What are the Cons of Wordpress?

90 replies
What are the cons of wordpress in creating a site?.
#cons #wordpress
  • Profile picture of the author CyberAlien
    That depends on the type of website you're trying to create. For example, if you're creating a blog then it would have very few cons and use it with almost no plugins. If you're trying to run an entire MMORPG off it, you're going to hit quite a few cons and might as well have the entire website custom coded.
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  • Profile picture of the author PaidAllDay
    The cons are that it's slow. Much slower than straight HTML from a good developer that knows how to write light weight code and optimize pages for speed. It also boxes you into a series of plugins and templates so it's not as versatile as hand written code.

    With that being said I would recommend wordpress for just about any site you want to build because it's reliable, receives updates on a regular basis, and despite the fact it's not as versatile as HTML, there are still TONS of resources available for it.

    You can get over the page speed issues by choosing a good, fast loading theme like Swift and hosting it on a host that knows wordpress and optimizes their server for it. The best hosting provider I've found for WordPress is zippykid.com.
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    • Profile picture of the author kpmedia
      Originally Posted by PaidAllDay View Post

      The cons are that it's slow. Much slower than straight HTML .
      Only if the host sucks, and you're not caching it.

      I've been using WP since 2007, before most people had even heard of it.
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      • Profile picture of the author keyon
        One of the reasons I left WP is that I discovered a lot of themes and plugins I had installed (both free and paid versions) were loaded with somewhat "hidden" code -- things like web links, supposedly to the author, although I always questioned that (I kind of had the feeling that maybe the themes and plugins were part of a link-farm operation).
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        • Profile picture of the author RobinInTexas
          Originally Posted by keyon View Post

          One of the reasons I left WP is that I discovered a lot of themes and plugins I had installed (both free and paid versions) were loaded with somewhat "hidden" code -- things like web links, supposedly to the author, although I always questioned that (I kind of had the feeling that maybe the themes and plugins were part of a link-farm operation).
          I tend to stay with free themes and plugins from the WordPress.org repository and never have a problem with web links or hidden code. They have been thoroughly scrutinized and are clean. And for the most part work.

          While many paid ones are buggy and have lots of obfuscated code.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by ilynreal View Post

    What are the Cons of Wordpress?
    1. Very difficult to learn to use well, compared with most of its competitors

    2. Requires regular updating and (as can be seen from thread discussions here) the updates can cause significant compatibility and other problems

    3. Plug-ins can be a real resource-hog but it seems you can't do a lot without them

    4. There are obviously some common speed issues which can be circumvented only by "special knowledge/experience"

    5. Unless you spend real money and/or are a masterful user, the end result tends to look "like WordPress" (i.e. it's not necessarily ideal for someone who "wants something a bit different")

    6. As can be seen from many of the thread discussions here, wanting to change/customize things (which in other CMS's would be trivial and take only seconds) can turn out to be hugely complicated and requiring a deep understanding of something called "CSS" (whatever the hell that is) and a PhD in mechanical engineering

    7. Obvious security issues and hacking problems, maybe partly just because it's so widely used that it's the one the hackers are brought up on, which again (you guessed it) can be circumvented only with some real inconvenience and by "special knowledge/experience"

    Just my perspective, as someone who sees the many, considerable advantages of WordPress, would like to use it, has read the whole of both "WordPress for Dummies" and "Blogging for Dummies", has struggled with it on and off over the years, has never managed to use it successfully, and has now more-or-less given up with it - yet again.
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    • Profile picture of the author ilynreal
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      1. Very difficult to learn to use well, compared with most of its competitors

      2. Requires regular updating and (as can be seen from thread discussions here) the updates can cause significant compatibility and other problems

      3. Plug-ins can be a real resource-hog but it seems you can't do a lot without them

      4. There are obviously some common speed issues which can be circumvented only by "special knowledge/experience"

      5. Unless you spend real money and/or are a masterful user, the end result tends to look "like WordPress" (i.e. it's not necessarily ideal for someone who "wants something a bit different")

      6. As can be seen from many of the thread discussions here, wanting to change/customize things (which in other CMS's would be trivial and take only seconds) can turn out to be hugely complicated and requiring a deep understanding of something called "CSS" (whatever the hell that is) and a PhD in mechanical engineering

      7. Obvious security issues and hacking problems, maybe partly just because it's so widely used that it's the one the hackers are brought up on, which again (you guessed it) can be circumvented only with some real inconvenience and by "special knowledge/experience"

      Just my perspective, as someone who sees the many, considerable advantages of WordPress, would like to use it, has read the whole of both "WordPress for Dummies" and "Blogging for Dummies", has struggled with it on and off over the years, has never managed to use it successfully, and has now more-or-less given up with it. :rolleyes:
      so do you think using a website builder is an option?
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by ilynreal View Post

        so do you think using a website builder is an option?
        I think it depends what you mean by "website builder" (I never quite know what people mean by this. It seems to me to depend on one's understanding of the difference between a "content management system" and a "website builder". I think WordPress is a "website builder", in one sense, but what do I know? It's also almost universally described as a "CMS".)

        If you don't want made-from-raw-HTML sites, I think Weebly Pro is good, and underrated, and (contrary to what many people say about it, presumably thinking of their "free service" and wrongly imagining that it's "like Blogger") it's also a good and reliable host.

        I'm very impressed with what I see of Squarespace, too, though I haven't yet quite plucked up the courage to try it, myself. Maybe next time ... (it's obviously a whole lot easier than WordPress and I have it on good authority that it's also far more secure, overall).

        However, given all the outstanding advantages of WordPress, which you (perhaps pointedly? ) haven't asked about, I think one would need really compelling reasons not to use it, and I suspect that my own assessment of its disadvantages aren't compelling enough, for most people. (I have compelling reasons, myself: I'm technophobic and incompetent, and have tried and failed with it! But most people seem to manage. ).
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          One of the biggest cons I see is often described as one of the major pros - the availability of almost unlimited plugins and themes.

          It makes people lose focus, spending valuable time and energy looking for just the exact right theme and plugins to make WP turn somersaults with no effort.

          Go through just this forum and count the number of threads asking for specific niche themes, as if that will make content and marketing suddenly appear.

          The other con often touted as a pro is the fact that WP is free and has a one-click install. You see people going through all the hoops to set up a database, choose a theme (and, again, it has to be the mythical perfect theme), and putting up a one-page site. Grab a template from a site like http://www.oswd.org, plug it into an html editor, and put up a lightning fast, secure page instead.
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by Thriftypreneur View Post

          I'm not sure where in my post I said that "Wordpress is absolutely ideal for non-techies."
          Well, let's see what you said ...
          Originally Posted by Thriftypreneur View Post

          If you're not a "techie," then Wordpress is right up your alley. Wordpress was designed specifically to cater to the "non-techie" crowd.
          Ok, I paraphrased you very slightly rather than quoting directly, just above, and I apologize if you felt my paraphrasal changed the meaning, which wasn't my intention.

          I changed the words "right up your alley" to "absolutely ideal". It seemed to me (and still does) that they convey basically the same meaning. Sorry about that, if you feel otherwise. I should have "quoted" rather than re-wording, I can see.

          Originally Posted by Thriftypreneur View Post

          If you show me where I said that, I'll happily remove that from my post because that's not what I was trying to say.
          No need at all - you were giving your opinion, just as I was giving mine. After all I've been through with WordPress over the years, including reading widely accredited books about it, I did feel entitled to do that.

          Originally Posted by Thriftypreneur View Post

          But, to point fingers at me and laugh, while bashing the Wordpress platform is a little uncalled for.
          Things often come across here as more seriously/aggressively intended than they were. I apologize if my tone was over the top.

          For the record, I did also say this, you know? ...

          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          However, given all the outstanding advantages of WordPress, which you (perhaps pointedly? ) haven't asked about, I think one would need really compelling reasons not to use it, and I suspect that my own assessment of its disadvantages aren't compelling enough, for most people.
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            As I see it, Wordpress is one of those applications like MS Word. Most people won't touch 90% of the capabilities it offers, and that's fine.

            If you never go further than the one-click install, premade themes and plugins, the techie part is pretty simple. Until those components decide not to play nice, in which case you have problems.

            If you dig in, there's room for the power user to make the application do some amazing things.

            I don't consider myself a power user. More of an intermediate. But between the Codex, the Wordpress forums, and a few trusted sources, I can make WP do pretty much what I want it to do.

            A lot of the troubles people have with WP can be traced to trying to make the platform do things it was never intended to do, and having to rely on others to make it work.
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    • Profile picture of the author CyberSEO
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      1. Very difficult to learn to use well, compared with most of its competitors
      You must be kidding, right?
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  • Profile picture of the author flmaec
    it is difficult to use and customized.
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  • Profile picture of the author xu1
    Word press is my favourite. Other than the dozens of free plugins and hundreds inf not thousands of free themes. I use it 98% over static html sites.
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    • Profile picture of the author davehayes
      Originally Posted by xu1 View Post

      Word press is my favourite. Other than the dozens of free plugins and hundreds inf not thousands of free themes. I use it 98% over static html sites.
      I have to agree with this, WP is way and above my favourite site for all the reasons mentioned above. Nothing else comes even close & I have used a few in my time!

      Applied Education is the difference
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  • Profile picture of the author khooster1
    The main issue with Wordpress is its security system.
    There are many cases of sites being easily hacked into.

    Depending on your needs, Wordpress should be
    Able to meet most of our needs..

    Not recommending Wordpress for content management site
    Such as membership sites.
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    • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
      I've been a huge fan of Wordpress for many years and I've never found it difficult to understand and work with. Maybe I began (and continue) the right way and leaned heavily upon the Wordpress Codex, which explains every concept of what I've needed to accomplish in detail.

      I think many of the slowness complaints arise from people adding countless and unnecessary plugins willy-nilly. There are always people here asking what are the best plugins and more than likely add everything recommended irrespective of their purpose.

      It's also a fact that many plugins are completely redundant; the same results can often be achieved with with a little learned knowledge and programming tweaks. Aren't programming tweaks necessary no matter what programming is implemented?

      Also, I've only once had a website hacked, and strangely enough it was a site written in straight HTML. I've never had hacking issues with any of my numerous Wordpress sites.
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      • Profile picture of the author entry
        It has a large learning curve, unless you have knowledge prior to it.
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      • Profile picture of the author mraffiliate
        1- From personal experience the problems I had with WordPress is that you have to always rely on the the developers of the themes and plugins to update their products so that they stay compatible with the new versions of WordPress.

        2- Sometimes you will purchase a WordPress theme, build your site, and the theme developer decides to stop updating the theme and when a new version of WordPress comes out you will most likely have compatibility issues.

        3- If you purchase your theme from a company that offers a monthly fee to access all their themes and you decide to cancel your membership, you may be blocked from receiving updates from the themes that you have already purchased. I ran into this problem when I cancelled my membership to Elegant themes.

        4- If the type of site you are creating requires a lot of different plugins, you are almost assured of having compatibility issues.

        I have moved my sites back over to HTML because of its simplicity, fast loading speeds, and no compatibility issues. HTML5 is out now and I have sites running on HTML 2 and have never had any issues with the old version.
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    • Profile picture of the author DeborahDera
      I just had a website hacked. It was an older site and I had't updated WordPress. I couldn't update Wordpress because my MySQL database was not 5.0 or higher and didn't support the newer versions (the site was older...).

      Took forever to get the host to help me figure out how to upgrade/transition the database. If my site had been updated, it likely wouldn't have been as easily hacked. My fault for not taking action sooner, but there are definite security issues.

      Originally Posted by khooster1 View Post

      The main issue with Wordpress is its security system.
      There are many cases of sites being easily hacked into.

      Depending on your needs, Wordpress should be
      Able to meet most of our needs..

      Not recommending Wordpress for content management site
      Such as membership sites.
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    • Profile picture of the author PongSet
      Originally Posted by khooster1 View Post

      The main issue with Wordpress is its security system.
      There are many cases of sites being easily hacked into.

      Depending on your needs, Wordpress should be
      Able to meet most of our needs..

      Not recommending Wordpress for content management site
      Such as membership sites.
      WordPress Core is Secure – Stop Telling People Otherwise | WordPress Hosting by @WPEngine
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        For those too lazy to actually read this, here's the important part:

        Many of the security problems WP users experience are self-inflicted.

        If you really want to join the crowd ranting about WP being insecure, do the following:

        > Install WP using the Fantastico one-click install. Be sure to accept all default settings.

        > Load in those plug-ins, regardless of source. If it sounds cools, load it on.

        > Learn to ignore all update notices, either WP itself or plugins.

        > Never visit your own sites and check on performance. Hackers like to operate in the shadows, and you watching them may make them nervous enough to pick someone else.

        > Oh, yeah, almost forgot one of the most important things. Make sure you pick short, easy passwords and never change them. If hacking you is too much work, hackers will give someone else the privilege of whining about them...

        :p
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        • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
          the single most important con is: security. Because it is so widely used, it is the target of many hackers.

          If you don't know how to do basic security fixes in your cPanel apart from WordPress - you are still leaving yourself vulnerable - don't just rely on WordPress security plugins to do the job.

          despite all the precautions one can do to prevent attacks, you're still going to find visitors trying to get in. Check your server logs regularily - it definitely is an eye-opener.
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by Karen Blundell View Post

            If you don't know how to do basic security fixes in your cPanel apart from WordPress - you are still leaving yourself vulnerable - don't just rely on WordPress security plugins to do the job.
            Relying on security plugins is like installing an alarm system in your store and then posting the schematics in your front window. It might keep out the honest people or the opportunists, but it creates a false sense of security when dealing with pros.
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  • Profile picture of the author Amod Oke
    The main issue with Wordpress is its security system.
    There are many cases of sites being easily hacked into.
    The biggest con without doubt... but you can 'save' your sites by using a service such www.codeguard.com or www.vaultpress.com

    Yet other cons:
    1) You're stuck with running php code even if all you want is a static website.

    2) The MySql database can get absolutely trashy and bogged down with wp + plugins + themes + faulty uninstalls, etc.

    3) You can (and mostly WILL) hit complete dead ends with blank white pages one random day! Go figure what went wrong by browsing thousands of threads on the wp forums!! (while big G throws your serp rankings back to page 10 for a 'blank site'!)

    4) Many old plugins are security vulnerability gardens

    But on the other hand... most of my sites ARE wp!
    The pros outweigh all the cons by miles!
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  • Profile picture of the author online only
    10 year old can make a proper site out of it.
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  • Profile picture of the author ilynreal
    Ok I want o create a local celebrity site with forum,chat,poll. i want my site with poll or something. Iv'e tried to use mybb forum because i can't afford to pay the license of vbulletin, but mybb don't have what i wanted and has a lack of features, i am not a techie person. So i think wordpress can do that. But the problem is wordpress is easily hackable or i thought. So if my sites gets hack its a big problem i don't know how to protect my site. In my understanding website builder will be there for you if your sites gets hacked, that what i understand.
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    • Profile picture of the author Thriftypreneur
      Originally Posted by ilynreal View Post

      Ok I want o create a local celebrity site with forum,chat,poll. i want my site with poll or something. Iv'e tried to use mybb forum because i can't afford to pay the license of vbulletin, but mybb don't have what i wanted and has a lack of features, i am not a techie person. So i think wordpress can do that. But the problem is wordpress is easily hackable or i thought. So if my sites gets hack its a big problem i don't know how to protect my site. In my understanding website builder will be there for you if your sites gets hacked, that what i understand.
      Some of the largest sites in the world are running on Wordpress. You shouldn't be paranoid about getting hacked just because you're running Wordpress. There are free security plugins you can install that will thwart 99% of the hacking attempts you're likely, or unlikely, to encounter.

      If you're not a "techie," then Wordpress is right up your alley. Wordpress was designed specifically to cater to the "non-techie" crowd.

      As for your forum needs, you can look into the following three:
      1. bbPress - a forum designed to run on Wordpress.
      http://bbpress.org/

      2. Simple Machines - A free, powerful, standalone, open-source forum software.
      http://www.simplemachines.org/

      3. phpBB - Another, extremely popular, open-source forum software.
      https://www.phpbb.com/

      Hope that helps, good luck.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Thriftypreneur View Post

        Wordpress was designed specifically to cater to the "non-techie" crowd.
        LOL - if that's so, then I'd certainly hate to try and use anything that was designed for "techies".

        This forum is full of thread after thread after thread in which Warriors with far greater technical skills and experience than I'll ever have run into apparently insuperable problems with WordPress in everyday situations involving the simplest things which I know that even an ignoramus like me can resolve on her own sites in 2 minutes. And those threads get more and more complicated and surreal and bizarre, with misunderstanding increasingly heaped upon misinformation, until some true expert like Anne Pottinger or Istvan Horvath puts in a special guest appearance with the correct answer and settles the issue (albeit sometimes with great patience and over a long series of related posts). I can't begin to tell you how many threads I've read here which make remind myself how very glad I am that, after a lot of trial and error, I decided not to use WordPress after all. I'm "just saying" ...

        Don't get me wrong: I'm not questioning at all its suitability for large numbers of people.

        But if people try to tell me that it's "absolutely ideal for non-techies", then they're going to get heckled, because that just isn't true.
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        • Profile picture of the author LilBlackDress
          I personally found WordPress super easy to learn. I was shocked at how easy it was. Just click to put it on a site, another click for theme and plug ins.
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        • Profile picture of the author Thriftypreneur
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          LOL - if that's so, I'd certainly hate to try and use anything that was designed for "techies".

          This forum is full of thread after thread after thread in which Warriors with far greater technical skills and experience than I'll ever have run into apparently insuperable problems with WordPress in everyday situations involving the simplest things which I know that even an ignoramus like me can resolve on her own sites in 2 minutes. And those threads get more and more complicated and surreal and bizarre, with misunderstanding increasingly heaped upon misinformation, until some true expert like Anne Pottinger or Istvan Horvath puts in a special guest appearance with the correct answer and settles the issue (albeit sometimes with great patience and over a long series of related posts). I can't begin to tell you how many threads I've read here which make remind myself how very glad I am that, after a lot of trial and error, I decided not to use WordPress. I'm "just saying" ...

          Don't get me wrong: I'm not questioning at all its suitability for large numbers of people. But if people try to tell me that it's "absolutely ideal for non-techies", then they're going to get heckled.
          I'm not sure where in my post I said that "Wordpress is absolutely ideal for non-techies." If you show me where I said that, I'll happily remove that from my post because that's not what I was trying to say.

          I did, however, say that it was "specifically designed to cater to non-techies." Which, it was. If you find the software difficult to use, I'm sorry. But it was designed to be a viable alternative to leaning and coding by hand, which, for the most part, it has been successful in doing.

          If you don't like or use Wordpress, that's cool, I respect your choice and your preference. But, to point fingers at me and laugh, while bashing the Wordpress platform, is a little uncalled for.
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        • Profile picture of the author DTGeorge
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          LOL - if that's so, then I'd certainly hate to try and use anything that was designed for "techies".

          This forum is full of thread after thread after thread in which Warriors with far greater technical skills and experience than I'll ever have run into apparently insuperable problems with WordPress in everyday situations involving the simplest things which I know that even an ignoramus like me can resolve on her own sites in 2 minutes. And those threads get more and more complicated and surreal and bizarre, with misunderstanding increasingly heaped upon misinformation, until some true expert like Anne Pottinger or Istvan Horvath puts in a special guest appearance with the correct answer and settles the issue (albeit sometimes with great patience and over a long series of related posts). I can't begin to tell you how many threads I've read here which make remind myself how very glad I am that, after a lot of trial and error, I decided not to use WordPress after all. I'm "just saying" ...

          Don't get me wrong: I'm not questioning at all its suitability for large numbers of people.

          But if people try to tell me that it's "absolutely ideal for non-techies", then they're going to get heckled, because that just isn't true.
          May I perhaps posit that the reason that there are so many people complaining about Wordpress is due in large part to the sheer amount of people USING wordpress? Along with the gazillion different plugins that many people simply don't know how to use?

          Personally, I've found Wordpress relatively easy (and in some cases intuitive) to use. I would say, however, it would depend highly on the theme and plugins that you're using, which isn't necessarily the fault of wordpress itself.


          But if people try to tell me that it's "absolutely ideal for non-techies", then they're going to get heckled, because that just isn't true.
          My my, such a subjective statement Alexa! However, I won't disagree with you for the simple fact that I've never used Weebly (although I did have a go with Blogger) and therefore I can't give a truly unbiased comparison.
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          • Profile picture of the author medway
            Probably the security flaws in some of the plugins, you'll need to keep it updated.

            If possible I prefer to use HTML now to keep things simple. I've wasted hours figuring out small WP bugs.

            If you need lots of functionality, however, it can also be a great time saver compared to coding something yourself.
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            • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
              Originally Posted by medway View Post

              Probably the security flaws in some of the plugins, you'll need to keep it updated.

              If possible I prefer to use HTML now to keep things simple. I've wasted hours figuring out small WP bugs.

              If you need lots of functionality, however, it can also be a great time saver compared to coding something yourself.
              Relying too much on plugins will cause a multitude of problems, and one of the biggest is indeed security. Because WP is open source, hackers love it. Nothing like trying to break into a house when you have the blueprints and a schematic of the security system. Even the updates to the security are right there.

              I got rid of a lot of my problems when I spent a little time learning to hack basic theme templates to add features and functionality rather than hunting for another plugin. For example, with a tiny bit of knowledge (how to copy and paste), you don't need a plugin to insert an opt-in form, add static links to a footer or add a banner or text ad.

              There are tons of secure perl and php scripts out there which will negate the need for many plugins, leaving you with a safer, more efficient website.
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  • Profile picture of the author thedanbrown
    Really depends what you're using it for. If you have no technical experience I would recommend Wordpress without a doubt. But if you want to make a customized social network or something ya it's not right for that. It's a blogging platform essentially but you can find themes and plugins to do next to ALMOST anything you want to do.
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  • Profile picture of the author troy23
    I build sites with Wordpress, Blogger, Weebly and straight html
    I like Wordpress because of the flexibility it gives me.
    An out of date plugin can cause problems and hackers seem to target Wordpress these days. I would advise to limit the plugins you use. Stick to the main recommended ones. I'm sure Wordpress will be replaced in a few years, but for now it serves me well.
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  • Profile picture of the author avajo71
    Compared to coding the website yourself from scratch, Wordpress is the easier to use if you want to develop a professional looking website. It is very flexible and have so many features. You can even hide its "Wordpress" attribute. And moreover it is free.
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    • Profile picture of the author ashloren
      Originally Posted by avajo71 View Post

      Compared to coding the website yourself from scratch, Wordpress is the easier to use if you want to develop a professional looking website.
      It is...? Seriously?

      Uh, I dunno, but...

      <html>
      <head><title>My Website</title></head>
      <body><h1>Welcome to My Website!</h1>
      <p>I wrote this all by myself. Look mom, no hands (or Wordpress!)</p></body>
      </html>

      That seems far simpler to me and I hand coded it myself.
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      • Profile picture of the author RitaWrites
        I personally like WordPress but thinking back to the beginning I can think of one main con - it did take me time to learn everything about it and to get completely comfortable using it. It can also be slow, but there are some things that you can change to speed it up.
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      • Profile picture of the author avajo71
        Originally Posted by ashloren View Post

        It is...? Seriously?

        Uh, I dunno, but...

        <html>
        <head><title>My Website</title></head>
        <body><h1>Welcome to My Website!</h1>
        <p>I wrote this all by myself. Look mom, no hands (or Wordpress!)</p></body>
        </html>

        That seems far simpler to me and I hand coded it myself.
        You seem are a web programmer.

        I am talking to the OP and everyone who have no knowledge at all in any web programming languages, including that <html> <head> <title> etc. Not to web programmers.
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        • Profile picture of the author Marian
          It's more about choosing the right WP theme and the right set of WP plugins for your projects. Listing the cons seems to be useless in this case, because the number of pros would be much much higher than the cons you may find...

          Definitely go for it! I mean for WordPress
          Marian
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        • Profile picture of the author StingGB
          The biggest Wordpress 'con' for me is the lack of help when things go wrong.

          It's a platform built and maintained by a community of volunteers. I've found the help forum can often be useless when there is a problem, populated mainly by developers more interested in displaying their ego's than solving your problem.

          I've never yet failed to eventually find a solution to any problem I've had with my WP site. But I wasted hundreds of hours, and more often than not its been by digging very deep into Google to find someone who has already been there.

          WP is good in a number of respects, but there is a lot to be said for paying for a product with a customer help line.
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  • Profile picture of the author Fernando Veloso
    Major con for those of us who own a big group of WP sites: updates.

    // This was a one liner in memory of extinct dofollow sig links. May it rest in peace. Or in pieces...
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  • Profile picture of the author Shannonn
    Banned
    Wordpress is a platform that does not require intensive courses. It is easy to work with and even those that are beginners in the domain can learn from it and with it. I agree that one of the problem that some people might have appears because of the many plug-ins that are installed recklessly.
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  • Profile picture of the author royalgalaxy
    if you add lots of plugins....
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  • Profile picture of the author vikash_kumar
    Cons of WordPress are Lesser When You Compare with the ease and long term value you create with wordpress.

    However, If you are new to wordpress....Following things should be taken care:
    1) You need to invest some time to learn some basic functions within Wordpress Dashboard.
    2) You need to understand which plugins are useful at the same time are reliable.
    3) You must update your plugins as well as themes within your wordpress periodically.
    4) You must have a good security plugin.

    In my opinion, If you have taken care some basic points as pointed above then you have a beautiful and stunning website with lots of functionality. A web property which is at par with the latest developments in the web world in the coming future years as well, All just clicking some buttons in your dashboard.

    My humble request to you that you should not see only the cons of Wordpress, You should give some time to learn this amazingly simple yet powerful piece of software on earth which is being used by massive number of websites without any issue from several years.

    Thanks,
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  • Profile picture of the author mrgoe
    Wordpress can do only up to a point a great website.. for different types of websites that can do different jobs, you`ll have to get specifil scripts or create your own html ones..
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe Lumbergh
    Im gonna go ahead and disagree here. I think its not a con of WP i think its very easy to crate a website in WP with no prior knowledge and its waay easier to make a site compared to coding one yourself in Dreamweaver for example. so thats definatly a plus

    cons: - slow
    - if youre not confident with the free templates you find, its gonna be a pain in the a** to change template styles
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  • Profile picture of the author igorGriffiths
    One of the cons with WordPress is the ease at which you can add plugins.

    A once stable and secure site can quickly turn into a flaky unstable wreck if your selection of plugins begins to conflict with the latest WP update, exactly the issue I am having since installing 3.6

    The issue of course is the interplay between WP core files, plugins and the database

    My top tip is to avoid using the onsite plugin search facility and seek out professional plugin developers who will maintain their software and update as required when each WP update is released.
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    • Profile picture of the author RobinInTexas
      Originally Posted by igorGriffiths View Post

      One of the cons with WordPress is the ease at which you can add plugins.

      A once stable and secure site can quickly turn into a flaky unstable wreck if your selection of plugins begins to conflict with the latest WP update, exactly the issue I am having since installing 3.6

      The issue of course is the interplay between WP core files, plugins and the database

      My top tip is to avoid using the onsite plugin search facility and seek out professional plugin developers who will maintain their software and update as required when each WP update is released.
      Poorly written plugins that conflict with others or break due to a change in the WordPress core are a large problem.


      There are many plugin authors who actively maintain and support their plugins. Most of the plugins I use are from the WordPress.org repository, and before adding one, I look at the tab labelled support and consider the issues others have had and whether the author resolves or responds to valid issues.
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      ...Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just set there.
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  • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
    I should make it a personal project to teach Alexa to use and enjoy WordPress
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  • Profile picture of the author samscott10
    The biggest con for wordpress is security. The sites can be hacked through sketchy plugins, themes, widgets etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author WayneT
    The "Cons" are all of the above and none of them.
    I look at it simply in what I think of as the "Microsoft" approach, you don't have to put something out there absolutely perfect, you can work on it and build it as both your clients, audience (use whatever word you need) and you grow.
    You have not given us much to go on....what sort of site are you wanting to use it for.As forthethere's too much out there you have to make up your mind one day....you won't always get it right......But don't let that scare you.
    Wordpress is a good platform for (in my personal experience)allwebsites, from "landing pages" through to full blown CMS sites.
    As far as the"haking" goes it happens to us all. Get a good host who backs up daily, You do your backups and above all ALWAYS keep wordpress and any plugins up to date even if you have them turned off at the time.....Then go for your life
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  • Profile picture of the author elijahdean24
    You better have time to waste figuring things out or pay someone who knows
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  • Profile picture of the author Dhira
    The only con (security) has been mentioned.
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  • Profile picture of the author vaninder
    security is not much of a problem
    i find wordpress the best blogging platform
    especially beacause it is newbie friendly
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  • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
    I am sorry, I can only say positives about WP and I think most of the counter-arguments are simply not true.

    If you think WP is "difficult", you are invited to try out Drupal or similar, much luck with that

    The most "difficult" part is still on the hosting side of things, that is having to learn basic things required like FTP upload, setting up a domain etc. as opposed to a self-hosted platform where this does not apply. But once this is learned (which is not hard), installing WP is literally done with a couple clicks.

    Once the basic site is up, you don't even need to know HTML, it's really only "play around and click" and is NOT more difficult as setting up, say, a site on blogspot or making a squidoo lens. (IN MY OPINION).

    * Most of the security issues are not really related to WP itself, those are hosting issues. Hackers wont hack a site because it's "wordpress" but because the hoster has security holes and is not "hardened", has no firewall running, out-dated PHP versions etc.

    So..the "problem" really is not WP but the necessity to know that the website host you use for the sites is secure. HOWEVER, this can be a non-issue if you use a good hosting company (probably even "managed" if you don't have experience). Oh..and by the way, if you use Cpanel you don't even need to bother with FTP uploads etc. but can install WO with one click right from Cpanel.

    Tip: If you use a $5/month host...you can in all likelihood also not expect top-notch support or necessarily that their host is always up-to-date in terms of security.

    * Spammy plugins with hidden code?

    What a generalization. I don't know where you got your plugins from. I never had this problem. If a plugin would cause problems or has "spam code" or holes in it or whatsoever, rest assured you would read about it on the plugin repository. At some point you will likely have a variety of favorite plugins to use (less is always better) and then you will also know how they behave. (Really, those are normally a few essential plugins such as SEO plugins, social plugins etc..no one forces anyone to use untried "odd" plugins).
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  • Profile picture of the author vaninder
    Security is not much of a problem
    I think that wordpress is the best blogging platform
    especially because it is newbie friendly
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      as a former contributing member of WordPress as well as countless open source communities - I can safely say that I know my way around WordPress really well. - as well as many other open source applications. I test them for fun! I'm a geek like that. :p

      Security is an issue - definitely - and most WP users assume that you just use this security plugin or that one and you're golden. Not so - site security starts at the server-level.

      What you may not be aware of with WordPress is how much cpu resources those cool plugins are using even with a good caching plugin.

      In my opinion, WordPress is resource-heavy and unless you are not using standard shared hosting, you could actually discover that your WordPress site is offline often due to reaching 100% of your server's resources.

      In your cPanel - you can actually monitor your resource usage - it's quite telling.
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      • Profile picture of the author kayebee
        I would say security but I don't think any website is 100 percent safe from being hacked. Technology is evolving at great rate, which means that there are more ways a site can get hacked. I was hacked twice. One time it was from uploading a theme. The other time was a brute force attack that came out of nowhere. I know security plugins aren't 100 percent safe but in my experience, I haven't had any problems with the one that I have on my site. Just my two cents.
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        • Profile picture of the author kpmedia
          Originally Posted by kayebee View Post

          I would say security but I don't think any website is 100 percent safe from being hacked.
          Yeah, but most sites aren't even 50% safe. (Even that is probably giving too much credit!)

          Indeed, WP is a resource hog, especially when security holes exist that hackers hammer with worthless traffic, slowing down your site in the process.

          Again, you do NOT truly secure anything via plugins. A plugin is still part of WP. In fact, many plugins ADD to the problem! (See also; resource hog)

          I'll explain more when I get a chance. (Though it may not be in this exact thread.)
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        • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
          Originally Posted by kayebee View Post

          I would say security but I don't think any website is 100 percent safe from being hacked.
          The one time I got hacked (not on my main host, my secondary hoster which had far less security features ) they simply overwrote the index.php/index.html REGARDLES what was on there. Ironically, the host had mostly super-simple HTML sites. The idea that HTML only sites are prone to hacking is ridiculous. When your index.htmls or index.php are gone no-one cares about the type of site.
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      • Profile picture of the author Graham Maddison
        Originally Posted by Karen Blundell View Post

        as a former contributing member of WordPress as well as countless open source communities - I can safely say that I know my way around WordPress really well. - as well as many other open source applications. I test them for fun! I'm a geek like that. :p

        Security is an issue - definitely - and most WP users assume that you just use this security plugin or that one and you're golden. Not so - site security starts at the server-level.

        What you may not be aware of with WordPress is how much cpu resources those cool plugins are using even with a good caching plugin.

        In my opinion, WordPress is resource-heavy and unless you are not using standard shared hosting, you could actually discover that your WordPress site is offline often due to reaching 100% of your server's resources.

        In your cPanel - you can actually monitor your resource usage - it's quite telling.
        Easy solution for security issues and slow loading wordpress sites is to find a "Dedicated Wordpress Hosting Company" ..even managed hosting. It may be a bit expensive, bu at least you will sleep at night.
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      • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
        Originally Posted by Karen Blundell View Post


        In my opinion, WordPress is resource-heavy and unless you are not using standard shared hosting, you could actually discover that your WordPress site is offline often due to reaching 100% of your server's resources.

        In your cPanel - you can actually monitor your resource usage - it's quite telling.
        When your business depends on reliability and dependability of your sites you should not even use shared hosting. Before I had my VPS/Hybrid I ran into problems on shared, but this with MULTIPLE WPs sites which all used "elaborate" autoblog plugins and some really heavy traffic

        Ever since I moved to VPS/Hybrid I don't see any resource/CPU usage problems whatsoever, and this with multiple sites, plugins etc.

        Then again, when I did some work for clients who had a single WP site running on shared like Gator/Daddy etc. I never saw any problems, unless you really use some "odd" plugins and/or get really good traffic...but then it's also time to consider serious hosting and not some $5/month shared kindergarten hosting
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  • Profile picture of the author blackli0n
    I think it's funny that people can manage to find cons in Wordpress when they haven't compared it to the alternatives. I was a former drupal/Joomla user as well as many other scripts. I converted over to Wordpress because it was so popular, so effective, fast, well-supported, huge extension database, and lots of free support online.

    If you're going to be a newb and not be able to do anything by yourself....then yes, you will have to put up with the 3rd-party theme-designers plugins/extensions and incompatibility issues. But if you know how to code cleanly yourself, and figure things out on your own, Wordpress offers an incredible platform for ease-of-use and customization. There is nothing LIKE wordpress that is better than wordpress.

    Whatever "cons" you may find in Wordpress, I would still recommend for you to use it because it's the best available...ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE A NEWB and will be doing things on your own.
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
    WordPress is great, but...

    1) It can be slow loading. (For example, a client of mine has a simple WordPress site that takes roughly 50 seconds; my plain HTML site loads -- literally -- almost 10 times faster.)

    2) The plug-ins can conflict with each other.

    3) Hackers love WordPress (especially older versions with a default configuration and a too-simple password).

    4) Frankly, for very simple sites, it can be overkill. (WordPress CAN get complex. For a site with just a few pages, plain HTML may better choice.)

    5) They can be tricky to move from host to host. Plug-ins can help with this, but HTML sites can be moved just by dragging within an FTP program.

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author Zaek
    Ok, so nobody said Joomla as an alternative, so.. What are the alternatives? I honestly dont see writing pure html to be all that secure. I took a class, made a nice website with clean code a few years back and in all honesty there were ZERO security features.
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  • Profile picture of the author vishwa
    Security and Plugins are main concerns which would I think should be the main dis advantages of the wordpress. Wordpress sites are hacked easily. The most plugins are very resource consuming, which lead them to make your server overload.
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    • Profile picture of the author vaninder
      I still don't understand why people are so much worried about the safety of the wordpress blog.
      If you are running on default security or are dependent on free security plugins out there, you wordpress blog is definitely at risk and you need to cope up to that problem but it is not that big issue.
      If you pay some attention towards security, it ddefinitely is the best blogging platform.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by mmobytes View Post

      Ok, so nobody said Joomla as an alternative, so.. What are the alternatives? I honestly dont see writing pure html to be all that secure. I took a class, made a nice website with clean code a few years back and in all honesty there were ZERO security features.
      Truly clean html code has no security features because it needs none. HTML is used to display content - no script or database calls. There's nothing to hack.

      The only security hazard is, as one poster above mentioned, server level security issues. And many of those are self-inflicted (using easy passwords and never changing them, for example).

      Once you start introducing more capability, whether it's via plugins with WP or cgi/php scripts with your static html pages, you start introducing security concerns.

      For very simple sites - like the squeeze page>confirm page>thank you page model many here use - WP is like hunting hummingbirds with a howitzer. You can find thousands of free html templates, and customizing them is easier than tweaking a WP theme. Find one, load it into Word or Open Office, plug in your content, and save as filtered html. Upload that, and you're good to go.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nuno
    Wordpress is overkill if you just need to create simple websites. One day you may forget to update one of them (main installation or plugin) and then you are hacked.
    For very high-traffic ones I also prefer pure html and an nginx or litespeed server.
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    • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
      Originally Posted by Nuno View Post

      Wordpress is overkill if you just need to create simple websites. One day you may forget to update one of them (main installation or plugin) and then you are hacked.
      For very high-traffic ones I also prefer pure html and an nginx or litespeed server.
      And how do you 'create' a simple HTML site? I mean it doesn't write itself Reading your reply almost makes one assume that you think writing a HTML site from scratch is faster/easier than the two clicks it requires to install a wordpress site? Another way is just simply "clone" an existing, simple HTML site/template..but then you will also have to change it a little and modify it...then you will still end up with more work than just installing WP
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      • Profile picture of the author F5K
        Originally Posted by GeorgR. View Post

        And how do you 'create' a simple HTML site? I mean it doesn't write itself Reading your reply almost makes one assume that you think writing a HTML site from scratch is faster/easier than the two clicks it requires to install a wordpress site? Another way is just simply "clone" an existing, simple HTML site/template..but then you will also have to change it a little and modify it...then you will still end up with more work than just installing WP
        I don't think I mentioned anything about a simple HTML site, or for that matter simple. And a 2-click Wordpress site, hmm, ok. Anyways, if you must use "Easy" it's easier now than ever before, there are great templates and frameworks, even responsive ones that can be used and re-used with minor tweaks and changes for multiple sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author Moneymaker2012
    Every other option you have may have cons, I am using WP since years and I haven't seen any thing that bother me, I like WP it is reliable and fast, support is also good.
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  • The first few hundred sites my webguys made in dreamweaver when I told him to make one in wordpress he was pissed and refused to do it.

    I think the biggest con is the security I have had a few hacked over the years, but it's less then 1%. The biggest plus is I can go put some copy and test ideas without writing up a request to my webguy only when I need graphics and layout etc.. So I love it, and yes it can get slow and some updates are a mess but it's all a give and take the way I see it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      last night I finally took a 5 year old WordPress blog and used a plugin that converted my entire blog into HTML - I deleted my WordPress database - and now my entire website is back to good old HTML and I can finally breathe a bit because I won't have to monitor it every single day like I was doing to stop bots from attacking or from watching my servers resources get eaten up by the security plugins I was using. I will probably find another CMS to use - but I will certainly not advertise to anyone what I am using.

      WordPress is great - but it's not the be all and end all like some people seem to think. And those who are the most insistent that it is, have a vested interest in it like I used to. So I understand - many of you make your living selling WP products and services - but understand there is plenty of room for competition - and if WordPress is as good as you proclaim, then you have nothing to fear from those of us who have decided to drop WordPress for other solutions.

      Remember, the Internet is great because there are choices that suit everybody - and not everybody has to think or do the same things as everyone else.
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  • Profile picture of the author kash21
    I've noticed a few bugs here and there. Apart from that I don't have a problem with it.
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  • Profile picture of the author mannagr1
    I feel that some of the cons of the Wordpress platform are: controls that are complicated and not user friendly, having to know encoding and embedding and text vss HTML - and that it's not cutting-edge technology. I've recently opted for a platform that doesn't require all that coding, that doesn't require a computer - and can be operated (image, videos, text) straight from your mobile device!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jtraits
    it's more easy to be hacked than the others (of course, there are tons of plugins for that but i am talking about wp only from scratch with no plugins).. you need to know html/css in order to make it the way you want the site to be
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  • Profile picture of the author F5K
    I think the major con for most sites I see are speed. The load time and resources can be overkill if all you need is a quick sales page or squeeze page. Some of my best sites are Wordpress free and fast as all heck. I like being different too. Just knowing I'm not following the herd is sometimes cool and refreshing. Not to mention, Wordpress wouldn't even exist if we all did the same thing, we'd still be running PhpNuke or something.
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  • Profile picture of the author StevenWatanabe
    For me the biggest con is that not all themes operate the same. Usually premium themes have different structures on how to setup the homepage, logos, icons, etc. Some have all options located as a main sidebar menu option, others are hidden as a submenu item.

    Also on occasion there will be instances where there are incompatibilities with plugins and themes. Today for example I found that when I run the OP plugin on my website, the theme will not show the slider.

    Things like that can really suck time!
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  • Profile picture of the author antares
    There are just too many factors that go into the success of a WordPress site -- from having a correct WordPress installation to using reliable themes and plugins; from ensuring your information architecture promotes ease of navigation to aligning and editing content; from ensuring your search engine optimization and Google verification is done correctly, to performing proper backups and updates.
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  • Profile picture of the author Albert Akogo
    Personally i think wordpress is a wonderful blogging platform. Though it isn't really newbie friendly with countless amounts of plugins needed to get started and also the lots tweaks needed to get a good looking blog.
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  • Profile picture of the author rondo
    WP 3.7 provides automatic security updates!


    Andrew
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  • Profile picture of the author imranbutt
    wordpress is best software but dont use admin name in your username otherwise your website may hack. For heavy customization wordpress is not not good.
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  • Profile picture of the author vikash_kumar
    Every fruit in life comes only after cracking considerably tough things...WordPress is something like that....High recommendation is "Learn WordPress" You will get benefited in the longer-term...

    Best Regards,
    Vikash Kumar
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  • Profile picture of the author beasty513
    It can be easily hacked.

    Wordpress is not exactly the best when

    it comes to online security.
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    • Profile picture of the author vikash_kumar
      Originally Posted by beasty513 View Post

      It can be easily hacked.

      Wordpress is not exactly the best when

      it comes to online security.

      Many of us are not agree....Millions of websites are running on WordPress....If this plateform is not secure...They would have already migrated....that is not the case...This says all...

      With WordPress...There are some points which needs to be taken care ...which is the case with other platforms as well.....

      Regards,
      Vikash
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  • Profile picture of the author aidendaniel
    Pro: Open Source
    WordPress, and many of the themes and plugins for it, are freely available as Open Source code under the GPLv2 license. In short, this means you can freely modify and distribute the code without paying licensing fees (assuming you comply with other aspects of the license).

    This one item here is fundamental to WordPress, and has a lot to do with every other pro and con on this list.

    Pro: Huge Community
    Out of all the Content Management Systems and Blogging platforms out there, WordPress would have the biggest community. At the time of writing, there are over 24,000 plugins and 1,700 themes available for free download on WordPress.org. But this is just the tip of the ice burg.

    The massive community is even more useful if you are planning on doing custom development. There are 30,000 questions and 43,000 answers on WordPress Answers alone. You then have the extensive documentation on WordPress Codex, and thousands of other websites. If you have a question about WordPress, it's probably already been answered (this is one of those cases where this statement is actually true)

    Pro: Easy to Install
    WordPress is famous for it's easy installation process. This is one of those things they have got so incredibly right. No other self-hosted web app can compare.

    After the core installation, you can also install plugins right from within the web GUI without needing to download anything or change config files. It's too simple, that it makes installation and development of any other platform seem incredibly difficult.

    Pro: Lower Total Cost of Ownership
    Any tech literate person can work in WordPress. Even those non tech literate can still find their way around the main tasks. This reduces the need for formal training and external support. Even upgrades are simple.

    The ubiquity of WordPress also means there is a sizeable talent pool out there of experienced WordPress people. If you need someone to do development, maintenance, or support for you then you are in luck! You could hire someone to do all of this for you, from anywhere in the world (I'm one of those people).

    Pro: Stable Plugin API Architecture
    In the early days, the plugin API changed a little (as with anything rapidly growing). Now days it's settled down, and it's highly unlikely it will break with anything but the most major upgrade. This makes it easy to develop a plugin, by reducing the ongoing maintenance work needed to constantly update the API compatibility level.
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