43 replies
Hi Warriors.

Most of you definitely are making money online now. I've heard a lot of success stories in WF, but rarely seen any successful internet marketers talking about their failures. Well if you don't mind, mind sharing to me some of the failures you faced and how you overcome it to be where you are right now?

Thanks!
Buck
#fallen #warriors
  • Profile picture of the author sidneyng
    I for one have failed forward in so many "projects".
    I tried (spent $$) and failed in affiliate sites, lousy solo ads, and building a list using classifield sites.

    Have I given up?
    Honestly a few times!
    But after dusting my back - I get back on the saddle again to try new things and to brave on.

    There's always new things to learn for each failure - either the offer's appeal, your approach or effectiveness (i.e. time spent vs return).
    I always recommend beginners to draw first blood by providing a service rather than to go crazy and spend on fancy strategies...
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  • Profile picture of the author PerformanceMan
    Most projects I attempt fail. It's the nature of the game
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    • Profile picture of the author celente
      Originally Posted by PerformanceMan View Post

      Most projects I attempt fail. It's the nature of the game
      imagine if THOMAS EDISON GAVE UP.

      Some other jerk would have invented the lightbulb. LOL.

      Thomas edison has been quoted as saying, "I did not find a way to build a working lightbulb, I found a thousand or so ways on how NOT to build a working lightbulb, and went from there! "

      ok, that might not be the exact quote, but my point is, he tested, and tested and got closer and closer until BINGO! success! This is a man I admire, and a true man that turned a dream into reality and EVEN changed mankind in the process.

      This is an example we can all learn from. NEVER EVER, EVER GIVE UP.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by bakkadda View Post

    I've heard a lot of success stories in WF, but rarely seen any successful internet marketers talking about their failures.
    I suspect that's partly because so many people here are promoting something, and they have more credibility talking about their successes than about their failures. That's understandable enough, really? (Of course there are also some who take it to self-promotional extremes and even start off threads to explain "why they're so successful", and so on.)

    I'n not promoting anything here, and have said quite a bit about my failures. Some of which were disastrous.

    When I first started, I did absolutely everything wrong that you can do wrong, and more that nobody else would even have found ways to do wrong.

    I started off trying to promote ClickBank products, without understanding that affiliate sales come from building relationships with potential subscribers.

    I thought it was a good idea to promote products with high gravities because I imagined that there was some kind of correlation between gravity numbers and whether the product was selling well.

    I thought that the most popular niches, in which there's the most money, would be good ones for me to try to make some money as an affiliate.

    I tried to be an article marketer imagining that it was about "how many articles you have" (rather than about "who reads them" and "where they're published").

    I didn't understand the difference between "article marketing" and "article directory marketing" (and I promise you that's a helpful distinction to understand, when you're trying to be an article marketer!).

    I thought I was gaining something (rather than losing something) by getting potential customer traffic coming from a search engine to my own site via an article directory.

    I thought SEO traffic was worth having.

    I thought that page ranks actually signified something worth knowing about and thinking about.

    I thought that when you build a list, the more people who subscribe, the better, because "the biggest list" was likely to be the one that produced "the biggest income".

    I thought a squeeze page was a really good way of building a list.

    I thought that "taking action" (rather than setting off in the right direction) was what mattered.

    If you could misunderstand something fundamental, I found a way to misunderstand it.

    Unsurprisingly, like thousands of others who share most or all of those misbegotten beliefs out of the Urban Myth School of Internet Marketing, I didn't earn any money for months and months, until I got some proper education.

    Originally Posted by bakkadda View Post

    how you overcome it to be where you are right now?
    I eventually learned that all those things were totally wrong and deluded.

    I learned that what matters, when you don't know much and have information overload, is identifying one or two or three people by whom you decide to be guided, and ignoring everyone and everything else until you've acquired some judgement, and can at least fairly reliably distinguish between people repeating what they've seen everyone else saying for years (and assuming "this must work, otherwise everyone wouldn't be doing it") and people who actually know what they're talking about.

    I learned that in a field of activity like IM, in which most people are unsuccessful most of the time, the "general consensus of opinion" about things is always pretty likely to be completely wrong - or at least partly wrong - as it's lovingly regurgitated by generations of struggling/failing marketers, each on their own way toward duplicating the mistakes of the unsuccessful people trying to teach them.

    I learned that for many people, it's easier to make money selling information and coaching (and especially selling SEO services) to newbies than it is to make any money from actually doing internet marketing for themselves, and that their "information" is usually just misinformation and that they're selling it because it's an easy market for them and many never made a living from doing what they're now selling, and that it doesn't actually work, and that there are reasons for that which make sense only when you have enough experience to understand them.

    I learned that acquiring enough education to be able to identify "the right direction", so as to be able to set off in it, was what really mattered, rather than just "taking action".
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    • Profile picture of the author sidneyng
      As usual Alexa -- great sharing! That basically almost (chillingly) summarized my own online marketing journey. LOL!



      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      I suspect that's partly because so many people here are promoting something, and they have more credibility talking about their successes than about their failures. That's understandable enough, really?

      Of course there are also some who take it to ludicrous extremes and even start off threads to explain "why they're so successful", and so on (but most of those are deleted as the self-promotional nonsense they are).

      I'n not promoting anything here, and have said quite a bit about my failures. Some of which were disastrous.

      When I first started, I did absolutely everything wrong that you can do wrong, and more that nobody else would even have found ways to do wrong.

      I started off trying to promote ClickBank products, without understanding that affiliate sales come from building relationships with potential subscribers.

      I thought it was a good idea to promote products with high gravities because I imagined that there was some kind of correlation between gravity numbers and whether the product was selling well.

      I thought that the most popular niches, in which there's the most money, would be good ones for me to try to make some money as an affiliate.

      I tried to be an article marketer imagining that it was about "how many articles you have" (rather than about "who reads them" and "where they're published").

      I didn't understand the difference between "article marketing" and "article directory marketing".

      I thought I was gaining something by getting potential customer traffic coming from a search engine to my own site via an article directory.

      I thought SEO traffic was worth having.

      I thought that page ranks actually signified something worth knowing about and thinking about.

      I thought that when you build a list, the more people who subscribe, the better, because "the biggest list" was likely to be the one that produced "the biggest income".

      I thought a squeeze page was a really good way of building a list.

      I thought that "taking action" (rather than setting off in the right direction) was what mattered.

      If you could misunderstand something fundamental, I found a way to misunderstand it.

      Unsurprisingly, like thousands of others who share most or all of those misbegotten beliefs out of the Urban Myth School of Internet Marketing, I didn't earn any money for months and months, until I got some proper education.



      I eventually learned that all those things were totally wrong and deluded.

      I learned that what matters, when you don't know much and have information overload, is identifying one or two or three people by whom you decide to be guided, and ignoring everyone and everything else until you've acquired some judgement, and can at least fairly reliably distinguish between repeating what they've seen everyone else saying for years (and assuming "this must work, otherwise everyone wouldn't be doing it") and people who actually know what they're talking about.

      I learned that in a field of activity like IM, in which most people are unsuccessful most of the time, the "general consensus of opinion" about things is always pretty likely to be completely wrong - or at least partly wrong - as it's lovingly regurgitated by generations of struggling/failing marketers, each on their own way toward duplicating the mistakes of the unsuccessful people trying to teach them.

      I learned that for many people, it's easier to make money selling information (and especially selling SEO services) to newbies than it is to make any money from actually doing internet marketing for themselves.

      I learned that acquiring enough education to be able to identify "the right direction", so as to be able to set off in it, was what mattered, rather than "taking action".
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    • Profile picture of the author Kyawikyo
      Thanks, I appreciate this advice and I will take it as my very own. May be it is all I needed.
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    • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      I suspect that's partly because so many people here are promoting something, and they have more credibility talking about their successes than about their failures. That's understandable enough, really? (Of course there are also some who take it to self-promotional extremes and even start off threads to explain "why they're so successful", and so on.)

      I'n not promoting anything here, and have said quite a bit about my failures. Some of which were disastrous.

      When I first started, I did absolutely everything wrong that you can do wrong, and more that nobody else would even have found ways to do wrong.

      I started off trying to promote ClickBank products, without understanding that affiliate sales come from building relationships with potential subscribers.

      I thought it was a good idea to promote products with high gravities because I imagined that there was some kind of correlation between gravity numbers and whether the product was selling well.

      I thought that the most popular niches, in which there's the most money, would be good ones for me to try to make some money as an affiliate.

      I tried to be an article marketer imagining that it was about "how many articles you have" (rather than about "who reads them" and "where they're published").

      I didn't understand the difference between "article marketing" and "article directory marketing".

      I thought I was gaining something by getting potential customer traffic coming from a search engine to my own site via an article directory.

      I thought SEO traffic was worth having.

      I thought that page ranks actually signified something worth knowing about and thinking about.

      I thought that when you build a list, the more people who subscribe, the better, because "the biggest list" was likely to be the one that produced "the biggest income".

      I thought a squeeze page was a really good way of building a list.

      I thought that "taking action" (rather than setting off in the right direction) was what mattered.

      If you could misunderstand something fundamental, I found a way to misunderstand it.

      Unsurprisingly, like thousands of others who share most or all of those misbegotten beliefs out of the Urban Myth School of Internet Marketing, I didn't earn any money for months and months, until I got some proper education.



      I eventually learned that all those things were totally wrong and deluded.

      I learned that what matters, when you don't know much and have information overload, is identifying one or two or three people by whom you decide to be guided, and ignoring everyone and everything else until you've acquired some judgement, and can at least fairly reliably distinguish between people repeating what they've seen everyone else saying for years (and assuming "this must work, otherwise everyone wouldn't be doing it") and people who actually know what they're talking about.

      I learned that in a field of activity like IM, in which most people are unsuccessful most of the time, the "general consensus of opinion" about things is always pretty likely to be completely wrong - or at least partly wrong - as it's lovingly regurgitated by generations of struggling/failing marketers, each on their own way toward duplicating the mistakes of the unsuccessful people trying to teach them.

      I learned that for many people, it's easier to make money selling information and coaching (and especially selling SEO services) to newbies than it is to make any money from actually doing internet marketing for themselves, and that their "information" is usually just misinformation and that they're selling it because it's an easy market for them and many never made a living from doing what they're now selling, and that it doesn't actually work, and that there are reasons for that which make sense only when you have enough experience to understand them.

      I learned that acquiring enough education to be able to identify "the right direction", so as to be able to set off in it, was what really mattered, rather than just "taking action".
      This is a wonderful post Alexa, on how you described yourself in the beginning struggling and finding your way, to becoming a full time internet marketer.

      I have always wondered though, why you don't use this forum for promotional purposes?

      For example your link going to "how to write an article" -- I bet you could easily make good chunk of money teaching people step by step how you write an article, where you go to publish it, and showing your stats of how much traffic you generate with your traffic strategy.

      Anyways I always look forward to reading your post Keep up the great work.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by MKCookins View Post

        This is a wonderful post Alexa, on how you described yourself in the beginning struggling and finding your way, to becoming a full time internet marketer.

        I have always wondered though, why you don't use this forum for promotional purposes?
        I'm not in any IM-related or MMO-related niches at all, and no writing services to offer at all, so I actually have nothing to promote, here.

        Originally Posted by MKCookins View Post

        For example your link going to "how to write an article" -- I bet you could easily make good chunk of money teaching people step by step how you write an article, where you go to publish it, and showing your stats of how much traffic you generate with your traffic strategy.
        Well, thank you, but I don't disclose my niches, you see ... having put time into finding some relatively non-competitive ones.
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        • Profile picture of the author MKCookins
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          I'm not in any IM-related or MMO-related niches at all, and no writing services to offer at all, so I actually have nothing to promote, here.
          That makes since there

          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          Well, thank you, but I don't disclose my niches, you see ... having put time into finding some relatively non-competitive ones.
          This also makes perfect since. Thank you for the clarification -- and hope your business continues to grow
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    • Profile picture of the author DoubleOhDave
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      I learned that in a field of activity like IM, in which most people are unsuccessful most of the time, the "general consensus of opinion" about things is always pretty likely to be completely wrong - or at least partly wrong - as it's lovingly regurgitated by generations of struggling/failing marketers, each on their own way toward duplicating the mistakes of the unsuccessful people trying to teach them..
      truest thing ever!
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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    I think most people in this industry definitely fail more times than they succeed. I sure do.

    The key to succeeding is recognizing this and realizing that failure is ok since it happens to everyone and gets you one step closer to your next success. You can't have the successes without the failures first. So keep that in mind and welcome failures. That simple change in attitude will have you succeeding far more often.
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  • Profile picture of the author Moneymaker2012
    I never believed you can be a IM star without failing. We all faced some difficulties at the start of business,
    I faced time management and conversion problems alot in the earlier days but soon I learned to make things perfect.
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  • Profile picture of the author dadamson
    You need to be a strong person to succeed in ANY field. Becoming the best at whatever you do is not about luck or even doing everything right. It is about doing everything WRONG then learning from your mistakes and doing it better the next time around.

    You can put a blind person in a maze, he is going to hit the walls a lot, he is going to feel like giving up. But if he keeps going no matter how many walls he walks into he will always reach the goal in the end.

    ^ Can I copyright that??

    I have had my fair share of failures too. In fact my first 2 years of IM were continuous failures with NO hope of making it.

    Perseverance got me to a place where I can work comfortably in my own home and my own hours and I have been doing this for the last year and 9 months ad it's great!

    Just take action and learn from your failures.
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  • Profile picture of the author retsced
    We live in a world of opposites. All successes are born out of failures. You cannot have one without the other. As soon as people actually get this below the surface level of understanding, the sooner they can expect, and accept failures as a necessity to growth and progress.

    I welcome failure. As a matter of fact, if I'm not failing, I'm simply not trying hard enough to succeed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Arthurren
      Alexa posted some incredibly wise guidance. I've not yet begun with what I intend, and have no qualifying basis to offer web-based marketing advice. However, I have been a business owner, and bucked trends. The most important aspect of any business, to me, is to work from your heart, what you love doing. Gimmicks are temporary and you may end up using your gift(s) in a fruitless cycle, the creation of even more gimmicks that prove useless.

      Further, the exchange currency has become more finite for most of us. If someone is going to part with a little disposable currency, they're going to expect a benefit. For instance, I subscribed to Warriors for that reason. There is a benefit in learning from others who have the technical expertise I sorely need. (Thank YOU, Warriors!)
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  • Profile picture of the author Lynn Terry
    I haven't considered anything a true failure, but rather a learning experience. I started on the web way back in the 90's so it was a lot of "trial and error" - which is a lot different than failure. You have to figure out what doesn't work, as well as what does. And the only way to do that is to test, track, improve, and basically figure it out in the trenches.

    I once lost $40k in annual income overnight due to a PPC policy update. Did I consider that a failure? No. But a great lesson learned. I decided I didn't want to "play the slots" anymore because I *personally* prefer an easier model with more passive revenue sources - so I stepped away from that and went with an aggressive organic marketing strategy - which is still paying off nicely! Not a failure, but an awesome turning point.

    That's just one example. In over 16 years, there have been plenty. lol.
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    Lynn Terry
    ClickNewz.com
    Twitter | Facebook | Google+ | LinkedIn

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    • Profile picture of the author KenJ
      Failure actually makes you succeed faster at the next attempt. Because there are fewer ways you can mess up. You start to know what works and what doesn't.
      I know someone who is launching an offline business next Tuesday. We have been busy planning things for a month or so. I have told him what to do to get his first customers because I Know. I know because I have made lots of mistakes that he will not have to make.

      KenJ
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  • Profile picture of the author lunarninja
    Definitely more failure thank success on warrior forum and real life in General.

    -Lunar Ninja.
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    Looking FOR A TRUSTED HOSTING Provider? 12+ Years over 150,000+ Happy Customers! 1(877) 586-2772 Ex. 2441 http://www.lpwebhosting.com/

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  • Profile picture of the author RogueOne
    Banned
    If one out of ten of my ideas pay off, I'm doing good.

    It's like planting seeds. You know some will not grow. So you keep on planting more. One day you look back and stuff is sprouting up everywhere.
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      Originally Posted by RogueOne View Post

      If one out of ten of my ideas pay off, I'm doing good.

      It's like planting seeds. You know some will not grow. So you keep on planting more. One day you look back and stuff is sprouting up everywhere.

      yup I've planted some crops that failed - but the ones that didn't - flourished and spread nicely.

      I'm one of those people who is not afraid of failure - I think an entrepreneur should expect it - but be able to learn from it and start again and keep on going.
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  • Profile picture of the author seobro
    Oh yes, my failures are many. Also, few are my successes. Still, it is worth the effort to remember the good old 95 - 5 rule as in 95 books you write will flop and five books will be a success. Keep on running. The finish line is now in view.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennisknows
    I've failed so many times it's crazy.. Still failing. The hardest part of it all is realizing that everything you DID was wrong and you pretty much have to start over and keep pushing.

    But you're starting over from a good point; a point at which you've learned a lot.

    The secret to IM is proving value in one way or another.
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    "May the optimism of your tomorrow fuel your drive for today"
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  • Profile picture of the author John Atkins
    I know this is about our failures, but this picture below is good for this thread because it shows that everyone experiences failures, even the most successful companies.

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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    Yes, failure is simply a part of the process. Usually the first part, and often the last part.

    Mankind did not evolve in one flash from the primordial goo. It took a few billion years of patience, false starts, and lots of epic failures (seriously, what the hell is a platypus anyway?)

    Each small success, however, was rewarded and built upon. And over time, a pretty successful world of self-sustaining biodiversity emerged. Putting aside the unfortunate fact that we have put all of that in terrible danger, life is a pretty remarkable system.

    Now, it doesn't take a few billion years to figure out IM. But it does take patience, flexibility and the willingness to fail - and fail well. That means embracing it for the experience you have gained, and discarding it quickly to adapt and live to create again.

    I have failed spectacularly. But I have learned, and I have come back with some pretty great rebounds too.

    Proceed with caution, but not too much.
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  • Profile picture of the author teresarothaar
    I got into unspeakable debt to obtain a B.S. in Math & Computer Science. I failed when I could not obtain any type of job in the tech industry, not even at minimum wage.

    I toyed with the idea of a junk removal company. This model failed, as I didn't have the equipment, labor, or connections, and didn't have the resources to get them.

    I decided to start a "marketing" company, which failed because I had no idea what I was selling.

    I started a pet sitting company, which failed because the demand around here isn't for dog walking or cat sitting, but overnight dog boarding, which I didn't have the resources to accommodate.

    I tried being a Beachbody Coach. I failed because I don't have the personality for an MLM (it also didn't help that I don't believe in the main retail product, Shakeology).

    Now I've gotten together with my husband to market copywriting services. We haven't been in business long enough to fail, or succeed. I'm also going to start producing PLR content and seeing if I can build an additional income source there.

    I hope everyone is right, and that I can build on my failures instead of having them drag me down further. I know that if I don't keep trying, I will never succeed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by teresarothaar View Post

      Now I've gotten together with my husband to market copywriting services. We haven't been in business long enough to fail, or succeed. I'm also going to start producing PLR content and seeing if I can build an additional income source there.

      I hope everyone is right, and that I can build on my failures instead of having them drag me down further.
      You can. Partly because you've learned stuff along the way that will be helpful that you're only barely aware that you've learned, and you've acquired more judgement and experience, and partly because you're probably trying better and more promising and more suitable and more marketable things now than you have in the past.

      Originally Posted by teresarothaar View Post

      I know that if I don't keep trying, I will never succeed.
      This is also true.
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  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    I agree with you that it is important to learn from other people’s mistakes.

    My biggest mistake was the fact that I was too confident because of the quality of my work but I ignored everything about internet marketing.

    If you don't know how to promote your products, their quality doesn't matter.

    Now I can understand how ignorant I was, but at that time I believed that ‘I was not a newbie’ while this was an illusion.

    You will stop being a newbie only after learning one million lessons and when you will have positive results from your efforts.

    I could overcome the problems I had because I was extremely persistent. I still have various problems that I’m trying to solve, especially after the last Google update, but I’m always persistent. I keep finding solutions.








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  • Profile picture of the author AlexGeorge
    Most of my failure came from not carrying it enough research on my market and getting into niches far too saturated. Jumping from one project to the next every month also contributed to my failures, as I couldn't focus on making money with one thing. It can be hard, but you just have to ignore any ideas about other things and concentrate on the project at hand.
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  • Profile picture of the author teresarothaar
    I'm guilty of hopping around too much, though thankfully I didn't waste hundreds of dollars buying dozens of WSO's. I purchased only four, and I found two of them to be especially helpful. I don't feel I need more.

    I am now concentrating on two related ideas: a copywriting business combined with writing PLR. The copywriting is targeting high-end clients who want custom content, while the PLR material will be suited to IM'ers looking for cheap SEO articles.

    I still have the fitness blog I started when I was a Beachbody Coach. I'm going to keep it in case I decide to do something with it later. It might make a nice fitness AM site.
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  • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
    What has always SHOCKED me and something that has changed very little over the decades I have been in business (offline and online) is that we are not taught the basics of business in school.

    I don't mean the basics of how to work for someone else or how economics work (which is good to know but does little to prepare us for running our own businesses)

    To me it is a tragic and painful omission of our education system that we are not taught:

    1. Consumer psychology - what makes people buy, the fundamentals of consumer behavior (Robert Cialdini should be as required reading in high school as Shakespeare is)

    2. The various phases of starting a business from idea generation, market research through bootstrapping and growth

    3. The basics of conducting business online (main way to get a site up, main traffic sources, methods of monetization) I realize things change very fast, but the basics would be a good start so our kids come out with a basic understanding of online commerce and if not how to start their own online business, how they may have been influenced to buy even if they didn't know it

    4. Business Operation - the guts of how a business operates from tools and systems to processes and financing...but with a small business/sole proprietor point of view

    No wonder so many people struggle and fail at business, there is no other way to learn than to either spend money on coaching or through trial and error (I prefer the combination of these myself)

    Why don't we speak up more about this given that small business is the economic engine, jobs engine, financial engine and innovation engine of our society?

    Just sayin....

    Jeff
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    • Profile picture of the author OliviasDad
      What has been posted in this thread so far has been GREAT!

      Thanks to everyone who has shared their experiences so far.

      I'm a newbie, and I've seen so many sales pages with so many promises and "WonderCase Studies" that my eyes bleed and there is so much sunshine up my patootie that I fear a supernova is imminent...

      This thread is wonderful. This thread is balancing. I feel myself slowly coming away from the edge.

      Thanks.

      Cheers!
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      Originally Posted by jbsmith View Post

      What has always SHOCKED me and something that has changed very little over the decades I have been in business (offline and online) is that we are not taught the basics of business in school.

      I don't mean the basics of how to work for someone else or how economics work (which is good to know but does little to prepare us for running our own businesses)

      To me it is a tragic and painful omission of our education system that we are not taught:

      1. Consumer psychology - what makes people buy, the fundamentals of consumer behavior (Robert Cialdini should be as required reading in high school as Shakespeare is)

      2. The various phases of starting a business from idea generation, market research through bootstrapping and growth

      3. The basics of conducting business online (main way to get a site up, main traffic sources, methods of monetization) I realize things change very fast, but the basics would be a good start so our kids come out with a basic understanding of online commerce and if not how to start their own online business, how they may have been influenced to buy even if they didn't know it

      4. Business Operation - the guts of how a business operates from tools and systems to processes and financing...but with a small business/sole proprietor point of view

      No wonder so many people struggle and fail at business, there is no other way to learn than to either spend money on coaching or through trial and error (I prefer the combination of these myself)

      Why don't we speak up more about this given that small business is the economic engine, jobs engine, financial engine and innovation engine of our society?

      Just sayin....

      Jeff
      Jeff, the Canadian public school system teaches collectivism (how to serve) not individualism - so that is why business is not taught (in my humble opinion)
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      I love life!
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      • Profile picture of the author cypherslock
        Originally Posted by Karen Blundell View Post

        Jeff, the Canadian public school system teaches collectivism (how to serve) not individualism - so that is why business is not taught (in my humble opinion)
        Now, it's indoctrination instead of true education...
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  • Profile picture of the author Janice Sperry
    I have NEVER failed. I have had a LOT of setbacks and made a LOT of mistakes in many, many areas of IM. (Just having some fun with semantics, not trying to correct anyone.)

    I find it so much more productive to learn from my mistakes but to focus my time and attention on my future endeavors.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    Failures are the learning bridges we must cross to reach the success on the other side. They are growth opportunities.
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    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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    • Profile picture of the author DoubleOhDave
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      Failures are the learning bridges we must cross to reach the success on the other side. They are growth opportunities.
      Sh*t, I am goin to be tired...I am crossing a LOT of them!
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      • Profile picture of the author condra
        I've failed a lot and learned a lot, and improved a lot.

        Worst thing I did was pay for spammy crappy links and got kicked off Amazon and Google within a couple of weeks.
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        Abstract brand name generator. FREE.
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  • Profile picture of the author seoman123
    If you dont fail and make mistakes you will never learn, failing is a good thing, it teaches you to have determination and drive
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  • Profile picture of the author BocaKenK
    Banned
    Everyone is going to have failures. All that matters is how you move on.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Quitting too early in the game whenever i would reach 500 subscribers, and only like 5 sales. I thought i should be making more. Then one day i said the hell with it and just let the autoresponder/squeeze page work itself, then my sales started to come in daily, and when i looked at my subscribers list... the number was astronomical. Don't give up, even after just a few sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author iLinkedin
    Well, first 2 years, i've lost my 9-5 Job, about $10,000 just to learn. But now, i'm proud that i never give up. Just focus, focus, focus
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