PayPal SCAM! Attention Warriors!

37 replies
Hey Warriors!
I just received an email from 'member@payple.com' , pretending to be representing PayPal and sending me a link to follow and log in to PayPal with in order to clarify what the 'unusual activity' on my account was!
Obviously it is a Scam, don't fall for it!

Art
#attention #paypal #scam #warriors
  • Profile picture of the author elasticbuffoon
    When I looked at the message, I would not be treating it seriously.

    The word 'customer' is already mispelled. Also the heading 'Will be closed Your Account...". I spotted syntax error. Another thing is the return path or where it was from (member@payple.com).

    This kind of email is not the first time I've seen. Thanks for the warning.

    G
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Originally Posted by elasticbuffoon View Post

      The word 'customer' is already mispelled. Also the heading 'Will be closed Your Account...". I spotted syntax error. Another thing is the return path or where it was from (member@payple.com).
      This is easy to say if English is your first language, or if you're familiar enough with it to spot the problems. For a lot of Paypal customers, that isn't the case. The syntax errors could easily be missed.


      Paul
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      • Profile picture of the author Olen
        Good rule of thumb is what Paul was saying above. I make it a habit to never click on anything from a money site in an email no matter who sends it or how official it looks.
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  • Profile picture of the author ejohnny39
    thank you for this great info
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  • Profile picture of the author Amazing Dave
    I mean no offense to anyone, BUT, if someone has actually fallen for this trick, they should stop using the Internet right now. If you just take a 2 second look at that email, you clearly see it's completely FAKE.

    Thanks for the heads-up anyway!

    ~ Dave
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      First off, Paypal will ALWAYS include the name on your account in the salutation. If it says "Dear customer," or anything like that, it's 100% fake.

      Having the account name in the salutation doesn't guarantee it's legit, but if it's missing, just delete the email.

      Never log in from a link in an email. When you log in to Paypal (or any similar service) always type the URL in or go from a bookmark. And make sure you use the https log-in link.

      If there really is an issue with an account, there will be a note within the account page that will bring it to your attention.


      Paul
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  • Probably from Nigeria or Ghana? Clearly a scam due to the bad spelling and not mentioning your name?
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  • Thanks for the heads up. Always good to be reminded of these things!

    Michael
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    • Profile picture of the author Teravel
      Originally Posted by Amazing Dave View Post

      I mean no offense to anyone, BUT, if someone has actually fallen for this trick, they should stop using the Internet right now. If you just take a 2 second look at that email, you clearly see it's completely FAKE.

      Thanks for the heads-up anyway!

      ~ Dave
      I think you give humanity far to much credit. Most people see "Your account will be closed" and they click through without a thought. This is why threads like this are created, to show what the actual scams look like.

      Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

      First off, Paypal will ALWAYS include the name on your account in the salutation. If it says "Dear customer," or anything like that, it's 100% fake.

      Having the account name in the salutation doesn't guarantee it's legit, but if it's missing, just delete the email.

      Never log in from a link in an email. When you log in to Paypal (or any similar service) always type the URL in or go from a bookmark. And make sure you use the https log-in link.

      If there really is an issue with an account, there will be a note within the account page that will bring it to your attention.


      Paul
      100% True, and I want to add that their emails will ALWAYS come from the Paypal.com domain.


      This type of scam is known as Phishing, where the sender is attempting to gain personal information for malicious reasons.

      I suggest you report the senders email by visiting Incident Reporting System | US-CERT , though this service may be down like the governments DNC services.
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      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
        Originally Posted by Teravel View Post

        I suggest you report the senders email by visiting Incident Reporting System | US-CERT , though this service may be down like the governments DNC services.
        That task would be an incredible burden to bear since emails are either fake or belonging to hijacked domains and as mentioned, they flow as regular as clockwork.
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  • Profile picture of the author mgsmith
    Though the email can be easily marked as scam due to its misspelled word, doubtful email address and subject, there are others who don't pay attention that much to details and of course this is still a great reminder for them to check the email very carefully. Thank you for posting this!
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    Mike

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  • Profile picture of the author OnlineAddict
    You must be new on internet, because these emails come on a regular basis, different templates and tricks, but they have been here since paypal exists.
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    From1toMillion.com

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  • Profile picture of the author awledd
    I entered fake password and it received it - logged in etc... some 4 yrs ago.
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  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    How could this message pass the spam filter? I have received numerous similar messages, but they go directly to the spam folder.

    When I was a newbie I used to forward them to Paypal… but later I stopped wasting time with this matter.





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  • Profile picture of the author rmolina88
    I've been getting these fake emails for YEARS and they're always sent to my trash.

    Although I'm surprised how many people legitimately fall for them...
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  • Profile picture of the author nadal619
    I have received a lot of those emails , they try to scare you by saying that your account is closing , but always looks up at the sender email and you will find it is not from Paypal.

    Thanks Art for sharing this with everyone
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  • Profile picture of the author Magicpollux
    Thank you to let us know. If you receive an email addressed to "Dear Paypal member" or some formulation like that be awarded. A real Paypal communication will address his email with your real name.
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  • Profile picture of the author RobLevin
    A general rule of thumb, is that Paypal says is that it is a fake e-mail if your real name isn't used

    Dear John = Real
    Dear Customer = Fake
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Rob,
      A general rule of thumb, is that Paypal says is that it is a fake e-mail if your real name isn't used

      Dear John = Real
      Dear Customer = Fake
      That is VERY bad advice. I have received fake Paypal emails that used my name in the salutation.

      The surest way to avoid problems from these is to only log in to Paypal using this URL:
      Code:
      https://www.paypal.com
      Always use the best anti-spam systems you can get. Keep your anti-virus and security software up to date. And, even with that, never log in from a link in an email. Even then, you're not 100% protected, but it would reduce the odds of getting successfully phished by a LOT.


      Paul
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      • Profile picture of the author datingworld
        Originally Posted by RobLevin View Post

        A general rule of thumb, is that Paypal says is that it is a fake e-mail if your real name isn't used

        Dear John = Real
        Dear Customer = Fake
        Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

        Rob,That is VERY bad advice. I have received fake Paypal emails that used my name in the salutation.

        The surest way to avoid problems from these is to only log in to Paypal using this URL:
        Code:
        https://www.paypal.com
        Always use the best anti-spam systems you can get. Keep your anti-virus and security software up to date. And, even with that, never log in from a link in an email. Even then, you're not 100% protected, but it would reduce the odds of getting successfully phished by a LOT.


        Paul

        I have seen fake emails coming from bank with my full name in salutation... the best way is said by Paul is to open a new browser and type in the URL there yourself rather than clicking on the link provided in the email...

        The best advice I can say is that whenever you receive any email from bank, paypal or any thing like such and even if it is 100% real and genuine email, Still Do not click on the link provided in the email. Always open new browser and type the URL yourself. Make it a habit and you will be safe from lots of unseen troubles.
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  • Profile picture of the author SocialSEOs
    Thanks for alerting us about this scam. These scammers are getting more & more clever each day. That email had a lot of red flags in it that people with a trained eye could easily catch. But for those who are naive to this type of phishing, they really better wisen up or get GOT!
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim3
    Help the world by reporting these emails to Paypal.

    The address is spoof@paypal.com

    They will not reply to you, but you can bet they will take action on them.

    Send them the original message but most importantly the email header,
    if you don't know how to find the header for your email,
    a quick Bing search of 'how to find email headers for [add your email client]
    will give you the info
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  • Profile picture of the author alfred1982
    Thanks for sharing!
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    For your solo advertising needs, click here.

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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    The best idea, as others have said, NEVER click a link if it is related to anything financial. If it's supposedly from Paypal or your bank, log in the correct way and if there really IS a problem, you will see it. There are so many fake Paypal emails that they're easy to spot. Even if you don't spot them, just don't click the links or log in anywhere except from the correct url.
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  • Profile picture of the author ElijahM
    I get these types of emails all the time. Some of them are more "realistic" than others. Some are pretty darn good. They state that my account has been suspended, that there is unusual activity, etc. I always mouse over the link without clicking on it to check the URL.
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    • Profile picture of the author Cali16
      Per PayPal's site, the best thing to do with these phishing emails is to immediately forward them to "spoof@paypal.com".
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      If you don't face your fears, the only thing you'll ever see is what's in your comfort zone. ~Anne McClain, astronaut
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  • Profile picture of the author timpears
    Unbelievable as it may seem, some folks fall for this type of scam. I feel aorry for them as scumb like this should never be allowed to succeed and cheat these people. But it happens, and so it continues.

    PayPal told me some years ago that they had 200 people in their fraud department to deal with stuf like this. I had someone break into my account and steal $7,000 out of my bank account. I got it back eventually, but it was a real hassle.
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    Tim Pears

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  • Maybe someone should make a Facebook SCAM! Attention Warriors! thread. As I get a few fake notifications from "facebook"
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  • Profile picture of the author xpesos
    lately i have been getting plenty of them, they even have named their email account as "member@paypal.com" so when you check out their email that will come out to be slightly different from the real one
    Crazy thing, well i think a lot of people would be falling to them
    Originally Posted by artflair View Post

    Hey Warriors!
    I just received an email from 'member@payple.com' , pretending to be representing PayPal and sending me a link to follow and log in to PayPal with in order to clarify what the 'unusual activity' on my account was!
    Obviously it is a Scam, don't fall for it!

    Art
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  • Profile picture of the author leadmonster
    Thanks for the FYI!
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  • Profile picture of the author fred67
    I absolutely 'never' reply to anything official through E-mail links - I can't believe people still do that.
    If you are associated with the product/service concerned simply log in to that service from your usual source (favourites etc) as if there are any notifications to worry about they will be flagged up after login
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  • Profile picture of the author jessiem
    I've received those kind of emails from Paypal, I only reply (if necessary) if they have my name spelled correctly on the salutation part.
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  • Profile picture of the author Adie
    The domain says it all. Beginners are always the victims..
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Maggs
    I always turn on the headers in my email program so a quick glance will reveal the original source, it's pretty easy to detect this way.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stefan Shields
    That email is littered with mistakes and giveaway signs.

    A small percentage of people could still be in danger with that though.
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