Be the Expert or Be the Niche?

by lizbot
3 replies
Most of the posts I see about choosing niches, understandably, involve framing yourself as "the expert" so that people will take you seriously. My areas of personal expertise, such as they are, are limited and not particularly engaging and/or readily monetized, so I'm looking elsewhere.

So I'm thinking of starting a blog in a niche where, any other day, I'd be a member of the market. It's a health problem I have, so I know the struggle and have an insight into what others with my issue (at least, the ones like me -- and I know they're out there, because I'm friends with a few of them) are thinking.

I know I still need to research, but I think having the inside track is still valuable. Still, it comes at a cost.

Because I'm grappling with this problem, and I want to be transparent with my readers about that, I can't be the expert. I also can't sugarcoat the challenge. The nature of the niche means there are no easy, immediate fixes, which could potentially make salesmanship of existing products difficult (as they largely claim otherwise). I feel like I owe these people as much help as I can give them which, though honourable, I suspect will result in my earning no money whatsoever.

Until, at least, I'm able to create some products of my own, except that I'm not an expert -- and I'm clear about this -- so who would buy them?

So, yeah. Is it better to pick a niche you know a little about, do some research and jump right in, framing yourself as an expert from the beginning? Or is it better to pick a niche you know a lot about, that you have an emotional stake in, and admitting yourself the n00b?

I guess what I'm asking is, should I pick something I'm less invested in?
#expert #niche #picking a niche
  • Profile picture of the author ymest
    Originally Posted by lizbot View Post

    Most of the posts I see about choosing niches, understandably, involve framing yourself as "the expert" so that people will take you seriously. My areas of personal expertise, such as they are, are limited and not particularly engaging and/or readily monetized, so I'm looking elsewhere.

    Your areas of expertise might have ties with other ones that are more likely to make you some money, so you definitely want to do some more research. Narrow down all the possibilities...you'll find some nuggets for sure!


    So I'm thinking of starting a blog in a niche where, any other day, I'd be a member of the market. It's a health problem I have, so I know the struggle and have an insight into what others with my issue (at least, the ones like me -- and I know they're out there, because I'm friends with a few of them) are thinking.
    I know I still need to research, but I think having the inside track is still valuable. Still, it comes at a cost.

    Use whatever you already know. Since you seem to have some insight into this problem, you can add value and help others and at the same time, make some money. Research is a MUST even for seasoned marketers, ( or any other job for that matter!)

    Because I'm grappling with this problem, and I want to be transparent with my readers about that, I can't be the expert. I also can't sugarcoat the challenge. The nature of the niche means there are no easy, immediate fixes, which could potentially make salesmanship of existing products difficult (as they largely claim otherwise). I feel like I owe these people as much help as I can give them which, though honourable, I suspect will result in my earning no money whatsoever.
    At least you are being very honest here. You can't force people to BUY MIRACLE CURES anyway. You can advise, share your experience and add value. You don't know until you've tried. Take action, try and see for yourself. You might be surprised. Give it a go.



    Until, at least, I'm able to create some products of my own, except that I'm not an expert -- and I'm clear about this -- so who would buy them?
    Anyone who can relate to your problem. Also, bear in mind that you don't have to be an expert to do some business. What is an expert anyway? It's very subjective. Do some more research and JUMP RIGHT IN! Again, don't OVER THINK things!


    So, yeah. Is it better to pick a niche you know a little about, do some research and jump right in, framing yourself as an expert from the beginning? Or is it better to pick a niche you know a lot about, that you have an emotional stake in, and admitting yourself the n00b?
    If you pick something you're not interested in just because it's likely to make money, you won't get far. You are likely to give up at some point. I don't pick my niches because they have better prospects. I choose to work on what I like, otherwise it doesn't make sense, to me at least.

    I guess what I'm asking is, should I pick something I'm less invested in?
    No. Do what you feel is right...don't do anything because you've been told that it's a proven niche . Share your knowledge. Add value. Help others. You'll be surprised how things turn out sometimes. Give it a try. And, don't give up!
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by lizbot View Post

    So, yeah. Is it better to pick a niche you know a little about, do some research and jump right in, framing yourself as an expert from the beginning? Or is it better to pick a niche you know a lot about, that you have an emotional stake in, and admitting yourself the n00b?
    Either can work.

    I think that picking a niche you know a lot about as a "customer", that you have an emotional stake in, can work very successfully. The "personal touch" and the "speaking from experience" are something that many people like, want and identify with, and in marketing terms that can easily be worth as much as "professional expertise".

    They're very different approaches. But especially if there are products which have helped you (not necessarily "cured" you or "fully solved the problem" for you), and you can recommend them as an affiliate, that carries plenty of credibility.

    Originally Posted by lizbot View Post

    I guess what I'm asking is, should I pick something I'm less invested in?
    You may have other reasons for wanting to do that(?), but from the potential marketing perspective, I don't think you necessarily should, no.
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  • Profile picture of the author cheddarben
    Originally Posted by lizbot View Post

    Most of the posts I see about choosing niches, understandably, involve framing yourself as "the expert" so that people will take you seriously. My areas of personal expertise, such as they are, are limited and not particularly engaging and/or readily monetized, so I'm looking elsewhere.

    So I'm thinking of starting a blog in a niche where, any other day, I'd be a member of the market. It's a health problem I have, so I know the struggle and have an insight into what others with my issue (at least, the ones like me -- and I know they're out there, because I'm friends with a few of them) are thinking.

    I know I still need to research, but I think having the inside track is still valuable. Still, it comes at a cost.

    Because I'm grappling with this problem, and I want to be transparent with my readers about that, I can't be the expert. I also can't sugarcoat the challenge. The nature of the niche means there are no easy, immediate fixes, which could potentially make salesmanship of existing products difficult (as they largely claim otherwise). I feel like I owe these people as much help as I can give them which, though honourable, I suspect will result in my earning no money whatsoever.

    Until, at least, I'm able to create some products of my own, except that I'm not an expert -- and I'm clear about this -- so who would buy them?

    So, yeah. Is it better to pick a niche you know a little about, do some research and jump right in, framing yourself as an expert from the beginning? Or is it better to pick a niche you know a lot about, that you have an emotional stake in, and admitting yourself the n00b?

    I guess what I'm asking is, should I pick something I'm less invested in?
    So, yeah. Is it better to pick a niche you know a little about, do some research and jump right in, framing yourself as an expert from the beginning? Or is it better to pick a niche you know a lot about, that you have an emotional stake in, and admitting yourself the n00b?
    In terms of loyal visitors and long term viability... I would pick the topic you know alot about. I think it is more difficult to build traffic like that, but you can build a real, long term, very profitable community that way. The kind of community that really adds value to for them and perhaps you.
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