Should I Tell The Price Up Front?

29 replies
Should I put the price of a $1500-5000 service on the landing page of a website?

Would something like "priced from $1500" be a help or a hinderance to getting potential buyers into the funnel?

The service does require personal contact, so stating the price up front could weed out non-buyers so I won't have to waste time trying to sell to them.

This is my first go selling at this price point, so I'm just making guesses!

Thanks for the help.

And, Happy Holidays!
#price #up front
  • Profile picture of the author John J M
    Generally speaking, no. While you may want to weed out non-buyers, it's better to bring people through some kind of funnel that builds trust (such as email follow up messages). As you build trust, you separate non-buyers from people who are willing to buy at a low price point (for affiliate sales) from people willing to buy your product at a high price point.
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    • Profile picture of the author mwright
      Originally Posted by John J Rivers View Post

      Generally speaking, no. While you may want to weed out non-buyers, it's better to bring people through some kind of funnel that builds trust (such as email follow up messages). As you build trust, you separate non-buyers from people who are willing to buy at a low price point (for affiliate sales) from people willing to buy your product at a high price point.
      I also considered that just because a person doesn't buy now, doesn't mean they won't in the future, or be a referral source. Maybe it's better to have the contact than not.
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  • Profile picture of the author BradVert2013
    When I was doing freelance writing and was actively seeking out clients, I never gave prices out upfront. I always said to contact me for a free estimate.

    The problem with phrases like "Priced from $1500" is that many people will expect, or assume, they'll be paying close to $1500. They'll put you on the defensive so you're suddenly trying to explain why they're paying more. Not a good position to be in. I experienced this many times when I was just starting out. Same with price ranges, like "Prices range from $1500-3000). Potential clients will get mad if you quote them anything much higher than your lowest price.

    In the end I found it's much better to do a price quote after talking to them and finding out what exactly they want.
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  • Profile picture of the author mwright
    Thanks for the replies so far.

    Ironically, I stumbled upon someone with a similar (compatible) product, charging almost exactly what I'm charging, and his website simply gave examples of his work, a personal bio, and a contact number. I had to call to get the price.

    So, that strategy does work, and I'm gonna hire this guy for a project or two!
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  • Profile picture of the author OnlineAddict
    Every time I see a website with no pricing on it, I close it immediately. I would never email a company to ask for pricing, its their job, no matter if they sell a $1 product or a $1mil product. There is so many competitors in every niche, that its just their loss, because I can find the same service/product somewhere else within 30 seconds.
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    • Originally Posted by OnlineAddict View Post

      Every time I see a website with no pricing on it, I close it immediately. I would never email a company to ask for pricing, its their job, no matter if they sell a $1 product or a $1mil product. There is so many competitors in every niche, that its just their loss, because I can find the same service/product somewhere else within 30 seconds.
      Speaking as a consumer, not necessarily as a marketer, it puts me off when a vendor doesn't clearly disclose the price upfront, and rarely I call in to get a quote.
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      • Profile picture of the author mwright
        Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

        Speaking as a consumer, not necessarily as a marketer, it puts me off when a vendor doesn't clearly disclose the price upfront, and rarely I call in to get a quote.
        I feel the same. And, in the case I described earlier, the vendor's presentation was so compelling for me specifically, I was willing to call, get prices, and offer them a job.
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    • Profile picture of the author mwright
      Originally Posted by OnlineAddict View Post

      Every time I see a website with no pricing on it, I close it immediately. I would never email a company to ask for pricing, its their job, no matter if they sell a $1 product or a $1mil product. There is so many competitors in every niche, that its just their loss, because I can find the same service/product somewhere else within 30 seconds.
      Actually, in the time I've been developing this service I've found only one competitor, and their product/service is kinda weak. That's why I'm charging what I'm charging.

      But, yeah, I tend to move on too if I don't see the price because that seems to be my selling point. That's one reason we use squeeze pages; to separate people who will go elsewhere from people who are willing to go further into our funnel.
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    • Profile picture of the author BradVert2013
      Originally Posted by OnlineAddict View Post

      Every time I see a website with no pricing on it, I close it immediately. I would never email a company to ask for pricing, its their job, no matter if they sell a $1 product or a $1mil product. There is so many competitors in every niche, that its just their loss, because I can find the same service/product somewhere else within 30 seconds.

      Problem with that is, especially in the freelance arena, prices can range wildly based on a client's specific requirements and scope of the project. I've been screwed over too many times in the past when I did freelance writing to know that a one-price-fits-all works.

      There are plenty of potential clients out there who'd rather discuss their needs first, and then get a customized quote that fits the scope of their project.
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    • Profile picture of the author Goffs Concepts
      Originally Posted by OnlineAddict View Post

      Every time I see a website with no pricing on it, I close it immediately. I would never email a company to ask for pricing, its their job, no matter if they sell a $1 product or a $1mil product. There is so many competitors in every niche, that its just their loss, because I can find the same service/product somewhere else within 30 seconds.
      I agree. The price is in the top three things that I look at first.
      Good luck
      John
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      • Profile picture of the author quadagon
        Wow what a valuable contribution to a thread that hadn't been touched in over 20 months
        Originally Posted by Goffs Concepts View Post

        I agree. The price is in the top three things that I look at first.
        Good luck
        John
        You given me a lot to think about
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Heck no. Don't over-complicate the selling process. People will buy at their own pace - regardless of price. Just make your sales page describe your offer in a way that makes it seem incredibly valuable, and people will buy your product.
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    • Profile picture of the author BradVert2013
      Originally Posted by Randall Magwood View Post

      Heck no. Don't over-complicate the selling process. People will buy at their own pace - regardless of price. Just make your sales page describe your offer in a way that makes it seem incredibly valuable, and people will buy your product.
      Very true! A well written sales page can bring in clients regardless if the price is given up front or if a customized quote is needed.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Originally Posted by mwright View Post

    Should I put the price of a $1500-5000 service on the landing page of a website?

    Would something like "priced from $1500" be a help or a hinderance to getting potential buyers into the funnel?

    The service does require personal contact, so stating the price up front could weed out non-buyers so I won't have to waste time trying to sell to them.

    This is my first go selling at this price point, so I'm just making guesses!

    Thanks for the help.

    And, Happy Holidays!
    I'm a price up front kind of guy. I have 10 price points broken out into packages. I have all my services priced out individually. Anything that is based on volume, I price like 10, 20 and 50 ( SEO as an example 10 page site 20 and 50 )

    As discussed most buyers on the internet are used to seeing the price, and not having the price usually ends up in no contact.

    It sounds like you are doubting the price point... OWN IT! you deserve it! and you are still worth more than you are asking!
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    • Profile picture of the author mwright
      Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

      I'm a price up front kind of guy. I have 10 price points broken out into packages. I have all my services priced out individually. Anything that is based on volume, I price like 10, 20 and 50 ( SEO as an example 10 page site 20 and 50 )

      As discussed most buyers on the internet are used to seeing the price, and not having the price usually ends up in no contact.

      It sounds like you are doubting the price point... OWN IT! you deserve it! and you are still worth more than you are asking!
      I actually do have distinct packages with distinct prices. For the buyers, I think it's a matter of seeing the price in the right context. That's what salespages are for anyway.

      btw - I'm absolutely fine with what I charge because it's based on a real world value.

      I COULD multiply the price by 10 and make it a true luxury item. But, I'd have to find more Unicorn's blood. Just kidding.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by mwright View Post

    Should I put the price of a $1500-5000 service on the landing page of a website?

    Would something like "priced from $1500" be a help or a hinderance to getting potential buyers into the funnel?

    The service does require personal contact, so stating the price up front could weed out non-buyers so I won't have to waste time trying to sell to them.

    This is my first go selling at this price point, so I'm just making guesses!

    Thanks for the help.

    And, Happy Holidays!
    I wouldn't say "Priced from $1,500" because then they will be stuck on that price.
    But I like to give my price up front, before they call me. My price is on my FAQ page, so that there is some building of value before they see the price.

    But I would rather them have an idea of the cost before they call, because you can waste a lot of time with someone who eventually says "I think you're the guy for this. I've got $3300, what can you do for me?"

    I would put "We have packages from $1,500 to $5,000". But then explain some of the benefits they get. Just giving a price tells them nothing.

    To me, the more they know before they call, the better. But I don't put them in a marketing funnel before I talk to them. They just call, or ask for a consultation....which is to determine if my service is a fit for them or not.
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    • Profile picture of the author mwright
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      To me, the more they know before they call, the better. But I don't put them in a marketing funnel before I talk to them. They just call, or ask for a consultation....which is to determine if my service is a fit for them or not.
      Thank you, Claude!

      The nature of my service/product requires a consultation and a close. That's why I wanted to hear from you... specifically. I wanted to model the thought process of someone who's actually going to close a deal.

      So, in this case, I think the primary goal of the site is to get people on the phone. In the process, people need to be educated, including getting SOME idea of the price, so they will be easier to close.

      At least that's what I think.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Davis
    As a few others mentioned above, when I am seeking to buy a Service or Product, if no price is displayed, I close the site and move on.

    I don't have time to waste calling/emailing someone to find out about prices.

    I value my time, and also the time of others.
    In all of my websites where I provide a Service or Product, I clearly display the price, to make things easier and quicker for both the buyer and seller.
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    • Profile picture of the author BillyPilgrim
      We have to keep our marketer hats on and not our consumer hats. I never, NEVER, click Google ads. But I made a good chunk of Adsense change from folks who did.
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  • Profile picture of the author Networking_now
    Price upfront? I wonder what Frank Kern does for his consulting
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    • Profile picture of the author mwright
      Originally Posted by Networking_now View Post

      Price upfront? I wonder what Frank Kern does for his consulting
      Actually, Frank said he'd pay ME... but, he didn't say it upfront.
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  • Profile picture of the author solartime
    Not sure exactly what you're selling. The answer would be based upon (so what are you trying to sell). Normally if I'm buying a product I want to know how much it cost without a bunch of phone tag and going around in circles trying to get a straight answer. It can start to feel a little scam-ish and frustrating when there's lots for sale but no prices to go with them. If a person feels they don't want it or can't afford it then don't waste their time or yours.

    That being said, sometimes when a services are being sold as opposed to tangible items and they come with a somewhat costly tag, then a prospect will many times need to be led (in stages) into paying what might be considered to be high prices. At that point then it might be better not to mention the price until after the prospect 'for lack of a better term' has been buttered up first. With your sales letters, techniques, pitch, etc. Before trying to lay anything close to a 5000 dollar price tag on them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Miranda
    I would agree with someone above.. if there is no pricing at all on a sales page I will skip it. With that said, if I was REALLY interested in what they were offering I would inquire.
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    • Profile picture of the author mwright
      Originally Posted by Steven Miranda View Post

      I would agree with someone above.. if there is no pricing at all on a sales page I will skip it. With that said, if I was REALLY interested in what they were offering I would inquire.
      Originally Posted by Sarevok View Post

      I'll say no.

      Here's my logic:

      Some people stick around JUST TO SEE the price.

      So, statistically, you want as many people to stick around as possible, because it gives you more time to convince your prospect to buy.

      Just my $.02, there's more than one way to cut this cake.

      I agree.

      The beauty of well-written sales page is that it is designed to filter out all but the most motivated buyers, whatever their motivation. Each next step a visitor is willing to take makes them a more likely buyer.

      Steven, I just hired someone for a $2500 job because even though he had no prices on his website, his features and benefits were exactly what I was looking for. I sent an email, he sent me the prices... done!

      My original question was to determine whether or not I would display my prices on a landing page; like Old Navy sometimes does. Now, I know I'm gonna put at least a price range on the site, just not on the landing page.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sarevok
    I'll say no.

    Here's my logic:

    Some people stick around JUST TO SEE the price.

    So, statistically, you want as many people to stick around as possible, because it gives you more time to convince your prospect to buy.

    Just my $.02, there's more than one way to cut this cake.
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Lessard
    For me the decision is based on what I am selling and how many sales I want. It has been a very rare instance for me to have a situation when I was not sure if price upfront was best or not. In that case I reverted to what any good marketer would do. I split test.

    What I am selling can be a big factor. If I am selling a package that is easily defined and something I want to do volume on and my price is very competitive then I would be crazy not to make the price extremely visible.

    On the other end of the spectrum would be what I refer to as prime clients that hire me as a consultant as their virtual marketing director. These deals are extremely customized and can be very complex involving all types of incentives and I only accept deals that are a perfect fit for all concerned. Since I get decent demand for my services and need to eliminate those that are not serious I just put a minimum qualifier to weed out time wasters such as minimum 10k retainer etc..
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    @mwright: Everyone who says they'd skip the site if no pricing were on it, are not your clients. Just as one shouldn't price their services according to what they personally feel they'd pay but price according to the market they wish to do business with, one shouldn't decide if prices should be displayed according to their personal buying habits but that of their desired market.

    And contrary to casual belief, by NOT showing pricing on your site, you actually spook away price sensitive shoppers. Here's why:

    It's because they imagine you must be high priced - and they don't want to go there. Even though they don't know your price. They merely imagine it to be high. And "high price" is relative so it's a number that's only high to them... and exists only in their mind. Yet that's all it takes to make them turn away.

    Think about that.

    Compare it to others who shop value. Who shop results. If you interest them, even without knowing price, they check you out. They take a few seconds, fill out a form and submit it. Their interest in getting the service is somewhat stronger than their interest in how much it's going to cost them.
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  • Profile picture of the author BlairDesigns
    It has to be your preference, how about split testing to see which works out best? No one way will work for everyone and like others have said some will be turned off by not having the price slap them in the face and others will be curious enough to find out more.

    It's a fact of life dealing with tire-kickers, but if you're offer is one of pure genius you won't even notice them because you'll be too busy banking on the ones who aren't!
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    The rule of thumb is the higher the price the more you hide it.
    And this makes sense, because you want people to see value
    BEFORE they decide on what they are willing to pay.

    And what we like and don't like as marketers has NOTHING
    to do with what works.


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