It is important to mention this first. I would stick to actual published books for this method over self-published titles for one specific reason. If one of the big name publishers prints a book, there is enough of a track record for the topic for them to take a shot on it. They also have a pretty strict group of editors that keep things in check. Many times authors will have to submit an outline for the book beforehand as well, before the O.K. is even granted on the book.

        This is not a slight to self-published authors, but there is currently very little quality control on that side of the publishing business still.

        Anyways, the table of contents will give you valuable clues as to what information is important to this market. Chapter titles, sub-headlines, etc can be used as a starting point for your research. If the author can write a chapter about a specific topic, odds are that you can easily write an article.

        Depending on the time you have to get the work done, and pay associated, you probably want to consider buying books and products for your research. Double this if you find yourself working in a specific niche for long periods for various clients, or if you get handed a larger contract with a higher payout but more content needs.

        One last thing to add, in Alexa's defense again, the price you are being paid for the article will often correlate to the amount of research you can devote to it. If you are only getting paid $5 an article, and expecting to support a family, you are not going to realistically be able to do a ton of research. Higher paying gigs will allow you to research more, while offsetting the time lost writing with higher pay.

        If you end up buying the books, you may even consider billing this to the client. Of course you would need to notify them in advance, but this can be done with your correspondence with your clients before accepting the work. Once again, higher paying clients are going to be much more receptive to this.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        Alexa, I have no idea where you are going with this other than to be the first to say something different
        I happened to be the first to reply, this time: you can hardly blame me for it turning out to be "different"! (Actually you're quite mistaken: it didn't, anyway - many agreed with me ).

        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        Absurd.
        Sorry you thought so.

        Looks like the professional writers in the thread, so far, all agreed with my perspective? "Go figure".

        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        do you really expect people to go outside and talk to people in said industry or go to the library for the $7 they are about to make on that article?
        No, of course not. You're the only person here who's mentioned $7. There are writers here asking $200 for an article, and getting it from regularly returning clients profiting from their work. (Do you want their names? I doubt, somehow, whether you're a potential client for them, given your perspective).

        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        it doesn't look like you practice what you preach.
        That's just being insulting for the sake of it. And you're totally wrong: I practice exactly what I preach. I only "preach" it because I make such a good living from it (purely as "my own client", I mean, i.e. as a "customer" - I have absolutely no writing services of any kind to offer to anyone else, so please don't imagine that I'm "promoting" anything, here ... nor have I ever done so in the past).

        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        I can never stand it when people here post crap
        I saw none. I offered a simple answer to a simple question, briefly explaining my reasons for it, and others here "in the trade" supported it.

        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        No hard feelings, sincerely.
        "None taken", as they say.

        We just have very different understandings and/or experiences of how articles produce income, I suspect. There's no harm in that, at all.

        It's just a shame (and perhaps especially for others here in the OP's position?) that the perspectives of those "in the trade" are dismissed out of hand as "crap" in quite such an offensive way, and our motivations for posting called into question into the bargain. I don't mind your disagreement at all: you have every right to express it. But in my opinion dismissing the well-reasoned opinion of a successful professional (supported by others in similar positions) as "crap" just isn't the most appropriate way to do so. Just my perspective.
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        • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
          Banned
          I'm neither yea or nay for the points raised by @goindeep or @AlexaSmith

          What I will say is . . .

          As a reasonably well known author, up until 6 or 7 years ago much of my research for my own books was completed "offline". However, as I've used the internet progressively more for research, I doubt since then I've had to resort to "offline" resources in more than a handful of instances.

          It's worth mentioning that I have self-published numerous books for offline sales including a few best sellers, and also completed in excess of 300 articles for certain clients and friends, although I don't tout for business as an article writer as such. All my own books were specialised topics that required exhaustive research, as were the majority of the articles, but for the past 6 or 7 years I've always sourced and found what I required online.

          The internet is now burgeoning with so much information that anyone claiming what they're looking for is unavailable online is (in my opinion) either blind, stupid, or both.


          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post


          Looks like the professional writers in the thread, so far, all agreed with my perspective? "Go figure".


          . . . others here "in the trade" supported it.

          I didn't spot many of them in the posts prior to yours, unless you know something I don't
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        • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
          Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

          Alexa, I have no idea where you are going with this other than to be the first to say something different which is sometimes trendy... honestly.

          That's like telling someone who needs to travel to China and doesn't know how to get there to take a ship, when they can fly...

          Absurd. Really. I mean your getting paid for an article, so let's be realistic here, do you really expect people to go outside and talk to people in said industry or go to the library for the $7 they are about to make on that article?

          For someone who has over 20K posts, it doesn't look like you practice what you preach.

          Sorry to get all ranty n ya, but I can never stand it when people here post crap for the sake of getting a thanks or being hip and trendy.

          No hard feelings, sincerely.

          ---

          The Internet is by far the Planets greatest source of information that can be read, digested and put to use within mere seconds. Full stop.
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          I happened to be the first to reply, this time: you can hardly blame me for it turning out to be "different"! (Actually you're quite mistaken: it didn't, anyway - many agreed with me ).



          Sorry you thought so.

          Looks like the professional writers in the thread, so far, all agreed with my perspective? "Go figure".



          No, of course not. You're the only person here who's mentioned $7. There are writers here asking $200 for an article, and getting it from regularly returning clients profiting from their work. (Do you want their names? I doubt, somehow, whether you're a potential client for them, given your perspective).



          That's just being insulting for the sake of it. And you're totally wrong: I practice exactly what I preach. I only "preach" it because I make such a good living from it (purely as "my own client", I mean, i.e. as a "customer" - I have absolutely no writing services of any kind to offer to anyone else, so please don't imagine that I'm "promoting" anything, here ... nor have I ever done so in the past).



          I saw none. I offered a simple answer to a simple question, briefly explaining my reasons for it, and others here "in the trade" supported it.



          "None taken", as they say.

          We just have very different understandings and/or experiences of how articles produce income, I suspect. There's no harm in that, at all.

          It's just a shame (and perhaps especially for others here in the OP's position?) that the perspectives of those "in the trade" are dismissed out of hand as "crap" in quite such an offensive way, and our motivations for posting called into question into the bargain. I don't mind your disagreement at all: you have every right to express it. But in my opinion dismissing the well-reasoned opinion of a successful professional (supported by others in similar positions) as "crap" just isn't the most appropriate way to do so. Just my perspective.

          Hmmm... Perhaps it is Midnight-Thirty and I am into my wine,
          but I really thought his post was just an "in-character" advertisement
          for his signature?

          "The ONLY Humor & Comedy Writing Service On The Warrior Forum is Back!"
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      • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
        Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

        The Internet is by far the Planets greatest source of information that can be read, digested and put to use within mere seconds. Full stop.
        Within mere seconds you can buy Kindle books, read them, digest them, and put them to use. And that's one way of seeking information offline, even if they happen to be online.

        Another one is to access Jstor or one's university library which have a lot of books/journals released in electronic version.

        And $7 for an article? I don't have English as my first language, and I often make grammar/spelling/syntax mistakes, but even I wouldn't dream of writing an article for less than $30-$40 on the topics I'm specialized in.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    You should never write an article you don't want to write, especially with a topic with which you are uncomfortable.

    I assume that you have been asked to do a freelance writing job. Some times it is advisable to reject a job of that type if you are unfamiliar with the topic at hand.

    If you are serious about pressing on, I spend half an hour familiarizing myself with the topic, before I sit down to write.
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    • Profile picture of the author davidkings
      You can get other content writers to do this for you, who are specialist writers.
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  • Profile picture of the author davidfrankk
    Write about whatever you know best. It will bring out the best in you.
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  • Profile picture of the author TimothyTorrents
    You just need to research the topic thoroughly. Dig around online for the information you need. Don't just rewrite the first article you find about the topic.
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    • Profile picture of the author mcsl
      If its for a particular niche, speak to someone in that niche. If you get info offline, can you seek it out from books?
      You could also interview an expert in the topic you're wanting to learn more about.
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      • Profile picture of the author Sharvin Exubrio
        Hi Irish802,

        The advice on interviewing an expert is a good one.
        Firstly, you get a chance to learn more about the topic.
        Secondly, you get quality content to give to your readers.
        Thirdly, you build credibility for your branding.

        Please share your progress if you manage to get any "experts" on board!
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    • Profile picture of the author TheEye
      Below are a few ways to do the research.

      1. Go to to forums on your niche (or similar niches if you can't find a forum on your specific niche).

      Search the forum to see if there are any threads on the subject you are writing on. You are looking for threads with lots of comments. This will give you all sides of the topic being discussed.

      If there are no threads, post one asking where you can find information on the topic.

      2. Set a Google alert to capture any new references to the subject of your article.

      3. Go to Google Books and see if you can find a book on the topic. You can also see if there are any books in your local library.

      Your local librarian might also be able to suggest sources of information not available on the internet.

      4. Another way is to contact an expert in the field and see if they will let you interview them via Skype or Email. The article(s) then becomes the questions and answers with an introduction and maybe some commentary.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rose Anderson
    I second what Alexa said. I spend a lot of time at bookstores and the library so I'm not simply rewriting what's online. When you do research online look for authority sites. Don't rewrite what you find in ezine articles.

    I also agree with Bill. I turn down ebook assignments on any high tech subject because the projects would take me too much research time. Plus, I don't enjoy writing about those subjects and that's part of the fun of being your own boss.

    Rose
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  • Profile picture of the author JoeMack
    I would also visit popular blogs and forums in the niche that you are writing about. See how people of this group communicate with each other. See what issues are on their minds right now.

    JoeMack
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    • Profile picture of the author PCH
      I would be pretty confident that could write a pretty good article about any topic that anyone would care to mention, simply by researching what's available online.

      I reckon that whatever is available in bookstores or elsewhere, is available online. And let's be honest, if the OP is only being asked to write one article (just an assumption), then it won't pay enough for her to go spend time looking round bookshops etc.

      In my opinion, the appeal of any article lies largely in the way it's written, more so than in the total originality of the content.
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      • Profile picture of the author rickwill71
        could you find another topic that you would be more comfortable with?

        good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author georgecamins
    If you're not familiar with the subject, do some research on it. Build your website around it and provide good quality content about the subject.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rose Anderson
    Originality is important. But accuracy is also important. This is where many people fail in their online searches. A lot of garbage exists on the internet and you have to be careful where you do your research. Otherwise you end up with article after article repeating the same inaccurate statements.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Undertake research to write an article about something that you do not know much about.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rose Anderson
    I don't consider myself "blind, stupid or both". I wasn't saying research can't be done online. But I still think it's important to use authority sites and not follow the advice of "find an article on ezinearticles and then rewrite".

    I will admit it has been a long time since I wrote a $7 article. When I did I rarely wrote just one. Even when I wrote ten articles on one topic is was often worth going the six blocks to the library.

    Maybe it's because I'm "old" that I still like to pick up a book on occasion. If so, I can live with that. I would prefer not to be called stupid.

    Rose
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    • Profile picture of the author Nathan251
      Let's not forget that some article-buyers want a quick turnaround. Now as much as I admire the pioneering ethos that would endeavour to uncover some wonderous new mine of original information relating to a particular topic, that is not always possible.

      There's not a lot more a man or woman can know about, for example, the classic golf swing, than is already freely available on the internet in a variety of different forms. The scope and theme of the article, of course, will determine to a large extent how much freedom the author has to put his or her own spin on things, but we are not journalists and most articles are not opinion pieces.

      Forgive me if I have misunderstood guys, but there's a lot to be said for a well-written article that is to the point and simply does what the writer requests. We are not competing to be the next Shakespeare or researching a Masters thesis here after all.

      Now I am certainly not advocating the notion of merely paraphrasing from one or two well-known sources elsewhere, but I would be reluctant to accept the idea that it is necessary to do offline investigative work to complete an article.

      Ideally we would all write about what we love all the time but that's not always possible - therefore research is necessary but don't overdo it because it is the writing that we are ultimately about, so let's put aside the aspirations to winning the Pulitzer prize and get back to what we're being paid to do.

      It is simply not practical for anybody to expect an article-writer to produce, conceptually at least, wholly unique and original material unavailable anywhere else in the websphere (unless you raise my rates significantly and allow me a month or so to complete the article).
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    • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Rose Anderson View Post

      I don't consider myself "blind, stupid or both". I wasn't saying research can't be done online. But I still think it's important to use authority sites and not follow the advice of "find an article on ezinearticles and then rewrite".
      Well why have you got your knickers in a twist, because what I said obviously doesn't apply to YOU then.

      Originally Posted by Rose Anderson View Post

      I will admit it has been a long time since I wrote a $7 article.
      The OP's question never mentioned $7 articles. Why are some people assuming the question relates to "cheap" articles.

      Originally Posted by Rose Anderson View Post

      Maybe it's because I'm "old" that I still like to pick up a book on occasion. If so, I can live with that. I would prefer not to be called stupid.
      Being an author/publisher, I like to pick books up on EVERY occasion. And the "old" factor doesn't come into it.

      No-one called YOU stupid.

      A sign of a good writers intelligence is being able to dissect the written word. Just saying.
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      • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
        Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

        Well why have you got your knickers in a twist, because what I said obviously doesn't apply to YOU then.



        The OP's question never mentioned $7 articles. Why are some people assuming the question relates to "cheap" articles.



        Being an author/publisher, I like to pick books up on EVERY occasion. And the "old" factor doesn't come into it.

        No-one called YOU stupid.

        A sign of a good writers intelligence is being able to dissect the written word. Just saying.

        I could be wrong here (after all I'm merely a genius
        and not a god), but when I read Rose's post (which
        happens to be geographically located just beneath
        your own) I really thought she was replying to what
        goindeep said, for the most part? :confused:


        ...Also, I would point out that a handful of professional
        writers in a single thread can very well be considered
        to be "many" in many cases?


        ...And finally, just one more question in response to this
        statement, if I may?

        Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

        The internet is now burgeoning with so much information that anyone claiming what they're looking for is unavailable online is (in my opinion) either blind, stupid, or both.
        Great, maybe you can help this blind, stupid fool with my current
        article? Can you get me a link to what F. J. Lovret said about how
        to wield a yari and make the switch from chudan to jodan and
        back again? It would save me so much time, because I have
        no idea which issue of the Budo Shinbun it was published in,
        or even what year? Thanks in advance! :rolleyes::p
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        • Profile picture of the author Doug Wakefield
          The reason people associate the $7 (or less) and article is because of this very forum. You will find no shortage of people willing to work for less than that here. Many in this very forum find it hard to believe that it is possible to make more than that a page, so they automatically assume anyone who is looking to write an article for someone else is automatically getting paid less than $7 for it.

          As for the F. J. Lovret question... have fun with that one!
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        • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
          Banned
          Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

          I could be wrong here (after all I'm merely a genius
          and not a god)
          , but when I read Rose's post (which
          happens to be geographically located just beneath
          your own) I really thought she was replying to what
          goindeep said, for the most part? :confused:
          Yes you are wrong. Rose quoted MY comments. Don't take it to heart, you have to be flawed to be classed a genius. Or nuts.

          I'd try to get the qualifications for being a god, as being a self-proclaimed genius is obviously taxing you to the limit.


          Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

          ...Also, I would point out that a handful of professional
          writers in a single thread can very well be considered
          to be "many" in many cases?
          A handful is usually interpreted as five. I certainly never counted five.

          And your opinion on what qualifies someone as a "professional writer" can be radically different from others. I lean towards making my judgement in that respect based on the facts in front of me. Judging by the post you've made I wouldn't be in a queue for your services.


          Originally Posted by MikeTucker View Post

          Great, maybe you can help this blind, stupid fool with my current
          article? Can you get me a link to what F. J. Lovret said about how
          to wield a yari and make the switch from chudan to jodan and
          back again? It would save me so much time, because I have
          no idea which issue of the Budo Shinbun it was published in,
          or even what year? Thanks in advance! :rolleyes::p
          Alas, a struggling genius.

          If it's THAT important to you it's a shame you've got nothing better to do with your valuable time than spout nonsense on here.
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          • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            Yes you are wrong. Rose quoted MY comments. Don't take it to heart, you have to be flawed to be classed a genius. Or nuts.
            Definitely the last option... I should know by now
            not to drunk-post, and I sincerely apologize for the
            snarky tone.


            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            I'd try to get the qualifications for being a god, as being a self-proclaimed genius is obviously taxing you to the limit.
            Nah, I could never lower myself to the status of "god".
            But I will cut down on the holy water a bit.


            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            A handful is usually interpreted as five. I certainly never counted five.
            Ah, we are taking "handful" by a literal definition?

            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            And your opinion on what qualifies someone as a "professional writer" can be radically different from others.
            ...But we are not taking "professional" by a literal definition?



            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            I lean towards making my judgement in that respect based on the facts in front of me.
            And the fact that I was a smart-ass toward you for no reason
            in my previous post, that should certainly be a factor as well.


            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            Judging by the post you've made I wouldn't be in a queue for your services.
            I should hope that nobody is holding their breath for
            my services, seeing as how I do not provide any!!



            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            Alas, a struggling genius.

            If it's THAT important to you it's a shame you've got nothing better to do with your valuable time than spout nonsense on here.
            Now for THIS, I do have an important point:
            The Internet is wonderful, but there is a massive amount
            of very, very valuable information that is just not available
            online at all. Therefore, the following quote is as inaccurate
            as it is insulting:


            Originally Posted by Horny Devil View Post

            The internet is now burgeoning with so much information that anyone claiming what they're looking for is unavailable online is (in my opinion) either blind, stupid, or both.
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            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              There may be a little confusion in the thread about the meaning of "professional writer" and that may be partly my fault - sorry. I see that to some people "professional writer", in this context, perfectly reasonably means "someone who sells their writing services to marketers". I wasn't using the words that way, of myself, nor of one or two others who posted here. I'm a professional writer in the sense that I make my living from it by effectively being "my own only client". Apologies for any confusion/ambiguity - not intended at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author Epic Write
    Connect with a community of writers. They can help you for sure. =)
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  • Profile picture of the author mindwire
    I am used to do a quick search on the topic, read 3-4 quickly and break down the main points and arguments on a small note sheet for example. Then when writing, connect those points with each othet, add a little statement and of course do not forget the call-to-action at the end.

    Cheers!
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  • Profile picture of the author DTGeorge
    Originally Posted by Irish802 View Post

    Hello Everyone!

    I have a question....when you have to write an article and you don't know much about the topic, what do you do? Thank you so much.....
    Wikipedia and google.

    I didn't know anything about Dental Imaging or Invisalign aligners before I had to write about them, but by golly I sure was a lot more knowledgeable the day after!

    I'm sure that whatever you're researching, there's detailed information online about it somewhere.

    Wikipedia is one of your best friends, use the footnote links to access more information about the topics.

    Google is your other best friend. Learn how to use Google to get targetted results (e.g. putting quotes around a term to get an exact match) and be willing to look at several pages to find a wide range of information.

    While there is certainly merit in Alexa's "offline" comment for a premium article or investigative report, (And I do LOVE me some Alexa, if it weren't for her I wouldn't be on here) for basic web content it usually isn't necessary.
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  • Profile picture of the author Heathj
    Personally, I use google. The trick is not to rehash what has already been said, but to find the information and then write a coherent structured article.

    For example, I recently wrote a top ten list for most violent cities in America. There are plenty of lists like this out there, but I took bits and pieces from various articles and info sites and made it my own. When finished, my article was very different than any other articles out there. And I did it all with google.

    The other thing to keep in mind is, it can take hours, especially when you are trying to be different than what is already out there.

    My readers will get an article that may have information they could find on the internet, but it will be written in my style, with my flair. My style and flair and useful information that I provide is hopefully why my readers follow me.

    The internet is full of facts and then the words that surround the facts. Make your words unique by presenting the facts differently than anyone else.
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    • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
      Count me in for those like Alexa and Rose who recommend the library. I'm not saying I don't do any research online, if I did, I would be a liar.

      What I always do, however, is follow up at the library and let me tell you what I have found.

      I toss out about 95% of what I found online. The information that I find at the library is always the latest and cutting edge in the topic/field I am writing in as well as the most accurate. A good library keeps up to date with the books/information they provide to their members.

      I've also found the latest updated information online as well. However, in a new book for sale at Amazon or Barnes and Noble, etc., not for free on some random blog. I can utilize that same information, in that same book, for free at the library.

      In my opinion, to poo-poo going to the library, shows your lack of dedication to the client you are writing for and a lack of concern for your own reputation as a quality writer. Did I mention perhaps part laziness?

      Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author katherineolga
    I search for any keywords the client gave me to see what's out there. I'll also do a search on the general topic. If I need to, I'll do my work at the library and read a bit about it offline.
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  • Profile picture of the author NataliaF
    Then you need to research it thoroughly, read what competitors write about the same topic and how they describe the problem with the solution to it. You can also try and ask your customer about some particular issues of their business. For example ask them to provide a short guide on how they accomplish certain service, especially when it is related to House Renovation of things like this.
    I experienced the same problem when writing about Plumbing, Flooring, Roofing issues.
    Do not be afraid to ask questions. There can be sth peculiar about their service you won't find at competitors.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kalanag
    Make an online research, inkluding asking questions on Yahoo answers and compile the various sources to get an unique article or hire an expert writer on guru.com or similar.
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  • Profile picture of the author webpowerguru
    Have you ever considered content curation as a way of boosting your website visitors? Anyone had any experisnce with this?
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  • Profile picture of the author twinkenterprises
    I'd do research at the library to learn about the topic and try to find things that aren't just more information that's freely available online.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Rose Anderson View Post

      Originality is important. But accuracy is also important. This is where many people fail in their online searches. A lot of garbage exists on the internet and you have to be careful where you do your research. Otherwise you end up with article after article repeating the same inaccurate statements.
      Hallelujah, amen, preach it sister!

      Originally Posted by goindeep View Post

      The Internet is by far the Planets greatest source of information that can be read, digested and put to use within mere seconds. Full stop.
      It's also the largest collection of unedited, unadulterated crap the human race has ever built. And most of those who think any research can be done in moments online can seldom tell the difference.

      Originally Posted by Lucian Lada View Post

      Within mere seconds you can buy Kindle books, read them, digest them, and put them to use. And that's one way of seeking information offline, even if they happen to be online.

      Another one is to access Jstor or one's university library which have a lot of books/journals released in electronic version.
      At this point in time, the same argument could be applied to many Kindle books, as they were created by the same "authors" that believe you can do quality research at an article directory in a few minutes.

      As they used to say about the nuclear arms treaties, "trust - but verify". Too many writers more interested in speed are heavy on the former and light on the latter.

      Now using a computer to access a university library is a whole 'nother thing entirely. In fact, I use my local library's website as much or more than the library itself. I can use my (free) library card to access databases that cost hundreds of dollars a month to subscribe to.
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      • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        At this point in time, the same argument could be applied to many Kindle books, as they were created by the same "authors" that believe you can do quality research at an article directory in a few minutes.
        That's one of the problems with Kindle: being an author is just as simple as being a blogger.

        However, I should have specified that the way I use Kindle is sort of a "shortcut" to going to the bookstore/ordering the hard-copy and waiting for it to be delivered/visiting the library, all which take time. Instead, I just buy and read the virtual version of the printed book, which was written with the intention of being sold offline, by a publisher, so that limits the number of authors wanna-be and increases the quality. But even then, before deciding to buying a book one must be sure of its content and not buy what is "featured" or even best-sellers without reading a few trustworthy reviews.

        The only problem is that in some niches these Kindle books, as an alternative to the printed books, are non-existent, so we're back to square one. :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Well luckily the niches i operate in, i already come equipped with the knowledge. Internet marketing, computer repair, and basketball tips/skills are 3 niches that i have a HUGE amount of information on. You should consider starting with a passion of yours, see if the niche exists online, see if there is little-to-no competition, and then enter into the niche and dominate.
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  • Hi Irish802,

    The more time you are willing to familiarize yourself with the topic the better off you'll be composing the article. Takes time and a willingness to dig.

    With deep enough research on and offline one can become knowledgeable enough to write a well accepted article.

    If you try hard enough you can make friends with almost any topic and appreciate writing about it. Some will be tough nuts others will be great fun. You almost can't help experiencing a mix of the two over time.

    Best of luck to you, Irish802.
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  • Profile picture of the author aizaku
    simply research two or four different sources and write your piece around that.

    If not, outsource it to a reputable ghost writer on elance etc...
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  • Profile picture of the author TheWordMagician
    I have found online videos and podcasts by experts to be very useful, too.
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