Discourage or encourage brother (13y) from venturing into IM?

30 replies
My brother took interest in what I do, and we spend a whole day talking about how he could also earn money online. He's 13 years old.
Now I was thinking about encouraging him to set up a Zazzle store or Youtube adsense. Y'know, having fun with drawing and making movies, and as a bonus some potential earnings. But he has zero online presence nor any experience, so I doubt he'd earn more than a few pennies a month.

Before I ramble too much: what if it results in a disappointment? Better wait a few years?
#13y #brother #discourage #encourage #teenager #venturing
  • I'd say he's probably too young to really learn the ins and outs of it for now. Maybe in a few years. Right now if he made any money, I agree it would be a tiny amount.
    Signature
    Need Music For Your Videos, Podcasts, Sites, etc? Get It Now On My YouTube Channel!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8385814].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jarrett
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Long Beach Nathan View Post

      I'd say he's probably too young to really learn the ins and outs of it for now. Maybe in a few years. Right now if he made any money, I agree it would be a tiny amount.

      disagree. If he's seriously interested and motivated.. take the time to show him.. there's absolutely no reason why he can't crush it at 13.

      I was 13 when I started my first computer company... And it made over 6 figures. and now there's way more opportunity online than ever.. so no reason why he can't do it too!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8385929].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Diesell
        Hey Jarret you are so right bro! Now i'm NOT an empower fan, but did you that YT vid from that 12 old year boy...thaught he was making over 6K a month, that is NO typo... LOL!

        It doesn't matter how old you are, it's how motivated you are, and how much you want it!

        Maybe he has potential, let him ;-)
        Signature
        Do You Need *TRAFFIC* And Want To Get *PAID* To Use This Secret Buyers Source?
        It Takes Only 5 Min. A/D !

        Go Here =>
        Secret Traffic Source
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8394046].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author altitudemarketer
          Inspire him to express his dreams.

          Have him focus on his passions. Whether it's buying and selling (he could do ebay), serving, teaching, playing music, repairing, building, writing, creating content, videos, drawings, whatever he enjoys learning and excelling at... Teach him the value of excellence and show him some examples that he can look up to and be inspired by.

          This will set him up for a life of success. But as others have said, monitor and coach him to protect him... He's too young to have to make all the decisions he has to in order to filter the good and the bad.

          If most kids could develop their passions and dreams at that age into products and skills that can be used on the internet, we will have a much brighter future than what the government controlled institutions are churning out.

          In 2-5 years, he can covert the work of his passions into a great future for himself and others. Help him see that providing value and working hard will lead to being compensated well... Not to focus on a quick buck... He's lucky to have someone like you thinking about these things and willing to help him before the responsibilities of adulthood hit him.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8394087].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Geri Richmond
      Hi,
      Make sure his school work comes first. If he is really interested and motivated then show him the ropes. Tell him that an online presence is necessary. He's not going to get rich overnight, so make sure he understands that. Good Luck!!

      Geri Richmond
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391215].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
      Originally Posted by Long Beach Nathan View Post

      I'd say he's probably too young to really learn the ins and outs of it for now. Maybe in a few years. Right now if he made any money, I agree it would be a tiny amount.
      I would also disagree with this! I read an article on how a 15 year old girls sold 60,000 pairs of flip-flops -- generating her around 1.2 million dollars in a year!

      How a 15-year-old entrepreneur got her product into Nordstrom | Profit Minded - Yahoo! Small Business Advisor

      This goes to show you no matter what age, background, or experience you have -- all skills are learn able and it is up the person if they succeed or not.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8393637].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author GetBack2it
    I say have him start, but start slow and have him involved in something he likes/enjoys. Pick a niche that would suit him. Not to much at one time or he'll get burnt out.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8385934].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author USA
    Depending on the boy's maturity level, and with adult guidance, maybe...

    Much of what people do in the IM world is unethical. Especially in the "make money online", and "IM" categories in general.

    Blackhat methods and techniques are more the norm than not.

    If you are willing to tutor him and mentor him in ethical business practices, putting morals above money, then my answer is yes.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8385955].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jcadrin
    Why would you discourage this is the question. Full speed ahead, nurture his entrepreneurial spirit
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8386095].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by LeonLion View Post

    Better wait a few years?
    I would, yes.

    My parents certainly wouldn't have wanted me to start internet marketing at the age of 13 - rightly, I think.

    If I had a 13-year-old child, I'd certainly be discouraging it, too.

    One inevitably wonders about "how kids like that are going to grow up" and the social/relationship difficulties they might face in future. Educational psychologists certainly seem pretty opposed to the principle, and they're the ones with the information/evidence.

    I'd certainly err on the safe side and wait a while, myself, on balance.

    (And that's without even mentioning the potential for legal/contractual difficulties involved: even this forum doesn't knowingly permit people under the age of 18 to be members, because of the potential for legal complications arising from it).

    Just my perspective.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8386119].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author USA
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      I would, yes.

      My parents certainly wouldn't have wanted me to start internet marketing at the age of 13 - rightly, I think.

      If I had a 13-year-old child, I'd certainly be discouraging it, too.

      One inevitably wonders about "how kids like that are going to grow up" and the social/relationship difficulties they might face in future. Educational psychologists certainly seem pretty opposed to the principle, and they're the ones with the information/evidence.

      I'd certainly err on the safe side and wait a while, myself, on balance.

      (And that's without even mentioning the potential for legal/contractual difficulties involved: even this forum doesn't knowingly permit people under the age of 18 to be members, because of the potential for legal complications arising from it).

      Just my perspective.
      I agree with you in principle but I really think it depends on the "child" (yes, this is a child and should be handled/treated accordingly), and on the abilities and resources/circumstances of the parent(s).

      Having home-schooled both of my sons, I often encouraged entrepreneurial pursuits if and when they showed interest or when certain opportunities arose. However, I was not in this business when they were growing up (they are now 19 and 26).

      If done correctly, certain aspects of Internet Marketing may be used as teaching tools to instruct in the fundamentals of business administration as well as confidence builders, especially when the child earns his or her first meager wages, totally through his own efforts and ingenuity (under mom or dad's tutelage and mentorship of course).

      In my opinion, there are way too many variables concerning the particular circumstances or situation of the child in question for this question to be definitively answered in this type of medium, without much more pertinent information relative to the child and his family situation, and endless, exhaustive debate.

      I would proceed cautiously LeonLion. Take into account your own circumstances and the intelligence and maturity of the child. Would such a pursuit truly benefit his mental and spiritual development at this time in his life? Do you have the time and resources to dedicate to him? Only you can make the final decision.

      My sons started out mowing lawns, delivering newspapers, and shoveling snow to earn their first money (my wife and I believe an unearned allowance encourages an entitlement mentality). They both opened their first savings account about the age of ten or so. Money earned by the sweat of your own brow is usually appreciated much more, and managed much better.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8390482].message }}
  • I'd 'hire' him to help you. This way he can learn the ins and outs of how it works, without having to be 100% dedicated to it. It also puts you more in control.

    Tell him you are hiring him for 2 hours per week or whatever, that way he will have plenty of time for school and friends, which are MUCH more important at this age.

    Also you can ensure he is only going to be doing the tasks you feel are good for him.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8386124].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ReferralCandy
      He's 13 years old, which some might say is kind of young for exploring the world of business and IM, where he is bound to face harsh comments, and witness some degree of ugliness in some people.

      But if that is his passion, who are we to deny that? Where exactly should be draw the line and maintain the balance of letting him do what he wants, and also look out for his wellbeing?

      Originally Posted by Michael Levanduski View Post

      I'd 'hire' him to help you. This way he can learn the ins and outs of how it works, without having to be 100% dedicated to it. It also puts you more in control.

      Tell him you are hiring him for 2 hours per week or whatever, that way he will have plenty of time for school and friends, which are MUCH more important at this age.

      Also you can ensure he is only going to be doing the tasks you feel are good for him.
      I agree with this approach, as you can allow him to then explore his interests, and you can also be there to look out for him. Even when he make mistakes, you can take the opportunity to teach him as well.

      In the event that his interest is short-lived, at least he will have had a chance to try things out for himself.

      Cheers,
      Hum
      Signature

      Measure, manage and incentivize customer referrals with ReferralCandy.

      PS: Looking to get more repeat customers for a physical store? Check out CandyBar's digital loyalty cards!

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391226].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I have a similar situation with my 14-year old
    son who makes Flash videos and design video
    games using a program called GameMaker and
    has been begging me to get a Youtube channel
    to show off his work. But I'm just afraid of how
    those nasty comments on YT would affect him.
    I'm not so sure I want to expose him to that
    atmosphere so early.

    I did give him a URL though where he can practice
    his HTML skills. It's a delicate balance.

    -Ray Edwards
    Signature
    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8386164].message }}
  • I would encourage it. I have a 6 year old daughter who already knows that she can record a song with me in my studio, upload it to the internet, make it available for sale on iTunes, and receive money from people buying it. She also knows that I earn money from having my own business which operates on the internet as opposed to having a job to go to as so many other parents do. She understands that when I buy her anything, it comes from that income. By the time she is a teenager she will most likely have a very Entrepreneurial mindset, and this will not be a bad thing. If she was 13 today and actually had a great idea for a business online, I would definitely not be discouraging her and make her wait. Wait for what? That to me would be ridiculous. People just need to get with the times. As if it was anything offline, I.E. Baby sitting or a lemonade stand, etc, it would be more acceptable. Just my opinion.
    Signature
    Arnold Stolting - Stolting Media Group
    "I LOVE The Song! The Vibe Is Positive And Firm!" - Kymani Marley. (Son of Bob Marley)
    "Keep Up The Good Work!" Tony Lindsay - Lead Vocalist, Carlos Santana.

    "Very High Quality!" Jeremy Harding - Manager / Producer. Sean Paul.
    "They Are FANTASTIC!" - Willie Crawford.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8386178].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jared Hale
    I would say set him up with his own WordPress type website where he can learn how websites work. Something personal to him where he can upload pictures and share posts of importance to him. We all started small somewhere and chances are it was with a simple websites. From there he can get into YouTube videos and as he grows so can his knowledge of marketing and search engine fundamentals and finally into making some money. Newbies that just start out with affiliate marketing usually get discouraged when they are adults, yet alone kids.

    Making real money online takes time and patience. Who knows he may be the next Jeremy Schoemaker, but for now baby steps and introduce him to a paper route, dog walking or babysitting to get him little entrepreneurial feet wet.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8390511].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author affiliateg
    Definitely encourage him! It's a great age, when people can learn this stuff pretty easy. It's better than spending all his time on facebook anyway.
    Signature

    Your online health resource: DailyHealthMagazine.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8390570].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      If his interest was about how to start or run an online business and the technical aspects, methods, etc - I'd say help him start learning.

      It sounds as if what interests him about IM is "the money" - and I wouldn't start him on that path at 13.

      Young marketers focused only on making money tend to act with the natural impulsiveness of youth and "fudging" his age for Paypal or affiliate networks can result in a lifetime ban. That can limit his options to work online when he is of legal age.

      If you encourage him now - you need to keep looking over his shoulder for his own good.
      Signature
      Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world will change forever for that one dog.

      You should always be yourself...unless you can be a Unicorn. Then you should always be a Unicorn.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391126].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
    I think the focus shouldn't be so much on earning money but
    in learning fundamental marketing principles and just having
    fun building skills.

    If he's developing skills and learning marketing fundamentals
    those are skills and knowledge that will serve him well through
    his entire adult life.

    Kindest regards,
    Andrew Cavanagh
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391148].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Warranty
    let him try, but don't let him post WSO's

    PPD,CPA+Youtube, etc is good way to go.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391233].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by LeonLion View Post

    My brother took interest in what I do, and we spend a whole day talking about how he could also earn money online. He's 13 years old.
    Now I was thinking about encouraging him to set up a Zazzle store or Youtube adsense. Y'know, having fun with drawing and making movies, and as a bonus some potential earnings. But he has zero online presence nor any experience, so I doubt he'd earn more than a few pennies a month.

    Before I ramble too much: what if it results in a disappointment? Better wait a few years?
    I'm a firm believer that kids are never too young to teach them the entrepreneurial mindset and spirit. My father instilled that in me as soon as I could walk. It's all in the approach and calibration.

    However, instead of encouraging him to set up a Zazzle store, I would first with teaching him how to think like an entrepreneur. Teach him the fundamentals of small business in a way that's interesting and exciting, and see if it's something he would be interested in. I like Michael's idea on hiring him and this way you can teach him the basics.

    And if you two take on a venture together and the results are disappointing, so what? That's part of life, that's part of business. The reason why I'm successful today is because I failed probably 50x more than any of my friends or peers. But I kept at it.

    I don't think any age is too young. I'm nephew is 6 years old and I'm gradually teaching him the concept of money, what stocks are, what real estate is, and why he should never, ever have to work for anyone else. Sure, we spend time playing together, watching Thomas the Train, Dora the Explorer, etc. so he still gets to be a kid.

    Don't underestimate kids and teenagers, if you expose them to the entrepreneurial spirit, some of them will really latch onto it. It all comes down to calibration. Trust me, they deal with harsh stuff at school all the time, most of which they won't tell you about.

    RoD
    Signature
    "Your personal philosophy is the greatest determining factor in how your life works out."
    - Jim Rohn
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391248].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Lloyd Buchinski
      You never know. The 13 year old might be better at it than the rest of us. Here is a link I posted in this forum a few years ago. Just checked and glad to see that the story is still up.

      8 year old worth 900,000 net from businesses he started

      And do you think I can borrow $10 from my kid? No!

      The story got a whole range of reactions, from congratulations to disbelief, to (in another forum) 'I'd like to punch the little ***** in the face.'

      I guess if you're filled with hate, there's nothing like a kid being smarter than you to set it off.
      Signature

      Do something spectacular; be fulfilled. Then you can be your own hero. Prem Rawat

      The KimW WSO

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391482].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author LeonLion
    Thanks for the many replies! The majority is positive.
    I agree that fun and a correct mindset come before thinking about money.

    Apparently, he went out yesterday to take pictures in the park so he can sell those online. Plus side: enthusiasm, minus side: it does seem he dreams of easy money!

    I'll monitor for a few weeks, and try to make sure he's having fun and doesn't expect easy pocket money. Then, based on his attitude, we can decide whether or not to continue.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391463].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jacqueline Smith
    Nurture that entrepreneurial spirit!

    My grandson is 11 and I am in the process of helping him build his first website.

    Rod's advice is perfect......try not to focus too much on the financial aspect.....help him learn the basics of business....the good and the bad....and let him develop his skills.

    He's lucky to have a brother who cares so much.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391467].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    You can't start too early. As long as you teach him that REAL BUSINESS is all about HONESTY, integrity, SERVICE, and VALUE, he should be good to go.
    Signature

    Want To Make More Money Online? Invest in BETTER CONTENT!
    Articles - Blogs - Authority sites - Ecommerce descriptions - Emails - Youtube video scripts - AFFORDABLE RATES!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391558].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author astronomynerd
      I first started learning programming when I was 9 (first in Visual Basic, then a year later moved on to C/C#) and got into Internet Marketing when I was 12. I did't really make much money in IM until I was 15, however At 14, using my programming skills I made £1000 for designing a website.

      It's never too early, however I was quite frustrated not earning that much when I was much younger. I would warn him that there will be a few up-sets but the end-result (if he doesn't quit too early) will be quite rewarding.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391587].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author alrikvincent
    It would be really great if he learn't design and things like that. But the only worry that I will have is that he spends more time on making money and less time on his education which is the most important thing at this age. Encourage him to study and go to college. Making money can wait. If you are going to encourage him to learn design then you shouldn't think twice. Same applies for programming and building his own website
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8391597].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rsherwood
    Dont ever knock any body down for showing interest !

    I started my IM venture at 16 but quit soon after due to negative influences!

    Now Im back at it stronger than ever!

    Its never to young to start something new, take him by the hand and show him what needs to be done.

    Done correctly and Im sure he will be breaking 7 figures a year by the time he is 20!

    All the best,

    R.S
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8393650].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author YoungAce
    I've been "internet marketing" in some form or another since I was about 13. I learned a lot of good stuff (specifically, what does NOT work well). I'd suggest signing him up for one of the paid offer websites -- if he works hard, he can get checks in the mail. Specifically, encourage him to get referrals. That's a skill that will take him a long way in affiliate marketing!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8393654].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[8394135].message }}

Trending Topics