New Offline Marketing Pricing Question

12 replies
I am entering into the offline arena and have some pricing questions. I know that different people charge different prices for different services. I'm interested to know what prices you charge for your offline clients.

Any response will be greatly appreciated.

Demond
#marketing #offline #pricing #question
  • Profile picture of the author kemdev
    It really depends on the package you're selling. Usually, when I try to sell anything, I always go for an upsell that complements whatever it is.

    For instance: If you're selling web design, you could offer it to your prospect for a discounted price if they also purchase your SEO work. Because they're in search of the most "bang for their buck," they'll be more likely to get both of your services.

    For general prices, I usually charge:

    300$ for web design.
    800$ for SEO.
    200$ for lead generation setup. (Opt-in)

    And honestly, that's about all I do.

    All the best,

    Jesse Kemmerer
    kemmerer.j@gmail.com
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    • Profile picture of the author MarkR
      Demond,

      I agree, You would have to define your services better to be able to compare prices.

      Take the website for example. Like Jesse, I can throw up a 2-3 page site for $300 - no problem. I've done it before. But is it HTML or WordPress? How many pages? Include on-page SEO? Opt-in form? Flash animation? Who writes the copy? Any custom features? Include stock photo purchase? Custom graphics/layout, or a templated site?

      One issue you're going to face is comparing apples to apples. A site is not a site, just as an "autoresponder service" is not an "autoresponder service". No cookie cutters here.

      You, nor your customer can truly compare pricing until you've got a level playing field. My sites include Robots.txt and sitemap files, custom / on-page SEO, plenty of keyword research, Google Analytics integration, full contact forms, etc. etc. That's why I try to avoid the $300 websites. Most of my 7-10 page sites are $800-$4,000, but have the bells and whistles to be successful, quickly, with organic traffic built-in. But, that may not be what your customer wants or can afford.

      Provide us more details and we'll provide more price points.

      Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author joshril
    $300 for a WP blog that's 2-3 pages makes sense, but it looks like you are selling yourself short.

    I charge:

    $500-$1,000 for opt-in setup ($25-$500/mo for maintenance and newsletters)
    $500 for on-site SEO
    $2,500 for onsite SEO plus social media branding and setup(Twitter, FB, etc.)
    $250-$1,000 for web commercials
    $Free-$5,000 for web design
    $500-$1,000 for an optimized WP blog with SEO plugins and opt-in setup

    Those are the main services, but there are others that I offer... Pricing is not firm. This business is about listening to your prospects and finding out what their problems are. Your job is to come up with the solution. We're problem solvers.

    I've spent the last 8 years in sales, and loving helping small business owners with marketing. Of all of the positions I've had, this one feels truly rewarding! I love seeing the eyes of a business owner light up as you explain everything they could be doing.

    Pick a product or two, market those products heavily, and then cross-sell other products if it's in your client's best interest and truly solves their problems. I very much see this as a needs-based, consultative sale. I think being able to adapt and have some flexibility in your pricing will increase your business and your profits.
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    • Profile picture of the author MarkR
      joshril,

      Thanks, that's good stuff. Fairly close to my rates also.

      I'm interested in how you can price (for example) on-page SEO at a fixed price of $500, when some sites have 5 pages and others have 25 or more. I price it at +-$125/page, but some customers think you're nickel and diming them if you price that way. I've always had a hard time with fixed pricing (relatively undefined) services. Do you have built-in scope limits that always ride alongside those prices?

      I always try to define the total scope up-front, then provide one price for the whole enchilada. That way they can't pick apart the costs for any specific service, and you're services have limits to them.

      Your thoughts?

      Mark
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      • Profile picture of the author joshril
        Great question. I should have given a little more explanation on this... My average pricing for onsite SEO is around $500. Most 3-5 page sites I do in this range, but if a site has multiple pages, I will quote a higher price. I feel like giving a price for the entire job seems to work for me better than a per page fee... Others may have a different opinion on this. I guess I have quasi-fixed pricing model, but each client's situation is a bit different, so the pricing I listed is really more of a guideline than anything.

        As Andrew mentioned above, the pricing should be based on the benefit to the client. I have had a lot of success discussing that I'm offering something that is an investment in the SBO's business and my goal is to get them more money from their customers than they're giving me. In addition, what I do for a business owner can be tracked with raw numbers... results can be a little harder to track with some other forms of "shotgun" marketing.

        Sounds like we're basically doing the same thing, MarkR

        Originally Posted by MarkR View Post

        joshril,

        Thanks, that's good stuff. Fairly close to my rates also.

        I'm interested in how you can price (for example) on-page SEO at a fixed price of $500, when some sites have 5 pages and others have 25 or more. I price it at +-$125/page, but some customers think you're nickel and diming them if you price that way. I've always had a hard time with fixed pricing (relatively undefined) services. Do you have built-in scope limits that always ride alongside those prices?

        I always try to define the total scope up-front, then provide one price for the whole enchilada. That way they can't pick apart the costs for any specific service, and you're services have limits to them.

        Your thoughts?

        Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Demond Jackson
    Thanks for the response and the great ideas. My specialties are web design, wordpress blogs, and seo. What I was thinking about was a basic site setup, with opt in form, and seo as a basic package. With a monthly maintenance fee of $200-$400.
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    Commitment is the difference between people who "have potential" and people who have results.
    Demond Jackson
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  • Profile picture of the author kemdev
    I'll put it this way:

    As long as you can ensure that your customers' results are better than what they put into your services, you can charge anything you'd like.
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  • Profile picture of the author Demond Jackson
    Thanks Jesse, I like and appreciate your perspective.
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    Commitment is the difference between people who "have potential" and people who have results.
    Demond Jackson
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      Generally speaking if you want to make premium fees you'll be customizing what you do to each business you work with and establishing the estimated dollar value of your service to each different client.

      That means the work you do for each client and the dollar value to each client will be very different.

      Different work, different value means different fees.

      I'm not a fan of advertising fixed prices for that reason. I believe your price should be based around the potential profit value of the service you're providing for each specific business.

      When you're starting out that might only be $5,00 to $2,000 but as your skill and experience increases and you're dealing with more successful busineses you might be worth $5,000 to $20,000+ per project.

      I know my answer may not be helpful in terms of getting a comparison but it is important if you want to understand the mindset that allows you to charge higher fees...and be worth those higher fees to a business owner.

      Kindest regards,
      Andrew Cavanagh
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  • Profile picture of the author Demond Jackson
    Thanks for the additional clarification.
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    Commitment is the difference between people who "have potential" and people who have results.
    Demond Jackson
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    • Profile picture of the author MarkR
      Joshril,

      Perfect. Thanks for the clarification. We're very similar in our approach.

      I find that advertising fixed prices might put off those with small sites, and unfairly mislead people with large sites. So, custom scope and custom pricing works for me. And it allows you to price to the market. Local dry cleaners get different / appropriate pricing compared to national , successful, major online retailers and so on.

      Thanks again!

      Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author RockstarBen
    Don't Give it away! It is all in the value you create for your client.

    There are 2 parts to offline consulting:

    1) Lead Generation. Opt-Ins, Autoresponders...

    2) Traffic. Local SEO...

    A full program will generate many business owners several thousand dollars in revenue, if done right. Don't give it away for a couple hundred bucks! Since I employ high-quality, no-nonsense copywriters, I pay good money to get these campaigns going successfully. My clients line up to pay $1,000-$6,000 to set up their campaigns and close to $1,000 per month to manage them. If they were to hire an employee to do it, they would still pay a lot more per month than what I charge. It is a bargain to charge $1,000 a month to help them generate revenue.

    This is why they hire you - to create cash for their business. This is their biggest pain trigger and you are solving it. Of course they will pay you handsomely for it...
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