How to Get a Complete Ebook Written Within 24 Hours At Dirt Cheap Prices..Amazingly Effective Trick

35 replies
This is something I realized very recently. A normal writer who writes an ebook takes about 4 weeks or more to finish it but there is a very effective trick you can use right now to get a high quality ebook written within 24 hours.

Here is the process-

1- Prepare the index yourself with the topics which are needed to be covered.

2- Determine how long you want each chapter to be?

3- Shortlist all the high quality writers on elance, this forum or any other freelancing site.

4- Select atleast 5 Writers or more to do the task.

5- Give one or two chapters to each writer instead of asking them to do the whole ebook.

So let's see how this works...Prepare an index with 10 chapters ie 10 topics...Give those topics out as titles of articles to all the shortlisted writers and give them the word count.

Most writers complete 5 or more articles within 24 hours therefore you can have a complete ebook done within 24 hours by just spreading it across different writers.

Since the writers don't know that they are writing for an ebook they won't charge extra high prices but make sure you let them know that you expect extremely good quality of work.

So in a way you pay less and get work done extremely fast. Let me know what you guys think about this.
#cheap #complete #dirt #ebook #effective #hours #priceamazingly #trick #written
  • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
    Sounds like a good plan.

    The problem may be in writing styles. It can be awkward reading if the style is noticeably different from chapter to chapter.
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    • Profile picture of the author ryanman
      Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

      Sounds like a good plan.

      The problem may be in writing styles. It can be awkward reading if the style is noticeably different from chapter to chapter.
      Thats why it's important to let all the writers know what style you would prefer...It would be always good to make it in conversational tone.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
        Originally Posted by ryanman View Post

        Thats why it's important to let all the writers know what style you would prefer...It would be always good to make it in conversational tone.
        Even so, a conversational tone will vary in style from writer to writer.

        Of course, you could edit the articles as needed to align the styles, and you would still save time over having one person write it or writing it yourself.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jillian Slack
        Originally Posted by ryanman View Post

        Thats why it's important to let all the writers know what style you would prefer...It would be always good to make it in conversational tone.
        My idea of a conversational tone still may not mesh with another writer's idea of what a conversational tone would sound like, so you still risk having an ebook or report that doesn't flow well.

        One way around this would be to take everything that is turned in and go over it, rewriting or tweaking where necessary, to make sure it sounds nice.

        Of course, you'd want to go over it before posting it for sale anyway.

        Jill
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    • Profile picture of the author MaxReferrals
      Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

      ....The problem may be in writing styles. It can be awkward reading if the style is noticeably different from chapter to chapter.
      Dan's right. Factor in your editing time, and I doubt very seriously it is a "complete" ebook as you suggested.

      Not to nitpick, and sure, maybe it is complete... but not in the sense that it will OVERDELIVER to someone who is paying for it (or requesting it for free) and blow people away.

      We need to remind ourselves that reputation for delivering quality depth of content always trumps speed in producing it.

      I like your plan from the sense that it forces you to outsource, and thereby makes you to take action.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Hackett
    Sounds like a good idea. As stated though, the individuals' writing styles may conflict. Seems like it wouldn't be too difficult to go through and edit it the way you want it to sound when you have it all together :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author traces2757
    I don't think you need to withhold from the writers that the articles are for an e-book. A writer will usually charge by the length of article no matter what.

    Just remember, though, that if you try to pay as cheap a price as possible for the articles, you're most likely going to get cheap-looking content. Pay for quality writing right up front and you'll get better results when selling your e-book.

    And yes, there will probably be noticeable differences in the writing styles, no matter what. You might want to let an editor go through the whole thing and polish it up before you finally consider it ready to sell.

    Just some suggestions.
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    • Profile picture of the author angela99
      It's a good idea, in theory. In practice... the idea makes my head hurt. :-)

      I could see this working if you wanted to use the "string of beads" method of book construction, where each chapter is a complete entity, talking about something or other, without referring to anything in any of the other chapters.

      And if the topic was straightforward -- weight loss for example. There are only so many ways you can approach the topic: basically, it all boils down to eat less.

      In practice, if you wanted an ebook of ten chapters with each writer writing two chapters, you'd you'd need to find FIVE experts on a topic, instead of just one.

      If you were writing an ebook on the way you make $200K a year in IM for example, HOW would you outsource that to FIVE writers? You'd need to find five writers who understand IM, explain exactly how you wanted them to cover the section you've given to them, and make sure that they knew enough about IM to be able to handle it.

      Believe me, it's hard enough to deal with one writer on a project, let alone five. No disrespect to writers, I'm one, and I love writers. But I'd rather chew off my own arm than try this process. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author John Taylor
    Ryan,

    I think using..

    Amazingly Effective Trick
    in your thread title suggests that you've tried this
    when clearly you haven't.

    Why don't you give it a go and then report back?

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author R Hagel
    About five years ago I wrote a book (for myself). A year after that I updated it and added more content. One of my customers told me that he got the sense that two different people had created the book. I think my "tone" changed slightly over the year. Maybe I was a little more excited when I first wrote it, or maybe more excited about the new discoveries I added. Who knows.

    Point is, a customer noted a shift in a book with the SAME writer. Just imagine what it would be like to read a book by five different writers. As Angela said, the writers couldn't cross reference other info in the book, build on what's being taught, etc.

    If you want to create a book fast and have someone else do the work -- for FREE -- then have a dozen JV partners (experts in your niche) write an exclusive article for your ebook.

    Cheers,
    Becky
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  • Profile picture of the author Carlton Johnson
    Hmm, interesting.

    This is actually something I was thinking about doing, however, I was going to write about 40% of the book and then outsource 60% to my favorite writer, but I have also considered doing it this way and just outsource the whole thing bit by bit.

    If I did do it this way I think I would have to go through the whole book and make it my own as much as possible by putting my writing style and tone in. I am going to give this a try in a couple of months time.

    I personally can't be bothered to do all the research sometimes if it is a topic I am not that interested in or am not an expert in and I know writers that are a lot quicker and better at writing and researching than me - it's what they do for a living. I don't mind going through the whole thing and tweaking it to make it my own.

    If the odd one or two people thinks the writing style has changed I won't lose any sleep over it and neither will they if the content is awesome.

    Well, that's my view anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jesus Perez
    Did anyone else catch the irony/humor in this?

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  • Profile picture of the author Jaysmyne
    I think it is probably really good in theory, also depends on the subject of the ebook but in practice it is probably a big mess.
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  • Profile picture of the author jacktackett
    Large publishers, especially in the computer industry, do this all the time. But as someone stated most of the chapters in the book are pretty much stand alone. The lead author then goes through the book with the various other editors and molds it into a whole. For the most part it works, but different styles do show through no matter what.

    Other publishers do this when creating anthologies as well as other collections.

    Textbooks are notorious for this - but not many of those have any personality in them.

    I've done this with ebooks as well as with computer books.

    The only thing I would disagree with in this example is the 24 hour time period. I've done this and based on my past experience you are not going to get this done in 24 hours.

    best,
    --Jack
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  • Profile picture of the author Odhinn
    What happens when one writer wants to reference something in their chapter that they're not sure is easily understood by the target audience? They'd either write in a very simple "baby-step" tone, or decide to go into great detail on the supporting info, which, presumably, has been covered elsewhere already. Either way, that diminishes the quality of the writing a great deal.
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    • Profile picture of the author jacktackett
      Originally Posted by Odhinn View Post

      What happens when one writer wants to reference something in their chapter that they're not sure is easily understood by the target audience? They'd either write in a very simple "baby-step" tone, or decide to go into great detail on the supporting info, which, presumably, has been covered elsewhere already. Either way, that diminishes the quality of the writing a great deal.
      This is typically handled in a call out, or a note to the lead author to resolve in the final edit of the book. If the topic is covered elsewhere in the book, then you should just have to reference it and move on (like "For more information see Blah, on page X).

      Blah and X will have to be backfilled by the lead author or an editor during the final construction phase.

      Which means all writers on the project must have the table of contents/outline (what the OP called an index - but they're really not the same). If a writer does run into this situation they can at least address it as above, or -gasp -pick up the phone and call the other writer to discuss to see if they're covering it in sufficient detail.

      Your concern is very easily handled so there's no need for concern.

      best,
      --Jack
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
    It occurs to me that this must be a good idea if there is so much resistance to it.

    It's clear that this is a method not suitable for all types of eBooks. But, for some types of eBooks, it may be just fine. Instead of dismissing it and saying why it won't work, it might be better to look at how it could work. Maybe it wouldn't work for your type of eBooks. But, that doesn't mean that it won't work for others, perhaps even a future eBook of your own.

    I remember that I used this method several years ago to put a book together for a giveaway. It worked out fine.

    In fact, you can even play up on the fact that the eBook is written by different authors, different experts.

    Imagine you were writing a book on building a house. Don't you think it would be a strong selling point if the chapter on roofing was written by a professional roofer, the wiring portion was written by an electrician and the plumbing section was written by a professional plumber?

    Perhaps getting a book "written within 24 hours" is a bit of a stretch, but this method can still be a time-saver and, on top of that and perhaps more importantly, serve as a way of getting higher quality information as well.

    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    Personally I would not do this. If you have the outline above then it really does not take long to write it yourself anyway, perhaps 48 hours at most.
    Maybe it takes you 48 hours, but that's certainly not the case for everyone. I did an outline for an eBook a while ago. 2,688 hours later, it's still not done.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kael41
    I've actually had this request several times, and every single time i've said no. This is due to "flow". I've gone through this exercise a couple of times with some of my writers, and it's waaaay to disjointed. As mentioned, if you're writing a technical piece, or putting together a white paper or a brochure, then yes, you might be able to get away with it.

    If it's cost savings your looking for, chances are you are giving up a ton of quality in the process.
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  • Profile picture of the author BizBooks
    I use this sometimes for having people right the "general'" information around i niche i am focusing on. but many articles will end up being bland and repeat information that others have (after all, they are all using the same google search terms...) so its good for the first chapter or two of each specific topic, but not for the whole book.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      The method seems very similar to putting together a report/ebook from several PLR articles.

      Lets say you want to write an ebook about lawn care. There are many well-written PLR content available. I open up all the articles paste them into one document. Then I start splitting/slicing and I flush out a table of content from the artciles. Once I have them chaptered out I add more info, images, screenshots, etc. I can have an ebook ready in 24 hours or less doing that. If you don't re-write (which I would recommend you do) even sooner.

      But I agree the OP's plan is a good one. Fixing it so it flows/reads smoothly is part of the work you have to put into it. No matter how you slice it you still do need to put in some work. Either with PLR like I described above or meshing the custom work of five different writers so the final ebook flows nicely. If you don't you'll have a Frankenstein looking ebook. But I like the idea. For those who think it's too much work well anything worthwhile needs a little elbow grease put into it.
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    • Profile picture of the author theguyoverthere
      The following won't get you an ebook in 24 hours, but it's on point, so thought I would throw in a few ideas:

      1. Include sections with statistical and informational reports (charts and graphs). Not a lot of writing necessary, mostly summarizing and conclusions that are obvious from the charts. People love charts, graphs and statistics. (Want to know what 83% of successful books have in common?...)

      2. Not every section needs the same "voice" if you promote that the work is a collaboration of researchers and experts.

      3. Get an editor. There are lots around and they don't have to be expensive, because they don't have to write any of the content, only look it over and make changes.

      3. Get an editor who you can promote. If the editor has a respected name, or great credentials, people will be more likely to buy. "A PhD is connected to this ebook? Wow, must be good. Here's my $25."

      4. There is nothing wrong with having multiple authors and even promoting that fact. A book written by a team of researchers and writers can look more substantial (= higher value, = higher price) than one written by a single person. "Three college marketing profs are connected? Wow, must be good. Here's my $50."

      5. Don't produce crap. The second sale is 10x easier than the first, right? If you want your customers coming back, then make sure they get value.

      6. All the ideas that didn't make it into your ebook - newsletter. Yep, newsletters don't have to be very long (better if short!) just catch the attention and have a few good ideas (or even 1) and get the reader back to your store/site/whatever.

      Just a few thoughts.

      Hope they help.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ant West
    Hey mate thats a quality plan!

    Think i'm going to use that :p
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  • Profile picture of the author VegasGreg
    This method could (possibly) work if the book covered different small niches within a bigger niche. For example, an all inclusib=ve book on Internet Marketing. Then each chapter would be something different, like SEO, Article Marketing, Social Networking...etc. That way they wouldn't necessarily have to blend quite as well (within reason).

    I do use a similar technique for outsourcing my articles though. If I need 50 articles for one subject, I will usually break that down for 5-10 writers writing 5-10 articles each. That way they are completed faster and I get a different tone from each set. Sometimes 50 articles on the same subject is hard to accomplish from one mind.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Fullman
    Folks,

    This is exactly how newspapers are produced.

    Each journalist writes articles in their own style.

    Sub-Editors will then edit/rewrite the articles in the 'house' style.

    So, this method is viable...as long as the project owner has the required skill to take a mixed bag of written 'voices', and turn them into a consistent, singular flow of ideas.

    Gotta tell you though, it takes a lot of practice to make it work effectively. Or read naturally.

    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author coreytucker
      I have actually thought about doing something like this Hmm....now I just need a good writer I can trust. It can be a real pain creating your own product. But this is a very attractive way to do it to me. Thanks
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    • Profile picture of the author Jillian Slack
      Originally Posted by Steven Fullman View Post

      Folks,

      This is exactly how newspapers are produced.

      Each journalist writes articles in their own style.

      Sub-Editors will then edit/rewrite the articles in the 'house' style.

      So, this method is viable...as long as the project owner has the required skill to take a mixed bag of written 'voices', and turn them into a consistent, singular flow of ideas.

      Gotta tell you though, it takes a lot of practice to make it work effectively. Or read naturally.

      Steve

      Not exactly true.

      I work in the newspaper industry.

      A good journalist does not have his or her own style or voice. A good journalist gathers the facts and writes the stories WITHOUT being involved in the story, without letting their own views enter the story.

      The stories need to be as dry as possible and communicate the information.

      Writing a book is a different process than putting a newspaper together.

      Jill
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Fullman
        Originally Posted by Jillian Slack View Post

        Not exactly true.

        I work in the newspaper industry.
        Me, too, Jill! Have done for about a decade.


        Originally Posted by Jillian Slack View Post

        A good journalist does not have his or her own style or voice. A good journalist gathers the facts and writes the stories WITHOUT being involved in the story, without letting their own views enter the story.

        The stories need to be as dry as possible and communicate the information.

        Writing a book is a different process than putting a newspaper together.

        Jill
        It's not so much about involvement, or even emotion...more than...well everyone has their own unique syntax. Like a fingerprint.

        The best journalists are often the backbencher's who can turn someone else's 500 word story into a 20 word NIB without losing the meaning...or a 100 word outline into a fleshed out, credible story without a stated opinion.

        Like I said...it's a skill. And it's nice to see another newspaper type in here
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanman
    I didn't know this would actually produce so much debate here...But you see this method has been used by a lot of successful marketers to get an ebook up and running real fast.

    A lot of people say that it might not work as the writing style differs...I would say all that's needed here is good editing skills and letting the writer know exactly what you want them to write.

    If you tell them...Writing something on weight loss...Then they would write generalized stuff on weight loss. But when you tell them write 10 specific exercises to lose weight...Then that's what you get.

    This process can work very well as long as you specify what you are looking for in the right way.

    For all those saying this method won't be that beneficial...How about this?

    How long will it take you to write your own book? 2 weeks? A month? More?

    But what's the purpose of writing it? Ego satisfaction or money making? You see if you are looking to make fast money then this method sure will work...And a lot of big guru's out there use the same.

    But again...It varies from person to person. A lot will say it's worthless and reject it...And then there might be some who find it valuable and use it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hereandthere
    Seems to me that if you tell someone to write 10 specific exercises to lose weight, that will overlap and quite possibly contradict what you tell the other writers.

    I personally write my own stuff but have thought of hiring someone and would be happy enough to wait for one person to write me an ebook because there is always so much to do while I wait, on getting that site ready and on other sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rachel Goodchild
    I tihnk it's unwise. O've outsourced ot great writers to save me time before and still have to rewrite to get it in "my style" cohesively.
    It's better to invest time and do it right, right from the start.
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  • Profile picture of the author webgeek154
    here's a suggestion to overcome the different styles problem.

    once you're done with your initial plan of having multiple writers write different portions, choose the one you like best, hand them over the other chapters and have them teak those in their own style/words.

    Then you get a congruent book throughout and still very efficiently and inexpensively.

    i think the overlooked value that comes from this plan is split testing several writers to find the right one for you
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  • Profile picture of the author lacraiger
    nice plan but not 24 hours
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  • Profile picture of the author webgeek154
    i wouldn't impose a a 24 hour limit on something like that. no point to that other than bragging rights.

    the objective (i assume) is to easily and efficiently create a high quality product, right?
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