Content Writing - Am I Paying Too Much?

70 replies
Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

Thanks guys
#content #paying #writing
  • Profile picture of the author 4DayWeekend
    If the $75 article is bringing you a great ROI then it's not too much. At the end of the day, it's all about the returns rather than the costs.

    However, I'm sure you could get a flawless article writer for less than that.

    The $2 is definitely too cheap though.
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    • Profile picture of the author shadeofinfo
      Originally Posted by 4DayWeekend View Post

      If the $75 article is bringing you a great ROI then it's not too much. At the end of the day, it's all about the returns rather than the costs.

      However, I'm sure you could get a flawless article writer for less than that.

      The $2 is definitely too cheap though.
      I agree with this. If the articles that you're paying $75 for does bring you a great return, and you're overly satisfied with the quality, then it's worth it.

      In a sense, you do get what you pay for it's so hard to judge these things these days. One person charging $10 an article could write the greatest content you've ever come across while the person charging $75 an article or higher may not be that good.

      I wouldn't pay that high for someone however unless I was sure that my ROI from paying for that article was going to be high.
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    • Profile picture of the author Raihan12
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    I wouldn't call anything less than 800 words an article. A blog post maybe. To me most real articles start at a minimum of 800 words and can run as high as 5000 or more. Just sayin'

    It's hard to answer your question without seeing some of the work. $75 for 700 words is a fair price if the article is:

    compelling
    informative
    engaging
    entertaining

    Does the reader want to finish reading? Do they come away feeling like they've gotten something of value? Do they want to sign up for more info? Do they want to come back to your site?

    These things are what determines if your writer is worth the money. If you're getting results like this, you're probably okay. Good luck.
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    • Good responses from the others. $75 is not too much, no, if you can clearly see time, effort and a good result. $2, though, wow that is nothing. Even a good writer is going to take a couple of hours to come up with 700 words of engaging copy, so you were paying someone $16 a day...

      If the articles are helping the business, then they're the right price.

      And forget grammatically correct (see what I did there, started a sentence with and). Copywriting for the web especially is different. I have been a print journalist for 15 years and you have to do it differently, with shorter sentences, fragments etc.

      So a lot of those rules are just gone.
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      • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
        Remember too, the article is also only worth as much as you do with it. If you don't use it to its full potential, it's worth very little to you. The more you promote it, the higher its value to you.
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      • Profile picture of the author Marketer Matt
        Thanks for the responses so far everyone. I appreciate it.

        I'd definitely agree that the ROI is what makes the article ultimately worth it, but, I had a bad experience with paying a guy $30-$40 a review several months ago. Apparently, he didn't think it was enough for the 700-1000 word articles I was asking for and he ended up not fulfilling the contract.

        I decided to up the ante this time around and go for $75 for the same thing. So far so good, and if the articles produce like they did before, it's worth it to me.

        That being said though... I'm not a fan of overpaying for something if I can help it which is what spurred the question. So any other thoughts you guys have are welcome.

        Originally Posted by CovertCopywriting View Post

        And forget grammatically correct (see what I did there, started a sentence with and). Copywriting for the web especially is different. I have been a print journalist for 15 years and you have to do it differently, with shorter sentences, fragments etc.

        So a lot of those rules are just gone.
        I definitely agree with you on this... by "grammatical correctness" I meant that it sounded like a native English speaker and wasn't "choppy." Informal is fine, but I've dealt with some authors who simply didn't have a great grasp of Enlglish.
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  • Profile picture of the author NicoleBeckett
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have a feeling that you're asking this question because you already have a gut feeling about the answer If the $75 article was bringing you a bunch of new traffic, lots of exposure, etc, you'd probably think it was well worth the expense. If the article was chock full of solid information and written so masterfully that it compelled you to gobble up every single word, you probably wouldn't bat an eyelash at spending the $75 again.

    Just because a writer charges alot doesn't necessarily mean he's worth it. You have to look at his experience and his work to figure out if he's really worth what he's asking for.

    I'm a little concerned that you're simply asking for a "grammatically correct article", though. Sure, good grammar is important, but it's not the ONLY thing that goes into a great article. If your $75 article is simply grammatically correct -- and doesn't offer much else -- then, yes, you overpaid.
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
    That's too much. Plus, you're asking for too little. GRAMMATICAL CORRECTNESS is just a starting point. The keys to a great review are INFORMATION QUALITY and USER ENGAGEMENT. You can get a well-written 300 to 500 word review for $3.50 to $8. For a 700 - 1200 word review, you can get it for $10 to $15. No need to pay $75. There are sooooooooooo many Americans with college degrees out of work nowadays that paying $75 per article is just insaaaaaaaaaaane.

    IMHO
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  • Profile picture of the author webmonopoly
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
    It depends on the ROI you make from that single article, how much money will that article make you? If your search hard you can get high quality writing at a great budget.
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  • Profile picture of the author RyanLB
    I think you are paying a decent amount for quality work. Sure, it's higher than you will find on the forums, but you are going to get a much higher quality as a result. ROI of course needs to be the determining factor. For the price you are paying, your freelancer should be working with you - not only hearing what you are looking for, but also giving advice. For those prices you should be receiving some consulting.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarketingBees
    It's a case of you get what you pay for. If you're used to paying $5 for 500 words then you'll think you're getting a fair deal and the content is fine. But if you were to put it next to a $50 article of 500 words you'd notice the huge difference between the 2.

    I've paid $5 for 500 words, I've paid $20 and I've paid $200!
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    • Profile picture of the author vandernath
      Originally Posted by MarketingBees View Post

      It's a case of you get what you pay for. If you're used to paying $5 for 500 words then you'll think you're getting a fair deal and the content is fine. But if you were to put it next to a $50 article of 500 words you'd notice the huge difference between the 2.

      I've paid $5 for 500 words, I've paid $20 and I've paid $200!
      I agree with this. You usually get what you pay for.
      I'd suggest hiring a talented individual that is just starting out as a writer. Give him some guidance and he won't ask too much in return.
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  • Profile picture of the author danielgb123
    I write for the personal blog of a client of mine, and my average price per article is typically around the $60-70 mark.

    It really is a matter of getting what you pay for. You can expect originality and in-depth research, as well as time-tested writing techniques typically with the writers that charge more.

    As someone mentioned above it's a matter of results vs costs. If you are making considerably more profit investing in quality, continue doing so. If you receive similar results to someone that charges $15-20 an article, perhaps reassess that area of your business.
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    • Originally Posted by NicoleBeckett View Post

      I'm a little concerned that you're simply asking for a "grammatically correct article", though. Sure, good grammar is important, but it's not the ONLY thing that goes into a great article. If your $75 article is simply grammatically correct -- and doesn't offer much else -- then, yes, you overpaid.
      This is a very good point, Nicole.

      I'm a full-time writer, and I must admit that I often completely skip job descriptions that mention they want "grammatically correct writing," a "native English-speaking writer," and articles that "can pass Copyscape."

      Why?

      Because these things seem like such a given to me that it boggles my mind a client would bother mentioning them. So I automatically assume the buyer is used to cheap providers and cannot afford my rates or isn't willing to pay them.

      My thinking is that if you work with pros and know one when you see one, you shouldn't have to make these bare-bones, no-brainer demands. They come with the territory.

      If you do feel a need to ask, it might just be time to take a look at some of the other aspects of your screening process. Perhaps I should assume less, however, since it's hard to know what's going through every prospect's mind.

      Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

      Thanks for the responses so far everyone. I appreciate it.

      I'd definitely agree that the ROI is what makes the article ultimately worth it, but, I had a bad experience with paying a guy $30-$40 a review several months ago. Apparently, he didn't think it was enough for the 700-1000 word articles I was asking for and he ended up not fulfilling the contract.

      I decided to up the ante this time around and go for $75 for the same thing. So far so good, and if the articles produce like they did before, it's worth it to me.

      That being said though... I'm not a fan of overpaying for something if I can help it which is what spurred the question. So any other thoughts you guys have are welcome.
      I'm naturally biased, but I think you're paying a fair price, Matt (as long as the work is good). And it sounds like you know how to make quality content work for you, which is definitely a crucial skill to have before making that type of investment in your business.

      You could convince yourself that $10 per article is overpaying if you give too much attention to what a lot of internet marketers are budgeting. Just browse the job listings on Elance or here on the WF.

      But I regularly find clients on Elance that pay the types of prices you are, and sometimes quite a bit more. They are always the pros who take pride in what they're doing, and you can see the results by their success in business.

      Can you find good writers for $10 a pop? Sure, you can. But let's be honest - the only reason these writers are willing to go there is because they don't know what they are doing or are desperate.

      Writing a quality 750-word piece of work can take a couple hours, if not more. Clients expecting that at $10 a pop seem to miss the fact that if they can get the writer to produce entertaining, accurate, and persuasive work, their writer may be making less than minimum wage. It wouldn't even be legal in a normal business context. And even if that doesn't bother you, it certainly doesn't seem ethical or sustainable to me.

      My experience is that you might come across a great writer for cheap every once in a while, but eventually they are either a) not cheap because they raise their rates or b) not a good writer because they get burnt out and/or start trying to write faster.

      A writer spends a lot of time marketing and running the admin side of their business too. And haggling with clients who turn out to be dreamers or don't get it. These "wasted hours" come with running any business in some shape or form, but it's the closed deals that pay those bills.

      That might seem unfair, in a sense, but if the writer doesn't get compensated for that time somewhere, they go out of business and are unavailable, leaving only the cheap writers to fill the gaps. It's yet another reason for the seemingly-high rates.

      A true professional also has to pay taxes, medical, retirement, and general costs associated with being self-employed. You're also paying for professionalism, mutual business respect, punctuality, the emailing back and forth, redrafts if needed, and the peace of mind in knowing your writer won't plagiarize or short-change you in some other way.

      These are just some of the things cheaper content buyers don't take into consideration. You'll often find, in fact, that the longer an IM businessperson stays in the game, the more they are willing to pay for the simple sake of avoiding the hassle. Many of my clients started off paying pennies and later changed their approach.

      You seem to be undergoing that very evolution yourself.

      It's often said in the freelancing world (the one where writers consider themselves real businessfolk) that any creative professional not clearing $100 an hour should go back to getting a job in the real world, otherwise it is not worth their time and the sacrifices they make. If your writer is spending a couple hours on these pieces, they aren't even making that, so I say that as far as intellectual labor goes, you're getting a deal.

      All that said, you are a businessman, and at the end of the day, your bottom line comes first. So, as others have said, if you can't make the content work for you, you're overpaying. Only you know if that's the case.

      Based on what you've posted, though, it sounds like you know what you're doing and are turning a profit. If that profit is also residual, well, that's a solid investment.

      Onward.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mike Martel
        Originally Posted by James Druman View Post

        This is a very good point, Nicole.

        I'm a full-time writer, and I must admit that I often completely skip job descriptions that mention they want "grammatically correct writing," a "native English-speaking writer," and articles that "can pass Copyscape."
        Overall I agree with you but I think you are passing up on some decent opportunities with the statement above. If you are getting all the jobs you can handle, then I guess it is working for you.

        I will and have paid up to $100 for a good article in a specific niche that requires real experience.

        Back to the original poster, you have to be careful on Elance and the other sites that you don't overwhelm your contractors. Most are real professionals and will flake out on you when you start giving them more and more work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Samuel Adams
    Pay what it's worth to you. However, keep in mind that professional writers with lots of experience will charge more. If someone is charging only $2 for an article, they're not likely very experienced or maybe giving you spun content, rather than something original that will help you earn money. You might be lucky enough to find a professional writer who will work for a lower price, but chances are, most will know the value of their work and charge accordingly. But as everyone else has said so far, stick with the writer who is producing the articles which are getting results.
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  • Profile picture of the author Adie
    There is really no standard on pricing the articles. It depends on both the provider and the customer.
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  • Profile picture of the author magneticweb
    If a writer is willing to write articles for $2 each, or even $10 or $30 each, and you're under the impression that such articles will be of benefit to your business then something's wrong.

    If a writer is any good at all he'll be engaged in writing as a full time business. That means, as James Druman has said, that he will be paying all his business overheads (online it's mainly promotion and tax) out of his earnings.

    He has to be charging around $100 an hour at least to cover all this. It's not a case of knocking off a 500 word article at breakneck speed and churning out several of them a day.

    A good article will probably be nearer 1,000 words, and quite likely more, if it's to address the subject comprehensively. There seems to be a kind of unwritten rule that articles should be around 500 words, but there's no evidence to show that this is the ideal length.

    A good writer will spend at least the same amount of time researching his subject as he will in writing it. And a good writer doesn't write. He *re-writes* - sometimes several times. Until he is satisfied that his writing is of high quality and will do the job intended.

    But when it's finished, the content he has created, whether it's an article, a review, a humorous piece, or anything else, will be informative, entertaining and persuasive, and have a little personality of its own.

    If the product you're selling is at least reasonably good and fairly priced then you should make a good return on your investment for a long time.
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    • Profile picture of the author Shadowflux
      I don't mean to sound like a contrarian, I'm certainly not trying to speak out against my fellow writers, but this is far from the first thread I've seen where people are advocating rather high prices on written material.

      Let's be honest. Writing, as a profession, has never really been a million dollar deal. For every J. K. Rowling and E. L. James, there are countless writers who struggle to pay their bills. While I would love to get paid $100 or more for every short piece of material I produce, I know this isn't a viable option for the majority of people hiring writers.

      Part of running a business is fulfilling market demand within the parameters set by the market. In other words, the customer sets the price.

      Business is not easy and the hardest part can be creating a balance between the money you need, the time it takes to do the work, and what clients are expecting in terms of quality and cost. A good professional writer will understand this and will build their business accordingly.

      I've been a full time writer for years now. I've written countless pieces for businesses and individuals all over the world. My clients have ranged from first time IMers to truly recognizable names, projects with high six figure budgets, and millionaires as well.

      I think that puts me in a good position to offer my opinion on what makes someone a good writer for this type of industry.

      Quality

      This is one of the biggest things people look for. The problem is far too many people don't know how to tell the difference between a good writer and a bad one. Most people don't read very much, they often don't write at all. They essentially don't have the experience needed to determine quality.

      A good writer is instantly recognizable by their work. When compared with work by an inferior writer, the difference is like night and day. Quality is about more than grammatical correctness or spelling.

      High quality material has a flow to it. It has it's own identifiable voice. A good writer knows how to explain something in detail or help promote a particular concept. Your writer needs to be able to convince readers to agree with you, to build up to a certain high impact point.

      Speed

      I've always believed that a good writer doesn't agonize over every word. I'm not talking about copywriting, that is a different beast entirely, but articles, content, and books should not be so difficult to write.

      Longer time does not ensure better quality. A novel that took five years to write is not going to be better than a novel that only required a few months because of the time difference alone.

      There's a lot of talk about making a "livable wage" or making "less than minimum wage" as a writer. Honestly, if that's what you're concerned with, as a writer, you should consider getting a regular job. Once again, writing is not a million dollar deal. If you get paid $40 for an article but it takes you six hours to write, that's on you. It's not the client, it's not the market.

      I write quickly because that's what I do. I'm a writer because I communicate better through writing than any other medium. Even my emails to friends fall into the 500 word range and that's if I try to keep it short. I can't imagine spending hours on even a 1,000 word piece unless it was a piece of sales copy. There's just no need.

      The market sets the prices. I don't mean to sound harsh but if it takes you a long time to write something then you can't expect the market to support that with higher prices. Clients will just go somewhere else.

      Price

      This is another big concern. You'll hear a lot of platitudes about the importance of investing in quality or how you get what you pay for. While this is true, I really don't see the need to pay far beyond the standard, average rates, unless a writer was well-known or simply so amazing their work blows your mind.

      Having said all that, you do need to consider the purpose of the material you're hiring someone to create.

      Basic Content
      Basic content is not meant to have a huge impact, it's not meant to be the sole selling mechanism, it's just a blog post. I don't see why you would pay more than a few cents a word for this.

      Featured Articles
      Feature articles should cost a bit more. These are major portions of a website. They'll be promoted on the main page, they're meant to really represent the site, establish authority, and increase readership numbers. I would suggest paying a bit more for feature articles and hiring someone who has experience producing this type of material.

      Promotional Content
      Moving up the scale of importance, things like guest posts and opt-in freebies should be a bit more involved. The same goes for your newsletter. These are created for marketing purposes. They're supposed to promote you, your site, and your products. You should be willing to pay a bit more for these.

      Books
      Books will be one of the more expensive items you hire someone for. Writing a book takes a particular set of skills that is similar yet very different from writing material in the 500-1,000 word range. Creating something in the 10,000 to 100,000+ word range is not easy, particularly if you want something cohesive.

      How to get the most for your money

      My suggestion to the OP and anyone who hires writers, is to diversify your writing resources. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is trying to hire one writer for everything. Getting the most out of your freelancers and employees requires you to make the best use of each person.

      Someone who primarily writes books can probably write some great basic content but that is not the best use of their skills. A writer who creates great feature quality articles may not be the best person to write a book.

      The last thing you want to do is overpay for something you're not truly happy with. The key is to budget yourself. Determine how much you're willing to pay for basic content, major articles, books, letters, and anything else you need. Remember that you'll be paying a bit more for more important material.

      Stick to your budget but shop around. Ask for samples, ask about experience, ask about turn around time. Don't be afraid to tell your prospective writer what your budget is for this project.

      Once you find a really great blog post writer, use them for creating blog posts. When you find a great feature article writer, use them for that purpose. If you find an amazing book writer, have them write your books.

      Avoid the urge to use a "one size fits all" writing solution because there is no such thing. Utilize the time and skills of your writers in the most valuable way possible. This is how you get the greatest ROI.

      Pay people according to their skills and don't try to force them into a box in which they don't fit.

      If you think a writer is overcharging you then you're probably right.
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      • Originally Posted by Shadowflux View Post

        There's a lot of talk about making a "livable wage" or making "less than minimum wage" as a writer. Honestly, if that's what you're concerned with, as a writer, you should consider getting a regular job. Once again, writing is not a million dollar deal. If you get paid $40 for an article but it takes you six hours to write, that's on you. It's not the client, it's not the market.
        Based on your mention of "minimum wage," I can only assume you were referring to my post.

        I like and agree with most of what you said here - fantastic post! But I feel like you may have misinterpreted my intentions...

        I wasn't trying to tell the OP he absolutely must pay these prices and more for all the reasons listed above, etc. I may have gotten carried away on some tangents, but I was just trying to give him some insight on why us writers charge the way we do and why it may be worth it to pay (for those who can afford it).

        I don't always charge those types of rates either. I do often with non-Warrior clients, who are looking for a different standard, but you can see by the rates in my WSO that I write some cheaper content as well.

        I haven't put in the marketing work to make that $100 an hour for every single hour that I work, as I'm a lazy guy who lives in a 4th world country. But nor am I pitching clients with talk about minimum wage and benefits. lol So please try not to get it twisted.

        I'm in the same boat as you and give clients what they pay for; I also often work with budgets, especially if I have some extra time on my hands.

        All that said, clients who pay more often get better service and better content. I simply don't hold myself to the same standard if they aren't willing to pay for that.

        It's a choice every client makes with their budget, and that's fair enough to me.

        I write quickly because that's what I do. I'm a writer because I communicate better through writing than any other medium. Even my emails to friends fall into the 500 word range and that's if I try to keep it short. I can't imagine spending hours on even a 1,000 word piece unless it was a piece of sales copy. There's just no need.
        I also write very quickly and have the same sticking point with emails that you do. But I don't agree with you that writing an article of this length never takes a couple hours. It very well can, depending on the research needs of the project and the complexity of the article.

        For more general content, or niches you have specialized knowledge in, where you can write off the top of your head, an article that length shouldn't take more than an hour, ever, and that's including redrafts. But if it's anything that takes some legitimate research, it can definitely eat up a couple, if not more.

        Other webmasters want articles that are very similar to magazine content. Their business model works - their content takes tiiiiiiiiiime.

        Review content can also take a long time (which is what OP needs) especially if he wants it accurate, detailed, and/or honest. I accept that many IMers aren't concerned with these things though.

        If I want to, I can churn out 3 articles in an hour. But you better believe these are in a whole different universe than something I charge $100 or more for.

        Once again, people really do get what they pay for.

        Let's be honest. Writing, as a profession, has never really been a million dollar deal. For every J. K. Rowling and E. L. James, there are countless writers who struggle to pay their bills. While I would love to get paid $100 or more for every short piece of material I produce, I know this isn't a viable option for the majority of people hiring writers.
        Yes, but you've skipped right over all the authors who are in the mid-range, making a very good living off their writing without being rich and famous. In fact, I'd say that, contrary to popular belief, these authors make up the bulk of the market - I assure you there are many more 6-figure authors than you realize, and they offer something the completely broke authors do not.

        Similarly, there are plenty of freelancers making mid to high 5-figures and 6-figures. Their content and their professionalism is a far cry from the countless writers struggling to pay their bills. I honestly don't even put them in the same ballpark. And their clients are extremely happy with them - enough to keep beating down their doors for more.

        Part of running a business is fulfilling market demand within the parameters set by the market. In other words, the customer sets the price.
        This is true, but you've only penned half of the story. Price is also impacted by supply - it's not all demand.

        The providers set the price. The customer decides whether to buy or not. If they demand a lower price, the suppliers may accept that, but it's a cold truth in capitalism that the quality of the supply may also go down.

        If the buyers aren't hip to that, they may compromise by agreeing to pay more, and the price creeps up again. Thus an equilibrium is met.

        Or, as I said in my post:

        if the writer doesn't get compensated for that time somewhere, they go out of business and are unavailable, leaving only the cheap writers to fill the gaps. It's yet another reason for the seemingly-high rates.
        It's also true that the quality writers may just decrease their efforts and join the lower-priced markets. The buyers get what they want, but they also lose something.

        In these ways and more, the supply of quality writing with quality service is most definitely finite.

        On the other hand, you talk as if there is only one writing market. But you simply can't tell me that a guy getting paid $1 for an article is serving the same market as a guy that is getting $75. It just isn't so.

        Which market the OP places himself in is up to him and his business, but there is a market for both - several in fact - price ranges. My main point was that those who compose the mid-range and upper market are buying a lot more than just words on a page...

        This is another big concern. You'll hear a lot of platitudes about the importance of investing in quality or how you get what you pay for. While this is true, I really don't see the need to pay far beyond the standard, average rates, unless a writer was well-known or simply so amazing their work blows your mind.
        And then there is complex content. Some content may not be mind-bending, but as mentioned above, it may take more time to do. What a client pays will partly be based on this not because they care what their writer makes but because the time it takes to produce something in this economy has a direct correlation to its value, and smart providers charge accordingly.

        If you think a writer is overcharging you then you're probably right.
        Maybe. It isn't surprising that with all the talk of cheap content that goes on in internet marketing circles that there is some confusion of what people should be paying. Thus, it doesn't surprise me that someone like the OP would at least wonder if they could get their content for cheaper.

        That doesn't automatically mean, however, that they're paying too much, and they'll often find themselves disappointed if they decide to go with a provider who charges less.

        One client may be paying $100 an article and hear of someone paying $80 and wonder. A client may be paying $30 and hear their friend is paying $10 and wonder. Wondering doesn't automatically mean they're paying too much.

        Or, I might buy a pickup truck for $29,000 and hear my friend bought a pickup truck for $23,000 and wonder if I paid too much. Wondering does not make it so. There aren't enough details.

        What condition is my friend's pickup in? Make and model? Does the engine purr just the same - are there underlying issues? Has it been a wreck before? Does it come with a warranty and service agreement? What's the mileage? Until I climb in the thing to have a look around and maybe a peek under the hood, I have no clue.

        Which, to be fair, can be covered by your suggestion to try out multiple writers...I wholeheartedly agree with that.

        My main point is that if price were the only variable considered, the client starts toeing a slippery slope that can quickly become a race to the bottom.

        Lest you think I'm trying to argue you with you, I do agree with the gist of your post. In fact, if you pay attention to the last couple paragraphs of mine, I essentially said the same thing as you, which is that whether it's too much or not depends on the OP's business and ability to turn a profit.

        I just feel you may have stated your case a bit too strongly.

        Then again, i may have done a bit of the same...

        With Respect,
        James
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      • Profile picture of the author Marketer Matt
        As many have pointed out, the type of content helps to determine the price. I need the articles I'm paying for to fulfill a particular purpose: They need to sell. Writers need to have familiarity with the products already and there is some time involved in using the products so that it can be reviewed. I also need the articles to SELL. They need to have a copy writing edge to them (talking benefits instead of features, overcoming objections, etc.) Because of these reasons, and because my ROI on such reviews has been fantastic in the past, is why I set the price at $75 per article.

        So does anyone have any comments on review articles specifically? I would assume that it makes sense to include compensation for the time it takes to test a product out in addition to the article itself?

        @Shadowflux - That was very well said. I really appreciate your perspective, and I'll probably reference your post in the future as I think it really covered so much of what needs to be said.

        @Marx - I hadn't considered cutting the authors in on the products sold from a review. I love the idea!

        Most of what I do concerns affiliate commissions, and the downside of affiliate sales is that you can't track the source through to the sale, so it doesn't seem obvious to me how to track the sales from one article over another so that a writer could be paid on it.

        And for you writers out there... would you be interested in this type of proposition where you get paid a flat fee + % of the commissions?

        Thanks again for all of the feedback guys, this is incredibly helpful!
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        • Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

          As many have pointed out, the type of content helps to determine the price. I need the articles I'm paying for to fulfill a particular purpose: They need to sell. Writers need to have familiarity with the products already and there is some time involved in using the products so that it can be reviewed. I also need the articles to SELL. They need to have a copy writing edge to them (talking benefits instead of features, overcoming objections, etc.) Because of these reasons, and because my ROI on such reviews has been fantastic in the past, is why I set the price at $75 per article.

          So does anyone have any comments on review articles specifically? I would assume that it makes sense to include compensation for the time it takes to test a product out in addition to the article itself?

          @Shadowflux - That was very well said. I really appreciate your perspective, and I'll probably reference your post in the future as I think it really covered so much of what needs to be said.

          @Marx - I hadn't considered cutting the authors in on the products sold from a review. I love the idea!

          Most of what I do concerns affiliate commissions, and the downside of affiliate sales is that you can't track the source through to the sale, so it doesn't seem obvious to me how to track the sales from one article over another so that a writer could be paid on it.

          And for you writers out there... would you be interested in this type of proposition where you get paid a flat fee + % of the commissions?

          Thanks again for all of the feedback guys, this is incredibly helpful!
          I do think commission setups would be interesting.

          I haven't messed with them myself because all but one buyer who approached me about it didn't seem to have the track record to back it up.

          But if someone could show that he or she knew what they were doing - that they could drive traffic and use good content to turn a healthy profit, then I would definitely consider the agreement. I actually have one client who has paid me before that's presented such an offer, and in his case I am considering it, though I'm waiting for more details.

          I do wonder what would be in it for the marketer though. It seems to me that if they were convinced they could make money, they might as well cash out the writer and be done with it so they could collect all the profits for themselves.

          That said, offering a percentage isn't unheard of in the copywriting world, so there must be a legitimate line of rationality for it on both sides. Just not something I personally have experience with (yet).
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        • Profile picture of the author Shadowflux
          Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post


          And for you writers out there... would you be interested in this type of proposition where you get paid a flat fee + % of the commissions?
          I would certainly consider it, especially if the flat fee was a fair price for the material you need. The thing is most copywriters aren't interested in reducing their fee for a portion of commission for a good reason.

          The success of your marketing efforts is only partly due to the quality of the copy. It really depends on your ability to promote that copy, to drive people to it. To put it as simply as possible, the success of your copy depends on your ability to get people in front of it.

          If you can prove that your marketing is effective, if you can provide stats that say "I sell 100 copies a week, which comes to $500 in commission, your portion being $100" I think you'll have an easier time finding someone who will accept that strategy.

          If you're really doing well with the commissions, you might be able to find a business minded writer who would take a very low flat rate in exchange for a share of the profits.

          You could structure it so the flat fee is progressively diminishing as the total commissions, when added together, continue to rise. It would be a "Rent to own" sort of situation where your writer would eventually become a partner in the busienss and would write for commissions alone.

          It's an idea, at least.
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        • Marketer Matt,

          Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

          I need the articles I'm paying for to fulfill a particular purpose: They need to sell. They need to have a copy writing edge to them (talking benefits instead of features, overcoming objections, etc.)

          @Marx - I hadn't considered cutting the authors in on the products sold from a review. I love the idea! Most of what I do concerns affiliate commissions, and the downside of affiliate sales is that you can't track the source through to the sale, so it doesn't seem obvious to me how to track the sales from one article over another so that a writer could be paid on it.
          Hmmm... This results-based incentive system is most suitable for multimedia advertising / marketing and Web property content development companies like us that have contracts with product manufacturers / developers, direct distributors and retailers (non-affiliates).

          You could try contacting your affiliate manager and ask for a tiered system where you would be able to create tier-two affiliate links for each of your writers (and other employees or subcontractors). This way, you'll be able to include their tier-two affiliate links in their reviews when you publish it in your onsite and offsite networks. Many affiliate management companies will do this for you.

          This will allow you to track lead / subscriber / trial offer taker / buyer conversions of each review / content material, while your writers / employees / subcontractors will also be able to track the results of your marketing work (organic, paid and search traffic) through their tier-two affiliate account panels. Some of your writers could also be interested in driving traffic to their work, especially with your marketing guidance...
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  • Profile picture of the author bluebrain
    I've heard that you can get articles written even for $1 if you post ads on freelance sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author jazbo
    Quality costs and anyone who doesn't grasp that is going to be throwing money down the drain on $5 articles that Google laughs at and anyone who does read it wonders why they bothered.

    If it is copy for a landing page that makes you money, is $200 too much for 500 words that convert?

    If 500 words gets you ranked, shared and converts year after year, was $100 for those words "too much".

    If anyone thinks that paying peanuts will get them rankings and traffic they are deluded.
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  • Profile picture of the author guitarizma
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
    If you get an ezine post written for $75 and only want the post to serve as a backlink, the price is way too much. But if its a guest post on a premium blog linking back to you, it might or might not be enough.

    I'm a writer and am speaking from experience. If a writer has to write 15 articles a day for $2 each to feed himself you can't expect him to deliver quality.

    I personally charge $30/500-750 words and write 4-5 articles a day and go to bed tired from so much research, but I don't complain because my paypal balance keeps me happy.

    So, that's it. Writing isn't any different from carving on wood - if the worker is happy he'll deliver a masterpiece, else you'll have to stay happy with wood shavings and shallow stuff!
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  • Marketer Matt,

    For the sample talent acquisition campaign below -- I'd most likely offer qualified subcontractors $30 per 3,500++ words and a fourth of my company's commissions (from our client) for each sale that's generated by each product review, or $32 for 3,500++ words without commissions (in case we don't have a similar incentive agreement with our client). Here's why:

    Industry expertise, niche knowledge depth, writing experience and country-specific standard hourly prices are the fundamentals that I use to formulate and implement talent acquisition campaigns for my ICT company. Here's a similar talent acquisition campaign that I normally implement for our clients:

    If our client needs comprehensive content for English-speaking readers, specifically reviews of computer and telephony hardware / software products that are used to set up, operate and maintain local and wireless enterprise networks of mid-scale tech support call centers, then I'd most likely hire ICT professionals with relevant educational background and training credentials, more than five years of relevant experience in the ICT industry, more than five years of experience in developing and operating tech support call centers and more than five years of relevant writing experience for a similar target audience...

    Now, if I were interested in hiring qualified professionals based here in the Philippines as subcontractors, and if they need to test specific products before writing reviews so as to also include relevant images and video content that can improve the overall presentation of the reviews, then I'd need to formulate a compelling offer for them. I'd use the following pieces of information to do this:

    *** Local industry standard hourly employee wages -- Let's say it's ccurrently $2.15 per hour for similar ICT expertise and $1.75 per hour for similar writing experience);
    *** Hourly rates offered by top local ICT companies and news media publishers with English-speaking target markets -- Let's say it's ccurrently $3 per hour for similar ICT expertise and $2.65 per hour for similar writing experience);
    *** Expected work output volume per 8-hour work day, including product testing and writing -- Let's say this'd normally be 3,500++ words per 8-hour work day; and
    *** Other relevant things like employee benefits and insurance...

    The things above could be repurposed into a template that you can test with a variety of areas where you want to hire talent from...
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    I'd pay nothing. I'd write the 1,000+ word article myself. How many are you looking to write per day? If only 1... then this can be done within 20 minutes every morning.
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  • Profile picture of the author Fayazjan1
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author Devid Farah
      Originally Posted by Fayazjan1 View Post

      well $75 for an article is toot much you should find someone else..
      $75 is too much? Wow...

      You probably don't know what an excellent article can do for you! It can skyrocket your visibility, business and traffic in a heartbeat!

      It depends who you work with.

      If the article is written by a TOP ghostwriter can cost u a lot. There are top ghostwriters who charge from $95 to $500 per 500/1000 word articles and even more but what you get in return is an extremely compelling and engaging article that makes you click any button like crazy.

      A ghostwriter i worked with in the past(one of my partners) was charging $1,000 per 1500/2000 word article.

      Now, youd say "CRAZY", the only thing is that he was the copywriter behind many CB bestsellers.

      So, you get what you pay for.

      Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author maz1207
    You can hire an English native speaker to write 500 words article for $20 to $50. A few websites where you can order article writer (less than $75):

    iWriter (most recommended)
    hirewriters.com
    Odesk
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  • Hey Matt

    In most cases it's not actually about the article it is about the value of that article to your income plan.

    Pick the wrong keywords and a great article is worthless so $75 is a complete waste of money.

    Pick the right keywords and $2 might be an absolute winner (as long as it made sense and read reasonably well - and was run through copyscape of course).

    Regards

    Bronwyn and Keith
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery Moss
    If you can get a $500 article written for $1.00, then you should go for it. But, that's not likely to happen. You will get run of the mill, spun content if you pay so little. If someone is charging so little for their content, then it means either they are giving you a copy/spun version of what they gave to someone else or just using you for practice. And, either way, you have to decide what your site is worth to you before you risk it.
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  • Profile picture of the author kfount
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
    There are many good writers that are struggling to even earn $75.00. As such, you are doing them a service by charging that price. Especially if the article is EASY TO WRITE AND TAKES AN HOUR OR LESS OF THE PERSON'S TIME.

    For those that want to get paid what they are supposedly worth, maybe they need to check into what legitimate ghostwriters make. We are talking HUNDREDS PER PAGE, not $0.01 per word.

    That's why Arbor Press charges TENS OF THOUSANDS for their material.

    Anyway, where you MIGHT be hurting your writers is at the $2.00 to $5.00 price point.

    I have no problems writing for $2.00. Rewrites are easy...

    But if there is an outsourcer that has their own problems, well I'm forced to create a Harvard dissertation at a price that's still ridiculous.

    The outsourcer wins... but the person writing for $2.00 has to waste hours trying to create a masterpiece.

    True piranhas cancel the work anyway. It doesn't matter what your avatar looks like, what your grammar inconsistencies are, or whether or not you followed the person's instructions. If they want free work, they use WHATEVER you give them and don't pay. At that point, you have to get legally involved to get your money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joshua Young
    $75 is a lot but not out of line for an excellent writer that has outstanding marketing abilities.... I am a full time writer and have a lot of projects that I have charged this much for but the $35-$40 range is what I normally charge. So if you are not happy with the results of your $35 guy then I would say you probably just need to find someone else...

    I have tried to outsource writing projects at the $6-$10 range and most of the time they are crap and I have to rewrite them... So going to cheap is not good...
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      IMO, there is no better substitute for evaluating article syndication results than bottom line ROI. However, establishing metrics for measuring effectiveness should be applied to every stage of your marketing efforts, not limited to just article response. For example, continually track the sales process such as traffic source, funnel system, filters (lead qualification), follow-up, product mix, repeat sales rate, etc.

      Because of the extensive resources used in producing and distributing each article, accurate tracking for me is essential. This particular method may not be helpful to you except perhaps for illustration, but what I do to track articles is use a short source code appended to the link in the resource box.

      Every publisher in my syndication network is assigned a four-symbol alphanumeric code, and every article also has a unique identifier such as a modified Julian date. For example: mysite.com/?ABCD4091801 indicates the originating source and which article (first article written on 1/10/2012) resulted in the call to action click.

      While not exact, the revenue from sales extracted from each publisher source is amortized over the number of articles submitted, giving a general average ROI of the articles. The more successful articles are then submitted to other outlets such as relevant websites, ezines, blogs, and offline publications.

      Although there are additional sales made from opt-in subscribers and other integrated marketing channels as a direct result of these articles, this is considered ancillary marketing, which results are all tracked separately. The importance of knowing how much profit (or loss) is in your marketing processes and business activities cannot be over emphasized.
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  • Profile picture of the author mojoogden
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    • Profile picture of the author heavysm
      I recall a writer i had a few years ago, a college grad, who offered something like $2 per 100 words. At the time I thought it was insane until i took him up on his trial of $1 - 100, then i immediately started paying him his regular rate.

      The quality far surpassed anything I had expected and felt very persuasive. I felt compelled to buy the product upon finishing the article LOL (it was a product review) and at most I ended up paying him $2.5 - 3 per 100 words, just because it was that good.

      I've dealt with writers that charge $1.5 per 100 and the writing was highly fluffed with unneeded info, and I've paid $.85 - $1 for decent quality. It's all about the intent of the article and how much it's giving you back (you should be tracking your investments at all times, ya know ).

      I like that writers have come to pitch in on this thread since this allows me to see new prospects for projects i have coming up soon :p
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  • Profile picture of the author Rappostion
    $75 per article for me is too expensive. $20 - $30 is reasonable and you will find really great writers offering articles in this price range.
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  • Profile picture of the author PikaV
    $75 an article seems a little steep to me, seeing as no client would ever pay me that much for an article. However, if it is given the ROI you wanted, then it is worth it. You can find great article writing services that offer the same results you are looking for such as iWriter.com or SEOWriterForHire.com. Hope that helps. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I don't do a lot of article writing but I would NOT go below $150 per article.
    But again that's on the low end considering that I can get a lot more for
    writing the same amount of words as a copywriter. And this is my baseline.
    Why would I spend time writing an article when I could write a sales letter
    for a lot more?

    It's tough to see the kind of abuse article writers endure. A well-written
    article gives the owner CREDIBILITY. That's no walk-in-the-park to write.
    So pay them accordingly.

    -Ray Edwards
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    • Profile picture of the author master reseller
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      I don't do a lot of article writing but I would NOT go below $150 per article.
      But again that's on the low end considering that I can get a lot more for
      writing the same amount of words as a copywriter. And this is my baseline.
      Why would I spend time writing an article when I could write a sales letter
      for a lot more?

      It's tough to see the kind of abuse article writers endure. A well-written
      article gives the owner CREDIBILITY. That's no walk-in-the-park to write.
      So pay them accordingly.

      -Ray Edwards
      Very much agreed! There's a difference between a real professional writer and a dabbler working on a $5.00 service site that is only writing for pocket money. The professional writer is making a career/full time income out of this, the other is not.
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  • Profile picture of the author saulmaraney
    iwriter has worked best for me. their rates are very good - $50-$70
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Williams
    There's no price too high or too low. Other than the fact that
    getting a great article for under $10 should make you feel a
    little dirty... If you make money, you make money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Benjamin Ehinger
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
    What you pay isn't important. However, what you pay versus how much the content will make you is important. I can write grammatically correct content all day long and it won't do you any good, unless I understand your goals and your niche. Content doesn't have to be salesy to sell and make you money.

    If the content is simply grammatically correct, I wouldn't even buy it. If you've read any recent blog posts, on any of the popular blogs, you'd find out that grammar takes a back seat to conversational English, which doesn't always fit with perfect grammar. However, this type of content sells, gets shared like crazy and makes blog/website owners money.

    Instead of looking at what you spend only, look at the entire picture. Just my two cents.

    Benjamin Ehinger
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  • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
    If it is an pre-sale page, oriented towards making sales, then no. It is not too much. These type of pages can go up to $300 - $400 - $500.

    However, in the end, it comes down to results. If you invest $500 and you get $5000 in profit, then it is a good deal. If you invest $25 and you get nothing at all, it is a very bad deal.

    The last time I wrote an 500 page article, it was for $75 a piece and only because it was something I was passionate about. Otherwise, writing sales copy is far more interesting, better ROI and 80% of the time is about using your mind to make things better, not to hit a word count.

    PS: It is amazing how so many people ask native English speakers to write $5 / 500 words articles but nobody gives a damn when you get into the $50 - $100 - $150 field. After all, hiring someone to proof is not that expensive.
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  • Profile picture of the author marax
    $75 is a small price for a great article.
    And I'm not talking about sales copy.
    The problem these days is that many writer thinks they are worth that much.
    But all they do is deliver grammer free artilces without real substance.
    To them, that is good enough to warrant $75 :S

    To add to that, they can then "fake" how good their articles are by buying social shares to their work.

    I've tried hiring both cheap and expensive writers.
    And I have to say that the main difference is usually just typos and grammer.
    You can easily get a writer who can deliver good grammer on fiverr.
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  • Profile picture of the author gmarklin
    You need to determine how much money you have paid out and what you have in return, If you are going to continue on this road, you need to track what and who you are paying and see what the returns are on each. who ever has the highest returns, then I guess that is what you pay.

    If you take some writing courses I am sure you could do almost as well
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  • Profile picture of the author Carsten Tiensuu
    You should look at epicwrite there you can get nearly everything written for $1 per 100 words from native english writers with 5 star ratings (Top rating). It´s high quality writing galore....If you pay $75 for an article...that´s simple ripoff in my opinion..

    Have a nice sunday
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  • Profile picture of the author ethanalvin
    You pay for quality. It's rare to be able to find a good writer at a low rate. I honestly don't mind paying $75 if it brings in >200% ROI.

    At some point, you'll become sick of low quality articles.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oba
    Hi,
    The cost of good article should not be a problem so far the article help your website ranking and sales.
    I found a particular writer who is good with her job on fiverr. You can check her out, just in case https://www.fiverr.com/s/6h6lsi
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    • Profile picture of the author Andrew Wilson
      The first question, before talking about money is PURPOSE.

      What job is the article supposed to achieve?

      Look at the task in the same way that a magazine or newspaper would - understand what the purpose of the article is then look at the priority of the piece. For example, is the article run of site or is it a prime editorial or pre-sell piece? The priority of run of site is going to be less than for primary editorial or pre-sell and so it will be allocated less money. The most expensive content in a magazine will be the editorial piece, then features, then run of paper then fillers.

      Also, in our context there's going to be content used to promote your site in one way or another and, again, there's going to be differing priorities.

      The way I dealt with the issue was to see how much (or little) I had to spend in order to receive quality in line with my expectations for the content. When you can see how much you are paying for the different levels you can set budgets and make choices about how many articles to buy in various levels on your site and in syndication.

      I bet that once you look at your content needs then the prices you pay and the quality you get will start to become much more clear for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author collison
    What was the return on investment(ROI) on th $2 article? And what was the ROI on the $75 article? Was the return on the $75 article, more than 35 times that of the $2 article if so, was then it is worth it!

    If not, then there will be figure in between those two numbers where the ROI is at it's highest point: That is the right price for the article. Which price point gives the best ROI?
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  • Profile picture of the author gmarklin
    You are asking for a grammatically article, and that is your only criteria, you can probably get one for $10, it the article is one where you are to sell something, $75 may be a cheap price if you are very successful with the article. There are a lot of writers looking for work, but what you need in an article is the difference
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  • Profile picture of the author Lightlysalted
    Agreed, you get what you pay for and if you want good content then you need to be willing to pay for talented writers who can provide you details of their work. if you cheap out you lose out
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  • Profile picture of the author wordsuwant09
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan Henson
      For a grammatically correct, engaging article I would pay $.02 to $.03 cents a word ($2.00 - $3.00 dollars per 100 words).

      If a writer delivers an uninteresting article that is not engaging and he or she charges me 2-3 bucks per 100 words, I ask for a rewrite and if it's still a dud, I usually accept the article and go on to the next writer. I'm not worried 'cause I can fix it myself.

      If I outsource a bunch of $1.00 dollar per 100 words article, I know what I'm getting in terms of inferior quality (usually, not always), and I simply correct them and add my own flavor.

      Outsourcing is a constant struggle but when you find a great writer, you have to capitalize on it and ride the wave as long as you can.
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  • Profile picture of the author Boonqueesha
    Holy crap. You paid $75 for an 800 word review? Where do I go to offer my services in that price range? I have a gig on Fiverr offering 600 word articles for $5. They might not be perfect, but I put a lot of effort into my pieces. I know it isn't feasible to write everything yourself (especially reviews), but good lord. That better have been a damned good article.
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  • Profile picture of the author Curtis2011
    I wouldn't pay $75 for anything that was only 700 words long unless it was either highly technical or the product review was written by someone who was an expert about that product. Even then, that's a high price that I would still probably never pay.

    I have a decent amount of experience outsourcing to writers on Elance over the last 5 years and I can tell you that you can find great writers for very cheap if you know how to look for them correctly. I once hired a licensed physician to write for me at $10 per 500 word article for a medical niche site. I also created another niche site and for $12 an article I hired a writer who had been teaching live workshops in that niche for years.

    My point is to never listen to the people that claim you have to pay boatloads of cash to hire experts or great writers. The truth is that there are thousands of great writers out there who are struggling for freelance work, and they are willing to produce great content for very affordable prices, because freelance writing is an extremely competitive field.
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  • Profile picture of the author Slade556
    Someone who is willing to write an article for only $2 is either using copied content, so they really won't write anything themselves, or they will deliver a very, very low quality article!

    You can get good quality articles at good prices, lower than $75. The thing is, good writers, who KNOW what they're doing, will probably not even accept to look at your offer if you're not willing to pay. Some are worth it, some are not though.
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    • Profile picture of the author discrat
      Originally Posted by Slade556 View Post

      Someone who is willing to write an article for only $2 is either using copied content, so they really won't write anything themselves, or they will deliver a very, very low quality article!
      Actually, I have come into contact with several very talented Writers who were breaking into the Industry and charged rates like this to get new clients.

      So it does happen sometimes


      - Robert Andrew
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      • Profile picture of the author Kingshouse
        Quote:
        Originally Posted by Slade556 View Post
        Someone who is willing to write an article for only $2 is either using copied content, so they really won't write anything themselves, or they will deliver a very, very low quality article!


        Maybe you are thinking of just USA writers. There are very talented writers in certain countries for whom $2 is a lot of money in the local currency. You only have to look at the popular content outsourcing sites (I shan't mention names here) to find them...

        Kingshouse
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  • Profile picture of the author navyvai
    Originally Posted by Marketer Matt View Post

    Over the past 6 months or so, I've cycled through nearly a dozen writers ranging between $2 an article and $75 an article across 3 different niches. I still feel like I'm pretty new to this outsourcing thing, so I was curious what you Warriors thought and if you'd be willing to share about your experiences - especially in terms of cost vs quality...

    Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys
    According to me the rate fully depends on writing quality. Such as some people write 300 words for $1 (Due to low quality), on the other hand some people write 300 words for $20 (For Good qualities), so you have to measured by getting the writing quality.
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  • Profile picture of the author JenniferGiacoppo
    I am not real sure abut the pricing, but this might help you out. I recently discovered Odesk.com and like all things if you look into people you can see their ratings and stars. There is another source called guru.com There is definitely good people to work with but it does pay to check them out and when you are on to a good writer....stick with them....hire and re-hire them.....you will build a relationship as well and one you can trust.
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  • Yes, It's too much..

    I don't see why you don't just use guest posting..

    > You get free content, in return for links

    Seems like the perfect solution for marketers.

    However, back to your question..

    Yes, that's probably too much!
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  • Profile picture of the author kk075
    As a writer myself that earns good money from my craft, I can't help but giggle a little bit at this topic. So let me try to answer the question a different way.

    Your sink is leaking. You call two plumbers. One will fix the leak for $50, the other wants $150. Both will do the same thing- cut out a leaky pipe and replace it with a new one. Both use the same glue. Both use the same pipe. Both even use the same saw. Which should you hire?

    Your're being sued. You call two lawyers. One charges $50 an hour, the other wants $150 an hour. Both do the same thing- they defend you. Both look at evidence. Both talk on your behalf. Both are licensed by your state. Which do you hire?

    In the plumbers case, it doesn't matter who you hire...because there's a cap on the quality you'll receive. Either they can cut out the pipe or they can't...and there's a good chance the $50 guy will come through just fine. The price difference is how they value their actual time, not the quality they deliver.

    The lawyers, on the other hand, use dozens of skills to represent their clients. How good is each finding information? How well do they know the specific law that pertains to you? How far will they push to make you win? Lots of factors here. And who knows, the $50 lawyer may be better...but there's no way to answer that question without seeing their results.

    Now let's talk about writers. In fact, let's talk about me specifically. I probably have 5,000 articles written in Google's database and hundreds of them are on major media and authority sites. Google likes me...a lot...and just my name on a page gives the site in question some link-juice. I also have thousands of niche followers in the 3 industries I try to focus on, plus I've been quoted/interviewed in the media numerous times as an industry expert. In some ways though, none of that is remotely as important as how I engage readers and get conversations started. I write popular pages that tell stories and entertain the audience.

    Hiring a writer is not a "plumber thing" where all the work is equal. It is absolutely about more than just words on a page, which Google has made abundantly clear for over 20 years now. You can find great writers for $5 an article, $50 an article and even $500 an article and their words may appear similar, but what you should really be paying attention to is the number of page hits each article takes, the amount of conversations that come from each, and the number of actual customers you gain because of that writing.

    So is $75 an article too much? For some, it's probably way too much.,,and that's because they aren't focusing on their return on investment. This is a "lawyer thing" where results actually matter and there is no set price there.

    One last thing though; it boggles my mind to see some writers here talk about how they're great writers at $5 per article. If that's all you value your time, then you're right....the article is only worth five bucks. But you should be asking yourself, "How do I make this article worth $10...or $25....or $100?" And then you should back up that claim with quality and results. Because you see where your articles are published and you have the ability to track their engagement yourself, but are you doing that? Or are you just selling 500 words?

    Writers who care about their clients and focus on helping them make money are far more valuable. Never forget that writers!
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  • Profile picture of the author CharliePX
    It depends on the quality. If the writer is a professional journalist then this amount of money doesn't look huge. Compare the quality with similar articles found on popular websites.
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  • Profile picture of the author skyro
    $75 is a bit steep for a article to me. I gotten some really good 500 word articles written for about $10 and average ones for about $5. I guess it really depends on how good the article is and what are you using it for.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brant
    [quote/] Is $75 for an article (specifically a product review in the 700 word range ) too much?

    What would you pay for a grammatically correct article that's 300-500 words? What about 700-1200 words?

    Thanks guys[/quote]

    $75 for a 700 word product review is relatively low, if you really want quality (and geting that ought to be your number one priority.)

    People saying that you can get a "flawlessly written" article of that length for far less than $75 are people who don't know good writing from bad, and also don't care to know. They also don't care if a writer has to survive on kettle chips and can't afford a car while working his as* off.

    A bright sixth-grader is capable of writing a grammatically correct article. So what? Is a sixth-grader, no matter how bright, really doing to deliver written content that people ought to be reading and which makes you look great? (Here's a hint: "yes" is not a correct answer.)

    I get paid $100 to $150 for a 700-or-so word product review piece.
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  • Profile picture of the author ACandi
    Hi Matt,

    Take a look at iWriter for details of payments for articles in given topics, number of words etc. You'll find it very helpful. Click Here

    LB.
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    Turn $50 into $500!
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