Advertising a new page

by rwow
18 replies
Hi all,

I'm just curious as to what steps everybody takes when publishing a new page on their websites. I have been publishing through social media channels with limited success. I do also SEO the pages but that is something that isn't going to get quick results and won't help me get the word spread.

What are the steps you take when publishing a new page/post?

Thanks
Rwow
#advertising #page
  • Profile picture of the author bluebrain
    If you use Wordpress, there is a pluggin called CommentLuv, which will display the last post you made when you comment on other people's blogs. This can help drive traffic to your last post.
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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      Originally Posted by bluebrain View Post

      If you use Wordpress, there is a pluggin called CommentLuv, which will display the last post you made when you comment on other people's blogs. This can help drive traffic to your last post.
      I usually just avoid thing's like this because I get relevant generic comments. Have you genuinely seen a increase if quality traffic from this?

      Rwow
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  • Profile picture of the author Brand New Guy
    All I do is post. WordPress tells Google there's something new, I wait a minute for it to get indexed, and then I get traffic. My trick is just to have keywords and phrases people are searching for, but without too much competition, and then providing the information people were looking for.
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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      Originally Posted by Brand New Guy View Post

      All I do is post. WordPress tells Google there's something new, I wait a minute for it to get indexed, and then I get traffic. My trick is just to have keywords and phrases people are searching for, but without too much competition, and then providing the information people were looking for.
      Do you just rely on google? Trying to increase the buzz about my pages/posts as they should be something my readers are excited about reading.

      Rwow
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      • Profile picture of the author Brand New Guy
        Originally Posted by rwow View Post

        Do you just rely on google? Trying to increase the buzz about my pages/posts as they should be something my readers are excited about reading.

        Rwow
        Yeah, I'm just relying on Google right now, which I know people advise against, but I'm fairly new to the game.

        I don't think my readers are particularly excited about what reading what I post, but it is what they're looking for, and I try to keep it interesting enough that they'll keep reading and hopefully click through my affiliate links, which many do. If you've got something genuinely exciting to read, it should be even easier.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jassen
    I do the same thing: Just post. Google loves quality, original content.

    I'm starting to feel like an evangelist or preacher about this, but people really do overcomplicate things. Create good content, post it. WordPress is automatically pre-configured to ping your new posts to some thingy out there, a post notifier or something, I don't know what it is. This then signals Google to say, "Hey, come look at me!" and voila. I get nearly all my traffic from Google, and I rank very high for specific keywords simply by being a blogger. No gimmicks, no spamming, no black hat crap.

    I post at least once per week, and it takes about 6 months for a new site to climb the rankings. With every Google update (Panda, Penguin, Elephant, Musk Ox, whatever), my rankings in the search results go UP, because the updates clean out all the idiots that are trying to game the system. I *love* when Google does algorithm changes -- I see visible spikes in traffic, opt-ins, and course sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      I'm launching a new blog which is why I'm asking. I plan on utilising Google with unique content but I was just interested in how people are advertising their pages.

      I'm looking at building a bit more of a following on social media with this new website but initially I'm going to have to pay for advertising. I would like to look at other ways to drive traffic which will help SEO anyways.
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  • Profile picture of the author dcmarketer
    Hey Rwow,

    One of the cheapest and fastest ways I've been building large audiences lately is by using Facebook and setting up a fan page associated for the website in question.

    So if you're looking to spend some money, it might be worth considering. It's also has good long term SEO advantages, as social indicators (likes, comments and shares etc.) become even more important in the SEO equation. Basically use the legitimate Facebook advertising platform to build up the fan base.

    You can start testing with as little as $5 per day to acquire new fans (and I'd recommend starting that low) with a bunch of different campaigns.

    From there if you invest just $20-$30 per day once you know your numbers, within a month or two you can be up to 20k+ fans. The key is to start slow with the ad campaigns, test plenty of ads, different target audiences (with precise interests), know your numbers and scale up from there where appropriate. It's not hard, just a matter of being sensible.

    Also, with the right publishing schedule (to the fan page), you can pull in anywhere from a few hundred to 1k+ visits per day to your website with a fan base of that size (we've been doing that by making just 5 posts per day to the fan page - and it doesn't even have to be your own content). Takes roughly 30 minutes per day to do that, and you can schedule content posting days or weeks in advance (if you're using Wordpress) using free plugins - so you don't have to "baby sit" the content posting every day if you don't want to.

    You can also offset the costs of growing the fan page audience by using strategic placement of AdSense ads and affiliate offers etc. on your actual website. Obviously, the more you can offset the expenditure via revenue generation, the cheaper it is to build up your audience - in the right markets, the cost to build the audience could potentially cover the costs of growing the fan base itself. Again, testing is the key.

    Pretty much every post we make to our blogs get at least 100 "likes" - usually considerably more (some into the thousands - all coming back to our site from the fan page), so that isn't going to "hurt" your SEO at all - in fact, you won't need to do much SEO at all if you're also posting unique content to your blog and it gets that kind of social activity. FYI - that's also without continual ad spend (we just rely on the organic reach of the fan base as it exists - we don't do "boosted posts").

    Ultimately, think of the fan page as a mailing list.

    Once you build the audience, you don't need to spend any additional investment to keep in touch with that list (unless you choose to by boosting posts etc.).

    Basically just keep feeding them appealing content, and they'll keep coming back to your site.

    From there the goal is to get them onto your actual email list, just as a backup (and so you can connect with them when they're not on Facebook and are more responsive to your offers).

    It's a nice approach, because unlike PPC (AdWords etc.) once you've acquired a fan, you can keep putting your content into their newsfeed, so the one time cost to acquire them (whether that's $0.04 per new fan or $0.10 per new fan initially) actually diminishes over time - that is you can keep them coming back for the one time cost. With direct PPC you have to pay to get clicks every time (if they don't opt in).

    Something to consider anyway.

    Best...

    Duncan
    Signature

    Pinterest Marketing Blueprint -> http://www.PinterestMarketingBlueprint.com/

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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      Originally Posted by dcmarketer View Post

      Hey Rwow,

      One of the cheapest and fastest ways I've been building large audiences lately is by using Facebook and setting up a fan page associated for the website in question.

      So if you're looking to spend some money, it might be worth considering. It's also has good long term SEO advantages, as social indicators (likes, comments and shares etc.) become even more important in the SEO equation. Basically use the legitimate Facebook advertising platform to build up the fan base.

      You can start testing with as little as $5 per day to acquire new fans (and I'd recommend starting that low) with a bunch of different campaigns.

      From there if you invest just $20-$30 per day once you know your numbers, within a month or two you can be up to 20k+ fans. The key is to start slow with the ad campaigns, test plenty of ads, different target audiences (with precise interests), know your numbers and scale up from there where appropriate. It's not hard, just a matter of being sensible.

      Also, with the right publishing schedule (to the fan page), you can pull in anywhere from a few hundred to 1k+ visits per day to your website with a fan base of that size (we've been doing that by making just 5 posts per day to the fan page - and it doesn't even have to be your own content). Takes roughly 30 minutes per day to do that, and you can schedule content posting days or weeks in advance (if you're using Wordpress) using free plugins - so you don't have to "baby sit" the content posting every day if you don't want to.

      You can also offset the costs of growing the fan page audience by using strategic placement of AdSense ads and affiliate offers etc. on your actual website. Obviously, the more you can offset the expenditure via revenue generation, the cheaper it is to build up your audience - in the right markets, the cost to build the audience could potentially cover the costs of growing the fan base itself. Again, testing is the key.

      Pretty much every post we make to our blogs get at least 100 "likes" - usually considerably more (some into the thousands - all coming back to our site from the fan page), so that isn't going to "hurt" your SEO at all - in fact, you won't need to do much SEO at all if you're also posting unique content to your blog and it gets that kind of social activity. FYI - that's also without continual ad spend (we just rely on the organic reach of the fan base as it exists - we don't do "boosted posts").

      Ultimately, think of the fan page as a mailing list.

      Once you build the audience, you don't need to spend any additional investment to keep in touch with that list (unless you choose to by boosting posts etc.).

      Basically just keep feeding them appealing content, and they'll keep coming back to your site.

      From there the goal is to get them onto your actual email list, just as a backup (and so you can connect with them when they're not on Facebook and are more responsive to your offers).

      It's a nice approach, because unlike PPC (AdWords etc.) once you've acquired a fan, you can keep putting your content into their newsfeed, so the one time cost to acquire them (whether that's $0.04 per new fan or $0.10 per new fan initially) actually diminishes over time - that is you can keep them coming back for the one time cost. With direct PPC you have to pay to get clicks every time (if they don't opt in).

      Something to consider anyway.

      Best...

      Duncan

      Hi Duncan,

      Thanks for the detailed advice! I actually started advertising on FB yesterday and so far it's like 60c a like. Something I'd obviously like to lower as I cannot see me being able to convert those numbers into a profit.

      Is there any resource or advice you could give me/point in right direction over that?

      Thanks,
      Rwow
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  • Profile picture of the author Collin88
    Neil Patel has this "Advanced guide to content marketing" where he dissects every aspect of content creation and marketing.

    Aside from that I would say that research is a primary aspect...a majority of the blogs that get a huge influx of visitors don't derive it quickly, they get there by posting quality content on a regular basis.

    If you are posting awesome content that people want to share or read about, then they will keep coming back. For eg. Viperchill is an internet marketing blog that I go to read regularly. Why? Because the guy posts content that you fall in love with.

    For writing any post, first thing that needs to go in is research, title is crucial for a post to do will, check for Google trends, search for the same in Google Keyword tool to see what people are searching for and then devise content that people would want to share.

    The outreach can be in the form of emailers, social sharing, paid campaigns, etc
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  • Profile picture of the author dmarc
    You can try to build a presence on twitter. If you have interested, engaged followers, this can be a source of immediate, quality traffic.

    Granted, gaining a substantial number of genuine followers is not a quick process (try to do it too quickly and Twitter may bring down the hammer upon you), but if done right this can be wildly effective.
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  • Profile picture of the author Maximus 357
    Hello Sirs. We have a project of Forex at the moment and are looking for copywriters, who are competent in this topic. If you would like to work in this field, you can send the samples of your articles on the e-mail: maksimko578@gmail.com. You will get a small test from us and if you will fulfill the criterions, you'll get a task for the article.
    The payment will depend on the quantity of characters and it will be paid through Webmoney or PayPal. If the article isn't qualitative, it won't be paid. The size of article should be between 1500 - 5000 characters
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  • Profile picture of the author PolicyMaker
    You need to do bit more work other than just publishing on your website...

    And article syndication is the way to go...for getting traffic to your website...
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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      Originally Posted by PolicyMaker View Post

      You need to do bit more work other than just publishing on your website...

      And article syndication is the way to go...for getting traffic to your website...
      It's something I've looked into. The thing is most of the people I'd like to syndicate and that would attract the appropriate market are my competitors and they aren't likely to syndicate my stuff.

      Rwow
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    You basically write what ever you want. Make sure that your page is optimized with the right keywords. Then when it is ready, you can add that link to your "articles" page.

    Then there is a good chance that Google may pick that up and rank it.

    if it does, then you just need to create new content so that you have more and more pages ranked.
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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      Originally Posted by talfighel View Post

      You basically write what ever you want. Make sure that your page is optimized with the right keywords. Then when it is ready, you can add that link to your "articles" page.

      Then there is a good chance that Google may pick that up and rank it.

      if it does, then you just need to create new content so that you have more and more pages ranked.
      Hi Talfighel,

      Thanks I'm looking to actively market my website as well as rank on Google. I want to have as many different streams of targeted traffic coming in as possible.

      Rwow
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  • Profile picture of the author dcmarketer
    Hey Rwow,

    $0.60 per like is pretty steep. I always aim for $0.10 or lower.

    You can bring that down with better targeting (use precise interests) and run a CPM campaign (not cost per click).

    Keep in mind, if you just started yesterday, FB tends to artificially inflate the first day simply because they're just trying to figure out what works (out of your ads etc.). Cost tends to come down on the second or third day – which is why it’s important to start out slow (I mentioned to cap the campaign at $5 total for the first few days until you have your numbers). Then it’s just a matter of continually testing and tweaking.

    If you want to see exactly what I’ve done with one site I’ve been sharing as a case study, you can check out my signature.

    Otherwise, the social media forum here can help you pick up some good ideas.

    Best...

    Duncan
    Signature

    Pinterest Marketing Blueprint -> http://www.PinterestMarketingBlueprint.com/

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    • Profile picture of the author rwow
      Originally Posted by dcmarketer View Post

      Hey Rwow,

      $0.60 per like is pretty steep. I always aim for $0.10 or lower.

      You can bring that down with better targeting (use precise interests) and run a CPM campaign (not cost per click).

      Keep in mind, if you just started yesterday, FB tends to artificially inflate the first day simply because they're just trying to figure out what works (out of your ads etc.). Cost tends to come down on the second or third day - which is why it's important to start out slow (I mentioned to cap the campaign at $5 total for the first few days until you have your numbers). Then it's just a matter of continually testing and tweaking.

      If you want to see exactly what I've done with one site I've been sharing as a case study, you can check out my signature.

      Otherwise, the social media forum here can help you pick up some good ideas.

      Best...

      Duncan
      Thanks Duncan,

      Will probably check that out when I've got a spare few $. Thanks for your help will try going over to CPM now.

      Rwow
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