Dangers of exploring the HEALTH niche!

14 replies
I was addicted to smoking. I am battling insomnia. I still take an average of two bottles of beer per day

Since last year, I have become more committed to my health. I am making some changes, and I am experiencing some benefits. I am studying books on health and improving my diet.

I am considering exploring the health and fitness markets, as an information marketer. Are there risks/gotchas to providing info products on health, when one is not a qualified health practitioner?

How can one legally go around the hurdles?

Thanks
#dangers #exploring #health #niche
  • Profile picture of the author barbling
    This thread and sites might help.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...egalities.html

    Know What You Can

    and when in doubt, go to the source:

    Dietary Supplements

    Hope that helps!
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Barb, great share I'd stress that this is not professional medical advice, somewhere on your blog.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Newman
      Thank you for your help.

      I'd check the links asap.

      I wish you bliss.
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  • Profile picture of the author blueclcl
    I would always practice common sense - Visable disclaimers and so on, and don't make any wild claims ect.

    But, I am not a legal rep or anything, so don't take my word for it!
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  • Profile picture of the author marketingwomen
    Hi Michael! How are you?

    Providing disclaimers and avoiding phony claims will help. Check out ftc.gov (Federal Trade Commission site). The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. That site will provide you with a lot of information to keep you out of trouble. Check out the story below that I found there......


    FTC Obtains $2.2 Million Judgment against Supplement Marketer that Made Phony Claims for Treating and Preventing Diabetes
    FOR RELEASE
    March 7, 2014
    TAGS: deceptive/misleading conduct Internet commerce Over-the-Counter Drugs and Devices Bureau of Consumer Protection Western Region Consumer Protection Advertising and Marketing Advertising and Marketing Basics
    A federal court has found that marketers of bogus remedies for treating and preventing diabetes violated Section 5 of the FTC Act, and has ordered them to pay nearly $2.2 million. The FTC will use the funds it recovers to reimburse consumers.

    The court has prohibited the company – Wellness Support Network Inc. – and its two principals, Robert Held and his daughter Robyn Held, from claiming without rigorous scientific proof that their supplements would treat and prevent diabetes, and from making other deceptive claims.

    “Giving false hope to those who struggle with a serious illness is disgraceful, and the FTC is determined to ensure that deceptive marketers face the consequences,” said Jessica Rich, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.

    The FTC’s case against Wellness Support Network Inc. is part of its ongoing efforts to stop bogus claims that unproven remedies can be used to prevent and treat serious diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

    web page advertising WSN Diabetic Pack as 'Completely natural diabetes breakthrough'
    A representative page from Wellness Support Network's website advertising "Diabetes Breakthrough!" (click to enlarge)
    The FTC’s October 2010 case challenged claims for the defendants’ Diabetic Pack and Insulin Resistance Pack – which contained identical blends of vitamins, minerals, and plant extracts. The defendants touted the Diabetic Pack as a treatment for diabetes, and the Insulin Resistance Pack as a means of purportedly reducing insulin resistance and preventing diabetes. The defendants advertised primarily online, relying heavily on consumer testimonials and running ads that claimed a “Diabetes Breakthrough” and a “clinically proven natural solution to diabetes with a 90% success rate.” The defendants sold the products for $76.70 for a 30-supply supply.

    The court ruled in favor of the FTC’s motion for summary judgment and found that the following claims made by the marketers are false or unsupported by scientific evidence:

    Diabetic Pack is an effective treatment for diabetes, is proven as an effective treatment for diabetes, reduces or eliminates the need for insulin and other diabetic medications, and is proven to cause an average drop in blood glucose levels of 31.9 percent.
    Insulin Resistance Pack reverses and manages insulin resistance, is proven to be an effective treatment for insulin resistance, prevents diabetes, and is proven to cause an average drop in blood glucose levels of 31.9 percent.
    The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California entered the final judgment and order on February 19, 2014.

    The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics. Like the FTC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

    PRESS RELEASE REFERENCE:
    FTC Charges Marketer for Making Phony Claims That Dietary Supplements Can Treat and Prevent Diabetes
    CONTACT INFORMATION
    MEDIA CONTACT:
    Betsy Lordan
    Office of Public Affairs
    202-326-3707

    STAFF CONTACT:
    Laura Fremont, Ken Abbe, Austin Ownbey, and Jake Snow
    Western Region-San Francisco
    415-848-5100

    Talk to you soon!
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  • Originally Posted by Michael Newman View Post

    I was addicted to smoking. I am battling insomnia. I still take an average of two bottles of beer per day

    Since last year, I have become more committed to my health. I am making some changes, and I am experiencing some benefits. I am studying books on health and improving my diet.

    I am considering exploring the health and fitness markets, as an information marketer. Are there risks/gotchas to providing info products on health, when one is not a qualified health practitioner?

    How can one legally go around the hurdles?

    Thanks
    Be careful most countries have Medical/Parma industrial complexes and and are working hard to keep a monopoly so anyone competing is harasses with thousands of laws that "protect" the people. In reality they keep everyone sick but arrest real healers (small timers) because they are endangering people. It's a horrible thing. I got sick and almost dies from the big reputable companies and had to heal myself from small timers of whom had to leave America for "breaking laws".

    It depends if you get on the radar. The laws are such that if they want to get you they have thousands of rules to find one under which to shut you down.

    Good luck.
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    soon people... Relax...
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  • Profile picture of the author ecoverartist
    You also have to be careful if you're marketing in other countries. I once wrote an ebook for someone about treating a specific liver disease. It's possible that the suggestions I outline could relieve the disease and symptoms. However, because this particular ebook was being marketed in Australia, you couldn't write anywhere that it could "cure" something, because it involved specific herbs rather than an approved prescription.
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    • Originally Posted by ecoverartist View Post

      You also have to be careful if you're marketing in other countries. I once wrote an ebook for someone about treating a specific liver disease. It's possible that the suggestions I outline could relieve the disease and symptoms. However, because this particular ebook was being marketed in Australia, you couldn't write anywhere that it could "cure" something, because it involved specific herbs rather than an approved prescription.
      That's what I'm talking about we are no longer free to say even what is true so those who are selling bad medicine don't have to loose marketshare. That is what the law is about it's not to protect people. Medical, health and diet are the worse when it comes to that stuff just be careful.
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      soon people... Relax...
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      • Profile picture of the author Rhadoo7
        What I do is keep a visible note on the footer of my website (visible on all pages and articles) that says "We recommend that you consult with a doctor before beginning any treatment for..."

        I also have a Disclaimer saying something like "The information contained in this website is provided for general informational purposes only! It is not intended as, and should not be relied upon as medical advice! Before you use any of the information provided on this site, you should contact a qualified medical, dietary, fitness or other appropriate professional. If you utilize any information provided in this site, you do so at your own risk and you specifically waive any right to make any claim against ..., its employees or representatives, as the result of the use of such information."
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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    Everybody in this thread means well, but the most important thing you'll need to do is consult with an attorney who specializes in such things.

    There are many pitfalls to this type of marketing, and only an attorney can competently guide you through it.

    I wish you the best of luck... with your health and your marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author lukeblower
    A disclaimer can cover you most of the time. What you need to think about is the relationship with your customers: if you bs. them then they aren't going to stick around very long.

    I've always had issues with dealing with medical issues that I have no experience / persona knowledge about. I wonder how you can really reach out and connect with a prospect if you don't have even an inch of empathy with their issues. Just my personal opinion though.
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  • Profile picture of the author TelZilla
    Never make any claims that you do not have a lot of documented proof on. Other than that, common sense prevails. Unless you're a doctor, don't write as one. Be authentic and if your writing is good, you could gain a following.
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    Don't get so wrapped up in making money that you forget the important things in life.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jtraits
    just go with blogging , share information, give the references that are needed.. make it more like personal instead of business.
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  • Profile picture of the author christophercuna
    As previously mentioned, disclaimers are perfect. Be careful when endorsing health products that can damage a person's health. You'll have to deal with legal issues.

    I'm a smoker myself. I think that's a really awesome niche
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