Emails per product in your autoresponder

10 replies
Hey fellow Warriors,

I was just curious how many emails you are using to promote affiliate offers in your autoresponder. For example of someone optins and is shown a OTO (first affiliate offer), how many autoresponder emails do you have promoting that first offer before you move on to another. I've heard several answers (I know there is no cookie cutter answer), I'm just curious what other people are doing. Thanks everyone for your insight.
#autoresponder #emails #product
  • Profile picture of the author NatesMarketing
    As you said, there is no cookie cutter answer.

    But, for an idea. I promote a few products via an autoresponder - they all pertain to the same niche; however, different aspects.

    I personally have it setup in the fitness niche, but I'll try and relate it to IM.

    For example; I wouldn't sell pop-up domination and then market pippity. They're basically the "same" product. But, I would also recommend premium wordpress themes, or plugins that add value to that niche.

    Hopefully that makes some sense.

    As for how frequently - I have mine in a rotation. So like, popup domination. Then, the power of popup domination with this theme = super results. Then there's this other great plugin that accomplishes this. Then, remember that plugin? -> it goes great with the theme I sent previously! Etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mack
    Definitely don't go for the "one and done" approach. Ever heard of the Rule of Seven?

    Now I'm not saying to send the same offer seven times, but don't be discouraged if the first email doesn't convert very well. People just need to get warmed up to it.

    Take advantage of subtle cross-promotions like Nate above me has mentioned.

    And a side note: make sure to exclude the buyers on your list in your next emails promoting the same product they bought.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      People love stories, and most good stories have a rhythm to them. Next time you read a good novel or watch your favorite series on TV, watch for this pattern:

      Objective

      Conflict

      Resolution

      The pattern repeats itself again and again, episode after episode. There may be a bit of a "palate cleanser" in between, but the pattern starts right back up again.

      You can use this in your autoresponder series, too.

      After your intro email, call it email 0, email 1 starts painting a picture of something the subscriber desires, why it's desirable, and so on. Email 2 tells the "conflict" part - why the subscriber doesn't have what they want and why they are having trouble getting it. End with a cliffhanger suggesting that there's a solution. Email 3 lays out the solution. Ideally, it's something the subscriber can do for themselves, with time, effort and skill. Or they can save time and effort and leverage someone else's skill by buying Product X, which you recommend. Explain why you recommend it, what they can expect, etc.

      Next comes a palate cleanser - maybe a funny, but related story, or a link to a free resource. Maybe it's a good place for that email swap you set up with another marketer. Just something to let the subscriber take a breather.

      Then you start up the next OCR cycle.

      You can keep this going for years in some markets.
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      • Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        People love stories, and most good stories have a rhythm to them. Next time you read a good novel or watch your favorite series on TV, watch for this pattern:

        Objective

        Conflict

        Resolution

        The pattern repeats itself again and again, episode after episode. There may be a bit of a "palate cleanser" in between, but the pattern starts right back up again.

        You can use this in your autoresponder series, too.

        After your intro email, call it email 0, email 1 starts painting a picture of something the subscriber desires, why it's desirable, and so on. Email 2 tells the "conflict" part - why the subscriber doesn't have what they want and why they are having trouble getting it. End with a cliffhanger suggesting that there's a solution. Email 3 lays out the solution. Ideally, it's something the subscriber can do for themselves, with time, effort and skill. Or they can save time and effort and leverage someone else's skill by buying Product X, which you recommend. Explain why you recommend it, what they can expect, etc.

        Next comes a palate cleanser - maybe a funny, but related story, or a link to a free resource. Maybe it's a good place for that email swap you set up with another marketer. Just something to let the subscriber take a breather.

        Then you start up the next OCR cycle.

        You can keep this going for years in some markets.
        Love this!
        Signature

        Sophie Choung
        Solo Ad Queen

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      • Profile picture of the author Joel_Cowen
        That's awesome advice John, so what you're saying is something like this?

        Product 1:
        - Email0 - Objective
        - Email1 - Conflict
        - Email2 - Resolution
        Product 2:
        - Email0 - Objective
        - Email1 - Conflict
        - Email2 - Resolution

        .
        .
        .

        and so on?

        Thanks everyone.
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          You've got the idea, Joel. One thing I do is break the rhythm occasionally with other posts - links to cool but related videos, answering reader questions, quick polls, and so on. Even your favorite comedy breaks up the season with a schmaltzy "very special episode" once in a while. Dramas will inject a bit of humor.

          But the bread and butter comes from that OCR cycle. Also, don't be afraid to revisit popular products from time to time. People have demonstrated that they will watch the same TV episodes over and over - it's the only thing sustaining most of the cable channels out there. If you have a 12-month cycle, don't be afraid to put your best product in there 2 or 3 times during the year. Call it a "best of" or an "encore presentation" or whatever.

          If you write your series the right way, people won't know it's an autoresponder, so they'll accept that you need breaks and that you're bringing them popular content in case anyone missed it the first time.

          To paraphrase one TV network, if you don't remember it, it's new to you...
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          You've got the idea, Joel. One thing I do is break the rhythm occasionally with other posts - links to cool but related videos, answering reader questions, quick polls, and so on. Even your favorite comedy breaks up the season with a schmaltzy "very special episode" once in a while. Dramas will inject a bit of humor.

          But the bread and butter comes from that OCR cycle. Also, don't be afraid to revisit popular products from time to time. People have demonstrated that they will watch the same TV episodes over and over - it's the only thing sustaining most of the cable channels out there. If you have a 12-month cycle, don't be afraid to put your best product in there 2 or 3 times during the year. Call it a "best of" or an "encore presentation" or whatever.

          If you write your series the right way, people won't know it's an autoresponder, so they'll accept that you need breaks and that you're bringing them popular content in case anyone missed it the first time.

          To paraphrase one TV network, if you don't remember it, it's new to you...
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Depending on how expensive the product is the rule if thumb
    is that you need 7-10 emails to get the sale-10 being for the
    more expensive purchases. Here is a template that has worked
    like gangbusters for my clients and my own business:

    Letter 1 – Thank you for sending for the report /more information, here’s the link.

    Letter 2 – Hope you got the report; here are some reasons why you’ll want my product.

    Letter 3 – Here are some questions people are ASKING about my product. (FAQ)

    Letter 4 – Here are what people are SAYING about my product. (Testimonials.)

    Letter 5 – Here are some of the strongest BENEFITS to getting my product. (Limited Offer)

    Letter 6 – Time is running out on the special BONUS. How I beat the competition.

    Letter 7 – What’s keeping you back from ordering? Knock down objections.

    Letter 8 – Other people who ordered are already enjoying the benefits, don’t lose out.

    Letter 9 – Here’s a LIMITED offer—price reduction, sneak preview, secret link etc.

    Letter 10 – Frankly I’m puzzled that you haven’t ordered yet. Final hard sell.


    -Ray Edwards
    Signature
    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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    • Profile picture of the author radhika
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      Depending on how expensive the product is the rule if thumb
      is that you need 7-10 emails to get the sale-10 being for the
      more expensive purchases. Here is a template that has worked
      like gangbusters for my clients and my own business:

      Letter 1 - Thank you for sending for the report /more information, here's the link.

      Letter 2 - Hope you got the report; here are some reasons why you'll want my product.

      Letter 3 - Here are some questions people are ASKING about my product. (FAQ)

      Letter 4 - Here are what people are SAYING about my product. (Testimonials.)

      Letter 5 - Here are some of the strongest BENEFITS to getting my product. (Limited Offer)

      Letter 6 - Time is running out on the special BONUS. How I beat the competition.

      Letter 7 - What's keeping you back from ordering? Knock down objections.

      Letter 8 - Other people who ordered are already enjoying the benefits, don't lose out.

      Letter 9 - Here's a LIMITED offer--price reduction, sneak preview, secret link etc.

      Letter 10 - Frankly I'm puzzled that you haven't ordered yet. Final hard sell.


      -Ray Edwards
      Are you divided into your sales page into an email series?

      Ecourses should be more of information, problem solving and benefits. Not looking like sales pages.

      .
      Signature
      Follow up Autoresponder PRO :: 33% Discount!!
      FREE Upgrades! IMPROVED Email Deliverability!!
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      • Profile picture of the author Raydal
        Originally Posted by radhika View Post

        Are you divided into your sales page into an email series?

        Ecourses should be more of information, problem solving and benefits. Not looking like sales pages.

        .
        This is not an ecourse. It is a selling series.

        -Ray Edwards
        Signature
        The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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