Wordpress uses too many resources

by Wayne
14 replies
I have my site hosted with Siteground, and in cpanel it shows my cpu time usage is limited to 4000 cpu seconds per hour and 21,600 cpu seconds per day, and also account executions are limited to 3200 programs or scripts per hour and 24000 scripts or programs per day. With my wordpress install my site was exceeding these limitations. So I created my own php scripts and templates so that my site is exactly like it was with wordpress, but now I am not using Wordpress any longer, and my cpu seconds and account executions have dropped dramatically so that I am nowhere near my limit anymore. And my site is much easier to update now with my own php scripts than it was when using wordpress. It took me the last few days to get my scripts and templates created, but now I don't need to worry about siteground giving me any problems for using too many resources and it feels good to be free from Wordpress.
#resources #wordpress
  • Profile picture of the author MartinPlatt
    I've no idea what siteground is, but I wouldn't be using them - if you get into hostgator, you can get low cost hosting without being limited by anything, so why would you?

    The problem isn't wordpress it's your hosting. Yeah, sure you can probably hand code certain aspects of wordpress to make them more efficient, but having to do that to keep your hosting working is ridiculous. What happens when you get more traffic, and once again exceed these limits? That isn't running a business in my eyes.

    Wordpress can be inefficient because anyone can create a plugin, or theme, and there is no performance minimum, other than that people don't use the stuff. So be aware of what you're picking up, monitor it, tune it, use caching, to minimise that sort of thing.

    Do you know the reason why you're limited in such a way, and what benefit you get from this hosting?
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    Martin Platt

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  • Profile picture of the author bhopkins
    Yeh, Wordpress is great, but like any thing else it needs to be optimized. If you install a lot of plugins it will slow down. This does not matter if they are activated or not them just being in the plugin directory steals resources. I've been a host gator customer for years with multiple accounts from shared hosting to dedicated and the only time that they limited me was when I was pushing around 10,000 visitors an hour into one of me shared accounts
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    Bruce

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    • Profile picture of the author Wayne
      You are still limited with resources with Hostgator. I've used Hostgator and Bluehost along with several other hosts in the past, and they all have limits. I prefer Siteground over Hostgator or Bluehost. My sites started out fine with Hostgator and Bluehost when I used them, but after a while they added too many sites to the servers and I had problems with both of them. I think one of the plugins I was using was using a lot of server resources, but creating my own php scripts solved these problems.
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      • Profile picture of the author WillR
        Originally Posted by Wayne View Post

        You are still limited with resources with Hostgator. I've used Hostgator and Bluehost along with several other hosts in the past, and they all have limits. I prefer Siteground over Hostgator or Bluehost. My sites started out fine with Hostgator and Bluehost when I used them, but after a while they added too many sites to the servers and I had problems with both of them. I think one of the plugins I was using was using a lot of server resources, but creating my own php scripts solved these problems.
        Yes, it sounds like it's the things you have added to Wordpress that are the cause of your issues. I have heaps of Wordpress sites running on a shared Hostgator account and they have never had any issues.

        I also have a dedicated Hostgator server but the shared one is fine for a lot of my Wordpress sites.

        The best solution isn't to just move to another host that can cope with your massive requirement of resources, the best thing to do is to instead look at what is causing those issues and get rid of those themes of plugins which in 99% of cases are things that were probably never needed anyway.
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        • Profile picture of the author Wayne
          It's been a while since I have been with Hostgator, so I didn't just move my sites to another host because I was having problems with them. The problems I was having with Hostgator and Bluehost both were too many sites on the server and the server load going very high. When I was with them I didn't have problems with Wordpress but with the server load. I think I would be having the same problems with them if I had the same Wordpress install with them that I had with Siteground.
          But I saw a problem in my cpanel account, and took the steps I needed to correct the problem. I was never contacted by Siteground about any problems, just saw it in cpanel and corrected it. There are still limits with other hosts but most hosts don't show you these limits in your cpanel account like Siteground does. I was creating bigger sites and with Wordpress it was creating problems, I didn't have any problems with Wordpress when my sites were smaller. Creating my own scripts and template use much, much less resources than when using Wordpress. And it has also made it much easier to update my sites now.

          Updating my sites using Wordpress was using a lot of resources, now updating my sites with my custom scripts are using very little resources. The problem was probably with a plugin I was using and not Wordpress, but I needed this plugin to update my sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
    Good for you. Give yourself a pat on the back.
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    :)

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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    If getting rid of Wordpress suits you better then great.

    But how fast or slow a Wordpress site loads is generally down to the person who created it. Wordpress sites can be just as fast as a standard HTML site if they are coded properly. The problem is many themes are coded poorly and people have a habit of installing a heap of unnecessary plugins which are always going to slow things down.
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  • Profile picture of the author run
    It great that you get rid of Wordpress. I couldn't get rid of it at all because it's my potential asset to make money. I'd rather use VPS/Dedicated for more freedom CPU & RAM usage. Honestly, when I use my custom simple light weight php cms, it's very easy to update content & fast loading without consuming lot of resources.

    The time gone, I hate focusing my time on coding, adding module, lack of functions so need to write more codes to add more functions. I'd like to be an entrepreneur rather coder.
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  • Profile picture of the author Wayne
    I just wanted to add that even though my cpanel showed that I was exceeding my limits, my sites still kept working just fine and I was never contacted by Siteground about any problems. Most hosts don't show this information in cpanel, so some of you may also be exceeding your limits and not be aware of it, but they do all have limits if you are on shared hosting. I wanted to do something about it before it did become a problem.

    To give a few more details about my Wordpress install, I'll list the plugins I was using. Anti-spam, BackupBuddy, Contact Form, Header and Footer, Secure WordPress, Spyder Spanker, Wp-Optimizer, WP Indexer, XML Sitemap Feed and WpAllImport. WpAllImport is the one that was causing me to exceed my limits. Using WPAllImport it would take an hour or more to import the feed I was using. I would have had the same problem with any shared host. Creating my own custom script it now takes less than a minute, and I can update my site with one click.
    I guess I should have probably worded the title here a little differently, the plugins you use can make a lot of difference. But my custom php script and template are using much less resources now than when I was using Wordpress, and the site looks exactly the same.
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  • Profile picture of the author MonitorScout
    Reduce the unnecessary plugins.
    Remove related posts plugins
    Optimize your database tables regularly
    Upgrade to WordPress latest version
    Update your plugins
    Use WP Super Cache and W3 Total Cache
    Disabling WP-Cron can drastically reduce CPU-load
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    50 different checks, SNMP monitoring and much more.
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    • Profile picture of the author wordwizard
      A note about Hostgator and their "unlimited" Baby account...

      First, I must say that I generally love Hostgator, and have found them very helpful over the years that I've been with them.

      But their accounts are NOT unlimited.

      First, they will give you grief when you exceed about 100 domain names/sites/add-on domains in your Baby account.

      I asked them, but isn't it supposed to allow unlimited domains? And they answered, well, we don't expect people to have THAT many domains!

      What bad thing can happen if you have too many domains? They might turn off your AWSTATS capability, suggesting you go with Google Analytics.

      Let's not argue for or against Google Analytics here. The point is that I like AWSTATS and wanted to keep it, so I opened another account and started moving domains over there, and so on.

      Plus, then there's the issue of inodes. Basically, inodes are files, and they can be any file that is part of a website, and it also includes emails, with each email being an inode. Plus, the files in the stats software.

      And if you exceed 100,000 inodes, they stop backing up your account! And you'd be surprised how quickly you can reach 100k inodes.

      I've been struggling with this for quite a while.
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      • Profile picture of the author Wayne
        The account I have with Siteground also has unlimited domains and a 150,000 inode limit. However, the majority of people don't have problems with the inode limit unless they are hosting a large static site or a lot of images. My site works mainly off of mysql databases so I have no problems with the inode limit. The problem is when you use too many cpu seconds or script executions in a certain amount of time. I don't currently use any caching which would probably help a great deal, but then that would increase the number of inodes that I am using, each cached file would be another inode. But so far everything is looking good with the changes I have made.
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  • Profile picture of the author icemonkey9
    Just for those recommending a move to hostgator, I got the SAME problem when my site got very popular when hosted with hostgator. It's the failsafe they use ... sure it's "unlimited bandwidth" but not unlimited resources... which to the webmaster is the same darn thing.

    If you are seeing spikes in traffic, that's your problem. If you aren't then there's something going on with one of your plugins or theme that's throwing things off.
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