Small, But Vital Tip for More Response In Your Emails

15 replies
If you want to build a relationship with your
readers - then this is perhaps one of the most important lessons.

When you write to your subscribers - imagine you are
having a conversation with just one person and not to a whole group.

Always address your subscriber as "you" in all your emails.

Don't say things like, "some of you," "all of you" or
anything that indicates your writing to a group.

Make your subscriber feel like you're writing only to him (or her)

Sure - your subscribers aren't dumb and know
that you have other subscribers -- but just
changing the way you write can have a profound effect.

Try it and you'll see that it works like a charm!
#emails #response #small #tip #vital
  • Profile picture of the author sminozzi
    Good Tip. Thank You.
    Bill
    SiteRightAway
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  • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
    Your welcome Bill

    Glad you found it helpful.
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  • Profile picture of the author pdrs
    this is only my experience, and every list is different, but for one of my lists, I get almost double the open rate when I start an email with Hey Guys as opposed to Hey Name.

    I think it largely depends on how you've interacted with your list from the start.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Burnett
      Originally Posted by MKCookins View Post

      If you want to build a relationship with your
      readers - then this is perhaps one of the most important lessons.

      When you write to your subscribers - imagine you are
      having a conversation with just one person and not to a whole group.

      Always address your subscriber as "you" in all your emails.

      Don't say things like, "some of you," "all of you" or
      anything that indicates your writing to a group.

      Make your subscriber feel like you're writing only to him (or her)

      Sure - your subscribers aren't dumb and know
      that you have other subscribers -- but just
      changing the way you write can have a profound effect.

      Try it and you'll see that it works like a charm!
      Thanks for the tip

      Originally Posted by pdrs View Post

      this is only my experience, and every list is different, but for one of my lists, I get almost double the open rate when I start an email with Hey Guys as opposed to Hey Name.

      I think it largely depends on how you've interacted with your list from the start.
      That's interesting... I guess you just have to test your list until you find what works.
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      • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
        Originally Posted by wealthyseven View Post

        Thanks for the tip.
        You're welcome

        Originally Posted by pdrs View Post

        this is only my experience, and every list is different, but for one of my lists, I get almost double the open rate when I start an email with Hey Guys as opposed to Hey Name.
        This is interesting...

        I guess as long as you are providing massive value and subscribers know you have their best interest at heart you can word you're emails this way.
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    • Profile picture of the author WillR
      Originally Posted by pdrs View Post

      this is only my experience, and every list is different, but for one of my lists, I get almost double the open rate when I start an email with Hey Guys as opposed to Hey Name.
      Well if you actually think about it, using their first name like that is far less personal. How many times do you email your close family or friends and start the email with "Hello [Fathers Name]". I never do. I might just say "Hi" or even just get straight into the message. That's what we do when emailing close people because it doesn't need to be formal. So by adding the first name into your subject line or email, you are making the email feel less personal and more corporate like. That's why I never collect names anymore.

      Your email should just start with "Hi" rather than "Hi John". They know you are not sending the email manually to just them so I've never understood who people think they are kidding when they use the first names. Get rid of em I say!
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  • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
    Over the years, I've traveled to a lot of seminars and live
    events. I now have a display near my desk with lots of photos
    taken with people at these events. I often focus on one of those
    photos as I'm composing an email... so that I really "am" talking
    to just one person.

    I also use an email app/plug-in called Rapportive. When I open
    an email, in my Gmail account, Rapportive pulls in data from
    across the internet (social media profiles, etc.) and show me
    photos, and various bits of data about the sender of a given
    email. When composing emails, or newsletters, I often focus
    on datat that Rapportive provides me to remind me that I really
    am dealing with individuals rather than "a list." It makes a
    huge difference for me.

    Willie
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      Michael,

      When I'm sending an email to an individual (like a welcome email or a thank you for some action they've taken) then I agree with what you're saying although I prefer to merge a first name into the conversation rather than saying "you."

      But as pdrs said above, there are times when I have gotten a much better response using a "group" name. I often use "friends" for example.

      When I'm sending a newsletter or a broadcast email to all subscribers they know and realize that they aren't the only ones receiving the email. They are not offended by being included in a group. In fact, I personally like being included as part of a larger audience in some circles - especially those where commonalities define who we are in a particular setting.

      As always, try different approaches and see what works best for you. Scrap the failures, refine the successes, then ramp up your reach!

      Good luck to you,

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by pdrs View Post

    this is only my experience, and every list is different, but for one of my lists, I get almost double the open rate when I start an email with Hey Guys as opposed to Hey Name.

    I think it largely depends on how you've interacted with your list from the start.
    Agree.

    People have been seeking and joining herds since before the dawn of language, much less email.

    As much as people like that 'personal' connection, at times they also crave the feeling of belonging to an exclusive group. If they've joined your list to be part of your group, then addressing them in a way that reassures their belonging makes sense.

    On the other hand, as more than one person above mentioned, if the communication is indeed a one-on-one, such as a welcome or thank you email or such, then using the individual address (including judicious and sparing use of their name) is appropriate and likely to evoke a positive response.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ty Spiller
    Couldn't agree more! It's very impotant to have a strong and professional relationship with your list!

    Ty Spiller
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  • The subject of the email is often overlooked but is such a vital part of the email. In order to start the conversation you really need to focus on the subject of the email and inspire someone to open the email and start reading it first, then of course the rest needs to be addressed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stuart Walker
    Originally Posted by Jack Samatha View Post

    In My experience, i normally email to my list once every two day and most time put the word FREE in the subject. So now whenever they find an email from me, they rush to open it. Anyways that's my opinion...
    Brilliant, just chuck the word 'FREE' into every email headline....and then end up with a list full of people who always expect free stuff and become reluctant to buy. :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
    Originally Posted by Willie Crawford View Post

    I also use an email app/plug-in called Rapportive. When I open
    an email, in my Gmail account, Rapportive pulls in data from
    across the internet (social media profiles, etc.) and show me
    photos, and various bits of data about the sender of a given
    email. When composing emails, or newsletters, I often focus
    on datat that Rapportive provides me to remind me that I really
    am dealing with individuals rather than "a list." It makes a
    huge difference for me.Willie
    Thanks for this information about the plug in Willie -- This really can make a huge difference when writing your emails.

    We can really understand the person we are talking to and connect with them on a more personal level.


    Originally Posted by RockingLastsForever View Post

    Brilliant, just chuck the word 'FREE' into every email headline....and then end up with a list full of people who always expect free stuff and become reluctant to buy. :rolleyes:
    Exactly this -- while you will get a high open rate you will not get many sales when you promote a product.

    Change your titles that give real value like "how to emails" and you will still get a high open rate and not have a list of freebie seekers

    Originally Posted by WillR View Post

    Your email should just start with "Hi" rather than "Hi John". They know you are not sending the email manually to just them so I've never understood who people think they are kidding when they use the first names. Get rid of em I say!
    This is Excellent advice Will!

    It is true when we write emails to friends or family members we rarely use their name and start out with "hey", or "hows it going."

    I think in email marketing we should only seldom use their first name like in the welcome email then every so often after that... NOT every time.
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  • Profile picture of the author madein
    Originally Posted by MKCookins View Post

    If you want to build a relationship with your
    readers - then this is perhaps one of the most important lessons.

    When you write to your subscribers - imagine you are
    having a conversation with just one person and not to a whole group.

    Always address your subscriber as "you" in all your emails.

    Don't say things like, "some of you," "all of you" or
    anything that indicates your writing to a group.

    Make your subscriber feel like you're writing only to him (or her)

    Sure - your subscribers aren't dumb and know
    that you have other subscribers -- but just
    changing the way you write can have a profound effect.

    Try it and you'll see that it works like a charm!
    Yes! I totally agree, the personal touch adds a lot to a cta.
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    • Profile picture of the author M Thompson
      First off rapportive is good..especially if you hook it into aweber, it's always good to know which (of your own) lists people are on before you email them.

      Early in my email sequences i will talk to an individual and address that individual.. BUT once the relationship is built and they are maybe on a buyers list then I go for the whole group experience.

      Things like.. "Look i know you guys hate XXX but if you use it with YYY it's an unbeatable combination."

      My demographic tends to be 45+ so i can't go too wild with things like ....

      Hey Dude... How's the shizzle (whatever the hell that means)

      But I can go hard on.. "I used to love saturday evening, Happy Days Followed by starsky and Hutch"

      I believe It's more important to address your list in terms they can relate to and cultural references that mean something than anything else.
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