Long Versus Short WSO Threads?

19 replies
Just wondering how some of you look at WSOs from a customer point of view...

Do any of you bother with reading through REALLY long WSOs? Is it important that a WSO is detailed to you?

I personally like the shorter version but it could be I am lazy to read through the whole thing especially when I see too much fluff and repetition but that could just be me.

Just wondering what the overall feel is for future WSOs which I will write.
#long #short #threads #versus #wso
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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    Originally Posted by Malteaser View Post

    Do any of you bother with reading through REALLY long WSOs?
    I sometimes do, actually. There are a few as long as 10+ pages of which I've read every post (and even a couple several times as long as that).

    Originally Posted by Malteaser View Post

    Is it important that a WSO is detailed to you?
    It's not that, really: it's just that I want to see testimonials from people I've heard of, who have bought and paid for the WSO from that thread, and who have used it and report on their own results.

    And sometimes you have to look a long way for those.
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    • Profile picture of the author Malteaser
      Cool, makes sense, testimonials make sense to me so if a WSO is long for this reason it makes sense and I normally do my due diligence and go through each testimonial.

      However sometimes it is just text... thanks for your input

      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      I sometimes do, actually. There are a few as long as 10+ pages of which I've read every post (and even a couple several times as long as that).



      It's not that, really: it's just that I want to see testimonials from people I've heard of, who have bought and paid for the WSO from that thread, and who have used it and report on their own results.

      And sometimes you have to look a long way for those.
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      • Profile picture of the author wordwizard
        In addition to what Alexa said, you'll also find out a bit about the person who's offering the WSO. How do they respond to questions and pleas for help?

        And you may also find out more about the WSO itself when questions come up.

        Do I read the LOOOONG threads? Sometimes, if the product is something that really interests me and isn't a total no-brainer.

        Another thing I do is check out some of the other posts and/or threads of the person who posted the WSO - for similar reasons. I've neglected to do that a few times, and really regretted it, so now if the poster is relatively new and doesn't have many posts, and if I don't know much about him (or her), I do check out what else they're doing on the WF.
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    • Profile picture of the author twranks
      Personally I find most of those long WSO threads too cheesy and cliche. They usually always tell you that they will give you some "secret to XYZ" or the other, and then you are made to pay for it. The shorter posts are easier for me in all honesty because they usually hit the nail on the head and I can know whether I want the product being offered or not.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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        Originally Posted by twranks View Post

        Personally I find most of those long WSO threads too cheesy and cliche. They usually always tell you that they will give you some "secret to XYZ" or the other
        Are you perhaps confusing "long sales-posts" with "long threads"?
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        • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          Are you perhaps confusing "long sales-posts" with "long threads"?
          Alexa, to be fair, my impression is that the OP was referring to the length of the WSO sales letter rather than the thread itself. In support of that impression, I cite the following post excerpts:

          Originally Posted by Malteaser View Post

          Do any of you bother with reading through REALLY long WSOs? Is it important that a WSO is detailed to you?
          <snip>.
          Just wondering what the overall feel is for future WSOs which I will write.
          And...

          Originally Posted by Malteaser View Post

          Cool, makes sense, testimonials make sense to me so if a WSO is long <snip>
          However sometimes it is just text... thanks for your input


          Either way, I think we've got all bases covered.

          .
          .
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery Moss
    I always read longer posts as they will contain lots of useful information. And, some of these posts are pages long, so I can't imagine how much time it would take for someone to write all that out. And, I feel like the least I can do is take time to read what they've written. And, it's usually worth the time invested.
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    I find that if they don't grab my interest in the first few lines, I won't read the rest of the page. However, if it sounds appealing, I may read it all.
    I do personally hate the long ones though as I feel they're desperately trying to convince us to buy.
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  • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
    Size never matters to me. What matters is:

    1. How interesting the sales copy is to read.

    2. How relevant it is to me (sometimes I'm a dabbler, sometimes hardcore)

    3. If I see any testimonials from people I know and respect who BOUGHT it (review copies mean jack shit to me).

    Basically, say what needs to be said - forget about length. It might be 1 paragraph. Might be 15 pages scrolling.

    I like personality in there. Less hype. Less, not none - get me excited.
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    • Profile picture of the author WilliamPr
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  • Profile picture of the author Malteaser
    Thanks for the input guys! It is nice to get a bit of different ideas so I know how to structure WSOs in future

    To your success!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author James 0
    It should be long or short depending on what you are offering. I think shorter is better because some people may just click away if they see if it's too long.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vid Yo
    If you're going to write a WSO, it helps to know EXACTLY who your target is when deciding to make it long or short. If you're throwing s**t against the wall to see what sticks, a shorter WSO will probably convert better. A longer version may help to show them your WSO is actually NOT what they need.

    For me, the longer the better. WHY? Because I'm trying to allow the seller to talk me out of buying it. (My personal issue, not the seller's/yours).

    Longer is better if it's targeted to a specific audience. If I ask myself "What is the best way to stay focused today?" before getting online, then once on, I see a WSO titled "The best way to stay focused today!", I will read each word and yearn for more.

    Laser-focused target marketing is key!
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  • Profile picture of the author gluckspilz
    To be honest, I just scroll down to the 3rd or 4th post and start reading the reviews. Reviews from real buyers are always good to look out for since they were never ask to leave a review (Or not suppose to anyway)
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    • Profile picture of the author vickybabe
      In the case of the actual sales copy, i write them myself and i always find the shorter the better (in my personal opinion) i just tell them what what i have, if you want it you want it, if not, nothing i can do about it hey

      In the case of really long threads, i find that price really reflects on whether i read every post or not (sometimes ten pages)

      If the price is only $7, i generally read the first page, if it is $47 i will read the whole thread

      Some food for thought,

      All depends on individual experiences i suppose
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    • Profile picture of the author MNord
      Originally Posted by gluckspilz View Post

      To be honest, I just scroll down to the 3rd or 4th post and start reading the reviews. Reviews from real buyers are always good to look out for since they were never ask to leave a review (Or not suppose to anyway)
      This is a good insight into how long-form direct response copy works. Top copywriters don't necessarily expect buyers to read all--or even most--of their copy. They know many people will tend to skim, jump to the end, skip whole sections etc.

      People who are convinced before reaching the end of the sales letter will typically skip to the end and hit the buy button (or whatever, depending on the medium--maybe they dial the 800 number). Others may read the whole thing. But the point is: If you don't put a selling point into the letter, the buyer won't see it. If you put it in and it doesn't get read, it probably didn't hurt anything.

      I think that if copywriters could predict with great accuracy what exactly buyers would want to read before actually buying, sales copy would be a lot shorter . Since they can't predict it, they have to stuff a whole bunch of stuff in there to make sure the correct buying triggers get hit.
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  • Profile picture of the author NK
    Depends on what the offer is, sometimes I feel the WSO copy is too short while other times it's just way too long. It's hard to strike a balance since everyone will have a different opinion so it could take only a few words to persuade person A while it would take a whole essay to explain why person B needs what you have.

    That said, you should know who are the vast majority of your target market are and figure out just how much you need to convince them. The responses on the thread will do the rest.
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  • Profile picture of the author Samuel Adams
    I like to study the longer WSO threads and try to learn something new about how other people market their products. There's so much you can learn from these sales threads, things you might not have considered using or words to describe a product you might not have considered saying. Even if you don't buy the product, you still have gained something of value.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Blades
    Long Versus Short WSO Threads?
    Thanks for the input guys! It is nice to get a bit of different ideas so I know how to structure WSOs in future

    To your success!!!
    I'm guessing the OP meant the sales copy. To answer that question, it depends on what the vendor is selling. Sometimes the product speaks for itself, and other times, the vendor has to do alot of talking for the product.

    From my experience as a buyer, I noticed that alot of the crap products that don't work, requires alot of sales copy to divert the buyers attention away from the actual product.

    I think actual demonstrations work better than long ass sales copy. People want to know 'DOES IT WORK" not read a bunch of gibberish and hype.



    As far as reviews go, there needs to be a rule, where people who do not buy that particular product, should not be allowed to stop by the thread to kiss ass. Sometimes you have to read through 3 pages just to get to the real reviews.

    IMO, there is only one reason for super long sales copy, and that is to try and hypnotize people into buying

    Every single day vendors sell millions of units, with a 30 second commercial. If you need a sales page as long as a 50 page ebook, then you are trying too hard
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  • Profile picture of the author Marco Moeschter
    It depends on the sales letter. Normally I just scrolling down to see the main bullet points and how it can help me. But sometimes when the sales letter is good and the story caught's my attention (without all the hype, I don't like that) than I going to read the whole thing. But that happens to often because most sales letter just to similar to each other.
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