Other ways to get opt-ins?

by rrm
7 replies
As far as I can tell, the standard to getting people to sign up for your report, newsletter, free goodie, whatever, has been the squeeze page. But lately I have read some comments, by well-respected warriors, highlighting how they are relying less on squeeze pages, and more on getting people to subscribe by other means.

I know that Alexa has mentioned that she has done some testing and she (as far as I know) uses squeeze pages very little if at all at this point. And obviously she gets lots of subscribers.

I have never not used a squeeze page to get sign-ups. But sign-ups in the past, for me, are sporadic at best. I realize that there are probably lots of reasons for that.

Here is the specific reason for my question: I am about to get a medical diagnosis-related site up and going (me being a nurse and all) and I'm still debating about how I'll be making all the particulars work out. I will be making a lot of videos (and I do mean LOTS of them, but short) for Youtube before I ever go live with the site. I want to have subscribers before I ever launch. What's the point of having a site go live when I will have virtually no readers at first? Some of the best stuff on the site will simply get buried in some back page and nobody will see them when I first put them up. So, I want to have subscribers already waiting in the wings, whom I will feed with emails until the site is up. Anyone do (has done) this sort of thing? (There is nothing new under the sun, so I know you have! ) Also, is it important to have a certain minimum number of subscribers before going live?

If you have any good ideas on how to get subscribers without using a squeeze page considering what I have in mind, or if I would be better off sending to a squeeze page in this instance, please let me know!

Ron
#optins #ways
  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Ron,

    As in many facets of Internet marketing, you will only know what works best for you as you test and track different approaches. Products, niches, platforms, etc vary significantly and Internet marketing is never "one size fits all."

    I do have a concern about something you said:
    "What's the point of having a site go live when I will have virtually no readers at first? Some of the best stuff on the site will simply get buried in some back page and nobody will see them when I first put them up. So, I want to have subscribers already waiting in the wings, whom I will feed with emails until the site is up."

    So I'm going to ask, if you don't have "some of your best stuff on the site" how are you going to show the value of your offerings to your prospects and how are you going to entice them to wait in the wings? Sending them emails while you build your site, in my humble opinion, is not going to give them the real sense of the quality and quantity of relevant content that your site contains. In addition, it's not going to help your search engine "attractiveness" to have nothing then dump a whole bunch of content in all at once.

    My personal feeling is that I would put up a dozen or so videos on site along with the categories or sections and subsections that you eventually plan to fill. By doing this, you at least give your new visitors a taste of your quality and an overview of how you eventually plan to have a very comprehensive offering.

    I say, build your subscriber list while you build the content on your site and don't lock anybody out just because you don't have all the content you eventually plan to have. The solution to not burying your "best stuff" is to resurrect it occasionally by doing an email or blog post along the lines of "I did a video awhile back on (such and such topic) that proved to be very popular with my subscribers. I realize many of you are new and may have missed it so here is the link . . . " yada, yada.

    You might even consider updating the content in a slight way or two, thereby having a great reason to want to share it again with your subscribers.

    Anyway, I wish you lots of success in this business.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author rrm
      Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

      I do have a concern about something you said:
      "What's the point of having a site go live when I will have virtually no readers at first? Some of the best stuff on the site will simply get buried in some back page and nobody will see them when I first put them up. So, I want to have subscribers already waiting in the wings, whom I will feed with emails until the site is up."

      So I'm going to ask, if you don't have "some of your best stuff on the site" how are you going to show the value of your offerings to your prospects and how are you going to entice them to wait in the wings? Sending them emails while you build your site, in my humble opinion, is not going to give them the real sense of the quality and quantity of relevant content that your site contains. In addition, it's not going to help your search engine "attractiveness" to have nothing then dump a whole bunch of content in all at once.
      I see your point. It's not that I don't want to put up my best stuff first. I was thinking that this site would only show a person or two (whatever trickle of traffic I would have at first) some of the really good material, which would then scroll away as I addd new material. I was thinking (wrongfully?) that if I had some subscribers first, I could have a half way decent number of readers from the start.

      I was considering having several articles up first, a site that was "fleshed out" a little so people there would see some value, instead of coming to a site that was naked and devoid of anything that would keep them coming back.

      Thanks for your thoughts, Steve. I will have videos in the site as well, basically the same ones that I'll have on Youtube. I will use my site to encourage opt-ins and perhaps through the videos in Youtube as well?

      Thanks again!

      Ron
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Ron, how about setting up and maintaining a "Best of..." page, highlighting that stuff you don't want buried? Put an opt-in form above the links, along with a message something like "if you were on my Insider's List, you'd have seen this when I posted it".

        Hand pick the content in such a way that joining your list is the only reasonable action...
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  • Profile picture of the author rrm
    Thanks, John.

    "Best of page..." Another example from the annals of "Why didn't I think of that?"

    Instead of using a squeeze page, why not just drive them to my site, where they could sign up then?

    Ron
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  • Profile picture of the author Hartmann
    Put some of your content up so that people can get a taster...just like they give you a taster in the supermarket when a new product is coming out. Get a following on facebook that directs people to your site. Pay for likes. Set up an opt in form on Facebook and run some paid advertising to that too. Have an opt in form on the site and an exit pop to sign up when they leave. Also distribute free reports with a call to action to sign up to your newsletter. Distribute them to doc sharing sites. Still think a squeeze page would convert better though.
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  • Profile picture of the author KevinW
    Use squeeze pages but drop your optin forms on every site, blog, and facebook page you have.

    With your squeeze page design test several. Some of my best are not your typical "squeeze pages". I'm adding more content than the old school squeeze page. Using optin forms above the fold of course but also dropping forms below the fold where I'm providing more content. It's generating high quality leads/subscribers for me every day.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      Ron,

      Kevin (above) brings up a great point. Make every page of content you have the entry point to becoming a subscriber. You do that by putting a sign-up form on each page of your site and at least a link to your sign-up on every article.

      Once your business is a little established, separate pages (and videos) will become indexed by the search engines. Your content (if it is good) will be picked up and reviewed by other sites, directories, etc.

      In essence, every piece of content (including videos, audios, reports, even images) you publish becomes a "doorway" to your business and web site. So it makes sense to have a sign up method or link on every entry point.

      I hope that sounds worthy of the little bit of extra work it might entail. Your content really is "bread crumbs" back to your business.

      Good luck,

      Steve
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