low price high volume amazon sites

by IMDESTROYER Banned
9 replies
does anyone have any experience with these? are they worth the time?
#amazon #high #low #price #sites #volume
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Yes, I have two of these. One for books and CD's (rightly or wrongly I have them all on one site - I think maybe rightly, actually), and one for "gimmicky gifts" (many around the $10-$40 price-range).

    For me, they're very much worth it, but not so much for the commissions the sales from those sites earn for me. As you doubtless know, Amazon has its own weird way of working out your commission level (percentage), each month, according to the number of items you've sold during the month. So such sites (provided you can get enough traffic to them easily enough) are very well worthwhile, to make sure that you're always on the highest commission-level each month. It effectively doubles (+) your income from the more expensive, more serious things that you're really trying to sell.

    Originally Posted by IMDESTROYER View Post

    are they worth the time?
    It depends how much time you spend on them, I suppose. I get away with very little additional effort for them, myself, and one of my VA's looks after them.
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  • Profile picture of the author pizzatherapy
    Great advice there Alexa.

    You have figured out what many fail to grasp about selling Amazon products.

    The more you sell, (that is items you sell), the higher your earning percentage. It is so weird that this is based on an actual number of items rather than a percentage of your sales...

    Truly a bizarre system!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by pizzatherapy View Post

      Great advice there Alexa.

      You have figured out what many fail to grasp about selling Amazon products.

      The more you sell, (that is items you sell), the higher your earning percentage. It is so weird that this is based on an actual number of items rather than a percentage of your sales...

      Truly a bizarre system!
      No insider information, but I believe the performance tiers reward people for sending more prolific buyers, as opposed to the dollar/euro/whatever amount of an individual sale.

      How many amazon associates have stories about promoting one thing and having people buy totally different things? Or buying multiples of an item? Or adding a $10 item to a $15 order to avoid paying $5 in shipping?

      Once Amazon identifies you as a multiple item buyer, they have more opportunities to get back in your pocket via targeting items related to what you bought. People that add items to their order are more valuable to Amazon than people who buy one item and check out.

      I also think they're smart enough to realize that without some incentive to sell a bunch of items every month, a large portion of their associates would be beating each other up over a relative handful of high ticket items. I also think that idea is behind some of the commission caps in some categories. It's to encourage associates to promote a wider array of products.

      Edit:

      To answer the original question, I've advocated a mix of big ticket items and smaller, impulse type items, even though I've never set up sites specifically to sell either.
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  • Profile picture of the author seonutshell
    Im making a site like this now which i hope does well. Im hoping people decide to buy a rolex with there onesie though
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    • Profile picture of the author thedog
      The good thing is, the competition is less crowded.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by thedog View Post

        The good thing is, the competition is less crowded.
        I'm not so sure about this one, Rob? It seems to me that there's overwhelmingly more competition among affiliates for promoting the Amazon "gifts" I promote for $20-$40 or so (because so many people have sites with that stuff) than there is for the more serious $400 - $1,000 products I promote by email to my list-subscribers in some niches. Those, for me, are the less competitive ones (and that matters to me - I've selected them accordingly!). But the competition for the "cheap stuff" doesn't actually matter to me at all, because it doesn't affect my traffic-generation methods for those sites, which I'm using only as a slightly "artificial" way to inflate my monthly sales numbers (items) for the reasons explained above.
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  • Profile picture of the author TroyCo
    I started about 6 interlinked amazon affiliate sites a while back and have not noticed a difference in volume from my $200 to $400 items from the $20 items. Now I should mention that my amazon sites are not a focus for me but mostly a showcase for my SEO business but they do get traffic and sales. I would just say that unless your pushing LARGE amounts of traffic the cash made from higher ticket items will make you more money


    For example:
    30 sales of a $200 item will make you about $360
    200 sales of a $20 item will make you about $280
    based on the current commission scale

    There are just as many people out there buying fancy watches and electronics as there are buying small gifts and water bottles
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by TroyCo View Post

      I started about 6 interlinked amazon affiliate sites a while back and have not noticed a difference in volume from my $200 to $400 items from the $20 items. Now I should mention that my amazon sites are not a focus for me but mostly a showcase for my SEO business but they do get traffic and sales. I would just say that unless your pushing LARGE amounts of traffic the cash made from higher ticket items will make you more money


      For example:
      30 sales of a $200 item will make you about $360
      200 sales of a $20 item will make you about $280
      based on the current commission scale

      There are just as many people out there buying fancy watches and electronics as there are buying small gifts and water bottles
      The trick is to use the low ticket sales to up the commissions on the bigger ticket items. Selling enough $8 books, $2 accessory cords, or whatever to increase your commission rate from 4% to 6% is like giving yourself a 50% raise on the bigger ticket items. Instead of making $360 by selling the 30 $200 items, you would make $540 for the same sales.

      Short version:

      Low price items in bulk to increase commission rate.

      Higher price items to increase your profits.

      Both, not one or the other.
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      • Profile picture of the author murtagh
        I think John has got it spot on in the post above. Don't expect to make a full time living off low price affiliate commissions (unless you're #1 for a buyer KW that gets insane searches)

        Here's what I do:

        1. My 1st niche is in the coffee category and I target items in the $200-400 range. I typically sell about 40-70 items every month which places me in the 6.5% commission range

        2. My 2nd niche is related to books and every month I manage to have around 300 sales.

        This helps push my commissions in the 7.5% range and increases my commissions easily by about $200-300 (counting the commissions from the books)
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