by Adie
41 replies
If you are planning to promote Amazon products, review websites are becoming ineffective. I am a successful amazon affiliate but never tried again running an amazon site after I discovered something better. Review sites are everywhere and the internet is becoming saturated by these sites.

The better way is to make a blog about a particular niche, post naturally (first person view) and link all mentioned products to your amazon affiliate links. I also discovered that banners are less effective than inline text links. People are always curios about the links so the click through on links have a far higher percentage that banner CTR.

For example, I post about how my new GPS system helped me find an unfamiliar place. I'll just link that "GPS system" to Amazon's GPS page with GPS products without over exaggerating the article.

Try this instead of writing tons of review articles..
#amazon #simple #tip
  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    Great insight. Also, you can step it up a notch with SEO'd pictures for some yumy google image traffic.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adie
      Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

      Great insight. Also, you can step it up a notch with SEO'd pictures for some yumy googlebimage traffic.
      That's right. Interesting articles/posts in first person view especially if posted on your personal blog always catches people's attention. The latest post I made yesterday about my new vermicomposting project already sold 12 amazon books/ebooks about vermicomposting, 2 garden shredder, and 4 worm factory... You can have a lot of products in just one article...
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      • Profile picture of the author writeaway
        Originally Posted by Adie View Post

        That's right. Interesting articles/posts in first person view especially if posted on your personal blog always catches people's attention. The latest post I made yesterday about my new vermicomposting project already sold 12 amazon books/ebooks about vermicomposting, 2 garden shredder, and 4 worm factory... You can have a lot of products in just one article...
        Yes. Even huge companies are getting in on retail blogging. I did a huge product description project for a multi-million dollar pet retailer last year. I helped reorient their focus to catalog descriptions which can easily be incorporated to personal blogs. Personalized sales content is more engaging. This is why it generates more sales. If big e-tailers are getting in on this type of blogging, affiliates should get in on this as well.
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        • do you outsource the writing of your blogs?
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          • Profile picture of the author Adie
            Originally Posted by nate55@bellsouth.net View Post

            do you outsource the writing of your blogs?
            I want to because I have a group of writers but I write everything myself if the article is for my personal use... Most articles are based on my personal experience so there is no need to delegate the writing....
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        • Profile picture of the author hometutor
          Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

          Yes. Even huge companies are getting in on retail blogging.
          When you see a company spend one-million dollars on an ad campaign and they send you to Youtube or Facebook instead of their own website, it's time to sit up and pay attention.

          Rick
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

      Great insight. Also, you can step it up a notch with SEO'd pictures for some yumy google image traffic.
      Maybe I'm a little slow on this subject, but I don't get the connection between people looking for images and buyers of products (or even info seekers). All I see is someone clicking an image and landing on the page with that image.

      I can see it if you're running cpm ads, maybe, where you basically get paid every time the page loads. But if the clicker is only looking for pictures, do they really read the content and click through, or do they only spin the traffic meter? :confused:
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      • Profile picture of the author writeaway
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        Maybe I'm a little slow on this subject, but I don't get the connection between people looking for images and buyers of products (or even info seekers). All I see is someone clicking an image and landing on the page with that image.

        I can see it if you're running cpm ads, maybe, where you basically get paid every time the page loads. But if the clicker is only looking for pictures, do they really read the content and click through, or do they only spin the traffic meter? :confused:
        Some people look for pictures of products they are interested in. Some are looking merely for pictures. You can't really overlook those who are looking for pictures of products they are interested in.
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      • Profile picture of the author writeaway
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        Maybe I'm a little slow on this subject, but I don't get the connection between people looking for images and buyers of products (or even info seekers). All I see is someone clicking an image and landing on the page with that image.

        I can see it if you're running cpm ads, maybe, where you basically get paid every time the page loads. But if the clicker is only looking for pictures, do they really read the content and click through, or do they only spin the traffic meter? :confused:
        Also, another advantage to doing this is that the SEO'd photo tags of the products can help with on page SEO.
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  • Profile picture of the author seobro
    This is true, and I do agree. Yeah, we are getting less money - not more. It just to be so easy. Well, a bunch of people did jump in. Getting crowded as we say. Lots of sites are trying to sell you. Can't even use the word review. Oh yes, they never even bought the item, but cut and paste the specs. Also, what is the deal with all the cookie cutter sites created using word press. Most look very scammy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stuart Walker
    There are other sites aside from review and niche blogs that can work REALLY with Amazon.

    I'm not going to spell it all out but think of a way to create a site that is sociable, interactive, gets people linking, clicking, revisiting, sharing, pinning etc and you can make some decent money from Amazon and indeed other online retailers as it's always good to add more value by not just linking to Amazon and there's no shortage of other online retailers that convert.

    It has to be a little bit outside the box but there are plenty ways if you put your thinking cap on.
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  • Profile picture of the author webmonopoly
    You can always add a blog as a category to your review sites and get the best of both worlds.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adie
      Originally Posted by webmonopoly View Post

      You can always add a blog as a category to your review sites and get the best of both worlds.
      I am not running any review site. My amazon sites are all blogs and have personalized content. As much as possible, I don't want to write any review unless based on personal experience.
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      • Profile picture of the author CatherineMay
        Originally Posted by Adie View Post

        I am not running any review site. My amazon sites are all blogs and have personalized content. As much as possible, I don't want to write any review unless based on personal experience.

        By personal experience, do you mean you actually buy each product you write about?
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        • Profile picture of the author Adie
          Originally Posted by CatherineMay View Post

          By personal experience, do you mean you actually buy each product you write about?
          Nope... It's like writing a fiction. For example I want to promote a fitness equipment. I am going to write a short story with me as protagonist on about how I transformed into something after xx days or what xx I did through that machine.. something like that. Not just copying and pasting the product features and descriptions found in amazon... There's a lot of stories to write...
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by Adie View Post

            Nope... It's like writing a fiction. For example I want to promote a fitness equipment. I am going to write a short story with me as protagonist on about how I transformed into something after xx days or what xx I did through that machine.. something like that. Not just copying and pasting the product features and descriptions found in amazon... There's a lot of stories to write...
            Then I assume you are going to identify these 'fictions' as such, or are you just planning to lie to people through your teeth to make a buck?:confused:

            Edit: While we're at it, how many of the stories you've "shared" here about your success are the same kind of first-person fictions?

            I'm guessing you must be outside the US, because if this is true, in another thread you just admitted to almost 2,000 acts of fraud...
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            • Profile picture of the author dad2four
              Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

              Then I assume you are going to identify these 'fictions' as such, or are you just planning to lie to people through your teeth to make a buck?:confused:

              Edit: While we're at it, how many of the stories you've "shared" here about your success are the same kind of first-person fictions?

              I'm guessing you must be outside the US, because if this is true, in another thread you just admitted to almost 2,000 acts of fraud...
              John, I'm curious about something.

              And realize, I'm not comfortable writing articles and claiming that I have personal experience with them when I don't.

              But I'm curious, why is it ok for bigshots to do this but not us little peeps?

              There are plenty of examples of this on television. You know darn good and well that many if not most of the people that endorse products on television couldn't care less about it not to mention used it.

              Here is a link showing plenty of foder.

              https://www.google.com/search?q=cele...w=1680&bih=920
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              • Profile picture of the author myob
                Originally Posted by dad2four View Post

                I'm not comfortable writing articles and claiming that I have personal experience with them when I don't.

                But I'm curious, why is it ok for bigshots to do this but not us little peeps?

                There are plenty of examples of this on television. You know darn good and well that many if not most of the people that endorse products on television couldn't care less about it not to mention used it.
                You may not notice, but when a celebrity "endorses" a product on television, there is a disclaimer briefly flashed in fine print to the effect that this is a paid endorsement or the actor is compensated. This makes it "legal".

                Us little peeps (especially in the US) can get into big trouble by using Adie's "simple tip" without a similar disclaimer:
                Originally Posted by Adie View Post

                ... It's like writing a fiction. For example I want to promote a fitness equipment. I am going to write a short story with me as protagonist on about how I transformed into something after xx days or what xx I did through that machine.. something like that. Not just copying and pasting the product features and descriptions found in amazon... There's a lot of stories to write...
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                • Profile picture of the author Adie
                  Originally Posted by myob View Post


                  Us little peeps (especially in the US) can get into big trouble by using Adie's "simple tip" without a similar disclaimer:
                  If you think it's not for you then don't do it. As for me, I find nothing wrong as people are buying physical products with already great reviews from real customers. I'm not selling any moneymaking course from my dreams...
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                  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                    Originally Posted by Adie View Post

                    If you think it's not for you then don't do it. As for me, I find nothing wrong as people are buying physical products with already great reviews from real customers. I'm not selling any moneymaking course from my dreams...
                    Since you have a list of things it's okay to lie about and things that it isn't, I think that I just got a new name for my "never buy from" list...
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                  • Profile picture of the author myob
                    Originally Posted by Adie View Post

                    If you think it's not for you then don't do it. As for me, I find nothing wrong as people are buying physical products with already great reviews from real customers. I'm not selling any moneymaking course from my dreams...
                    Deceptive marketing practices such as what you are advising is against the FTC Advertising Act, which specifically addresses bloggers. You can rationalize all you want, but it is also illegal in several other jurisdictions besides just the US.

                    And since Amazon has a lot of liability exposure from the misbehavior of affiliates, they are vigilant and intolerant regarding such illegal activities. It is quite common for Amazon to shutdown affiliate accounts that are in violation of their TOS without notice or recourse.
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          • Profile picture of the author Chris Silvey
            Originally Posted by Adie View Post

            Nope... It's like writing a fiction. For example I want to promote a fitness equipment. I am going to write a short story with me as protagonist on about how I transformed into something after xx days or what xx I did through that machine.. something like that. Not just copying and pasting the product features and descriptions found in amazon... There's a lot of stories to write...
            Don't you think your conversions will drop? If I read several posts on a blog about a persons personal experience with X number of products with amazon links, it would be quick for me to understand it is all BS.
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            • Profile picture of the author Adie
              Originally Posted by Chris Silvey View Post

              Don't you think your conversions will drop? If I read several posts on a blog about a persons personal experience with X number of products with amazon links, it would be quick for me to understand it is all BS.
              I am limiting upto 3 links per post and mostly seen near the end of the article. Me too don't like reading articles with a lot of highlighted links... especially those adbrite links.
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            • Profile picture of the author thedog
              This method's been around for a while and can be quite effective. I wouldn't rule out review sites just yet, yes there's a lot more than a few years back, I just think it's all about offering a better site than the competition.
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  • Profile picture of the author Adie
    I'm guessing you must be outside the US, because if this is true, in another thread you just admitted to almost 2,000 acts of fraud...
    I am outside of US but been there just 3 months ago. Those 2,000 posts are products that I have and some are not even found in US but found in UK. And those are physical products so I don't know about that fraud you are talking about. . All sellers are liars. They only differ on the degree of lying. If I said "I was able to boil eggs under the sun using this solar oven" but I didn't tried, its not fraud, because everyone knows that everyone can do that and that's the reason why a solar oven is made...It's lying but its not fraud. But if I said I make tons of money by doing xxx after 3 days selling that method for xxx but in reality I didn't, now that is fraud....

    Internet marketers selling moneymaking products are terrible liars than internet marketers selling physical products.....

    Being creative to sell physical products that already have dozens of positive reviews is not fraud... It's called hype and there's nothing wrong in doing a clever marketing strategy...
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    • Profile picture of the author davezan
      Originally Posted by Adie View Post

      All sellers are liars. They only differ on the degree of lying. If I said "I was able to boil eggs under the sun using this solar oven" but I didn't tried, its not fraud, because everyone knows that everyone can do that and that's the reason why a solar oven is created...It's lying but its not fraud. But if I said I make tons of money by doing xxx after 3 days selling that method for xxx but in reality I didn't, now that is fraud....

      Internet marketers selling moneymaking products are terrible liars than internet marketers selling physical products.....

      Being creative to sell physical products that already have dozens of positive reviews is not fraud... It's called hype and there's nothing wrong in doing a clever marketing strategy...
      Fraud - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

      1
      a : deceit, trickery; specifically : intentional perversion of truth in order to induce another to part with something of value or to surrender a legal right
      Lie - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

      1: to make an untrue statement with intent to deceive
      While you're also entitled to your opinion, that pretty much (unfairly) brushed
      a broad stroke on all sellers here who especially don't need to lie. Unless you
      also have virtually irrefutable proof to back up what you said, it's not a good
      idea to generalize, either.

      (Sorry for the off-topic post, folks. Back to your intended discussion.)
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Stewart
      Originally Posted by Adie View Post

      All sellers are liars. They only differ on the degree of lying.
      This statement is absolutely untrue!

      I've been selling for years and although there was a time in years past when I've been less than perfect, over time I've learned to do clean business. Build trust with your customers and they'll continue to buy from you for years. Be honest, take good care of them and they'll take good care of you. You'll develop a stellar reputation and your business will be built on solid ground.

      Lying to people will nearly always come back to bite you and admitting that you do it in front of your peers doesn't do much for your reputation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Geri Richmond
    Hi,
    Thanks a lot for the tip. That is actually what I have been doing. I don't have any review sites for the affiliate products on Amazon. I just put links in my blog posts.
    Geri Richmond
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Adie View Post

      ... It's like writing a fiction. For example I want to promote a fitness equipment. I am going to write a short story with me as protagonist on about how I transformed into something after xx days or what xx I did through that machine.. something like that. Not just copying and pasting the product features and descriptions found in amazon... There's a lot of stories to write...
      Be very careful when using this "simple tip". I know of several Amazon affiliates who have lost their accounts by "pretending" to have used Amazon products in order to make a sale. It is considered a violation of FTC advertising law in the US and consequently against Amazon's TOS.

      Perhaps a better method may be to provide case studies of individuals or businesses using products for specific applications (preferably w/video demos) and strongly recommending these products to targeted prospects within similar niches. This method has worked extremely well for me for over 16 years.
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      • Profile picture of the author Adie
        Originally Posted by myob View Post

        Be very careful when using this "simple tip". I know of several Amazon affiliates who have lost their accounts by "pretending" to have used Amazon products in order to make a sale. It is considered a violation of FTC advertising law in the US and consequently against Amazon's TOS.

        Perhaps a better method may be to provide case studies of individuals or businesses using products for specific applications (preferably w/video demos) and strongly recommending these products to targeted prospects within similar niches. This method has worked extremely well for me for over 16 years.
        Almost half of my articles are how to's and yes, it required extensive research. thanks though.
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  • Profile picture of the author Relic32
    i heard Amazon products aren't that good to promote as they have very low commissions, is this true?
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by Relic32 View Post

      i heard Amazon products aren't that good to promote as they have very low commissions, is this true?
      Amazon has volume-based commission tiers of up to 8.5% on general products. By planning your marketing with a mix of low end products (for quantity purchases) and high end products (for maxing out with the highest commission rate), you can earn a very comfortable income. There are Amazon affiliates earning 6 figures a month or more.
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  • Profile picture of the author onlineworkers
    Thanks mate... I was about to start with amazon affiliates and this one really helped me. I started to thing of my own example where we try to avoid clicking a banner. So will keep this things and start. Also any tips or coaching for a fresh amazon affiliates would be highly appreciated..

    Regards
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  • Profile picture of the author yunoblog
    I've started to notice this as well. Rather than doing a review website, I decided to do an informational website and put my product link whenever it was appropriate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lokahi
    And, do you publish video reviews on your blog, or only text? Do you find that text reviews are better for SEO?
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    • Profile picture of the author Adie
      Originally Posted by Lokahi View Post

      And, do you publish video reviews on your blog, or only text? Do you find that text reviews are better for SEO?
      I don't like video reviews for some reason. I myself don't trust video reviews.
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      • Profile picture of the author Lokahi
        Originally Posted by Adie View Post

        I don't like video reviews for some reason. I myself don't trust video reviews.
        True, it's not as good as text reviews for SEO. I was just wondering if maybe video reviews would help set the site/blog apart from others using the same concept?
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        • Profile picture of the author thedog
          Originally Posted by Lokahi View Post

          True, it's not as good as text reviews for SEO. I was just wondering if maybe video reviews would help set the site/blog apart from others using the same concept?
          Not exactly true if you're using YouTube that is. I've been ranking YouTube videos on the the first page of google for long tail keywords. Someone is much more likely to click on a YouTube thumbnail in the search results than a plain old text link, people just click video. I'd rather have a YouTube video sitting mid page than a text link on the top spot.

          What type of videos you're uploading is up to you, there's lots of garbage videos on YouTube, you know the type, a couple of bad images and some text... don't expect much results from this type.

          If you upload quality review videos, that help the viewer make a better and more informed decision, then video marketing can be very effective.

          Offer value.

          And if you don't think video marketing is effective or important...
          • Two-thirds of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2016.
            Source: Cisco
          • Video equals higher viewer retention, the information retained in one minute of online video is equal to about 1.8 million written words.
            Source: Brainshark
          • About 46% of people say they’d be more likely to seek out information about a product or service after seeing it in an online video.
            Source:Eloqua
          • Having video on the landing page of your site makes it 53% more likely to show up on page 1 of Google.
            Source: Mist Media
          • By providing content regularly and using videos, your email opt-outs can be reduced by as much as 75%.
            Source: Eloqua
          • The average user spends 88% more time on a website with video.
            Source: Mist Media
          • Blog posts incorporating video attract 3 times as many inbound links as blog posts without video.
            Source: SEOmoz
          • More than 800 million unique users visit YouTube each month.
            Source: YouTube

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  • You can have a blog about the general subject without lying about it. You can talk about other people within the industry, give all types of how-to information, and so on. Then just link to related products whenever you can.

    But that being said, you generally won't see anywhere near the amount of sales doing it like this as you would with a review site. The reason is because people aren't in "buying mode" when they're on your blog. It's a lot harder to convince someone they need an associated product when they're not actively looking to buy it.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarginMetrics
    I've purchased from reviews like that in the past. Especially if the articles are well written and genuinely seem to be a true products review from personal experience.

    If they weren't.... Well I guess that is a job well done, by a creative writer. :p
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  • Profile picture of the author zahanega
    Great advice Definitely very useful thank you
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