NEW Online Selling Regulations (EU) From Friday

9 replies
You may already know this, but just in case...

As of Friday 13th June the Consumer Rights Directive is implemented and will impact all EU and UK e-commerce websites and covers both physical and downloadable products.

'The regulations aim to strengthen consumer rights when shopping online. The directive also aims to align the laws of EU member states. One example of the change to the regulations is the right to cancel and the seller's duty to inform. If your shop doesn't comply with these new regulations after the 13th June, you will be liable for this and run a risk of facing legal action.'

Consumer Contracts White Paper

It may be worth taking a look, the white paper is free to download.
#friday #online #regulations #selling
  • Profile picture of the author melprise
    Well, the stated aim may be to help consumers, but as always with government, the actual agenda may be something else. See the following post that spells out the changes, instead of demanding an opt-in to get the info:

    Consumer Contract Regulations - Publications - News & Knowledge - Reed Smith
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  • Profile picture of the author LynnM
    Didn't want to sign up for the paper, so found another link here.
    Seems like if you have a buy button then the wording needs to be changed (section f), and for digital content, there are more rules to come.

    edit: posted same time as melprise, same link!
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  • Profile picture of the author ganesh
    Thanks for the share. I went through it. It is stated that “digital content must satisfy a minimum standard similar to physical goods – it must be of satisfactory quality, fit for its purpose and meet its description.”

    Who will verify the quality and decide if it is fit for its purpose? It is not going to be an easy task.
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    • Profile picture of the author melprise
      Originally Posted by ganesh View Post

      Thanks for the share. I went through it. It is stated that “digital content must satisfy a minimum standard similar to physical goods – it must be of satisfactory quality, fit for its purpose and meet its description.”

      Who will verify the quality and decide if it is fit for its purpose? It is not going to be an easy task.
      That's how the camel gets its nose in the tent. Create a vague standard that implies government jurisdiction, then use it as a pretext to create bureaucracies that will determine what gets verified (eventually, perhaps via licensing sellers), and to enforce the regs. That looks like the actual agenda.
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  • Profile picture of the author thedark
    They trying to put regulations to something they do not understand. Then they wonder why the unemployment rate is so high in Europe.
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    • Originally Posted by thedark View Post

      They trying to put regulations to something they do not understand. Then they wonder why the unemployment rate is so high in Europe.
      After 7000 new regulations a politically "respected" European told me that the problem in Europe is we are not well regulated like in America. I didn't want to say anything since he was already brainwashed to much.
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      soon people... Relax...
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  • Profile picture of the author SarahStoke
    Reluctant to download and trawl through the white paper.

    Found a bullet point version of some of the main changes here. The law covers a number of areas such as:

    • Customers must inform you of the fact that they intend to use their right to cancel within 14 days.
    • Different types of goods may have different cancellation policies e.g. the cancellation process for goods sent by parcel service will be different from those used for downloadable products.
    • For a number of product groups, a right to cancel is no longer granted for the consumer e.g. particular wines.
    • In future, sellers will be able to pass the return costs arising as a result of cancellation onto the consumer, no matter what the price of the product.
    • In the event of a cancellation, delivery costs will need to be refunded. However in the instance where a customer expressly chooses to use an express delivery this rule does not apply. You will only need to refund the delivery cost up to the amount of the standard delivery costs offered by your shop.
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  • Profile picture of the author Katie Rich
    Not quite correct Sarah.
    The purchaser has 14 days (previously 7 days) to decide to cancel a contract or return purchased goods and another 14 days to return the goods. The seller then has to refund within 14 days from knowing this, whether they have received the returned goods or not. The refund must include the original delivery standard charge but not necessarily the return costs if this was stated prior to purchase.

    The directive bans all hidden fees and charges, with sellers obliged to give all price information upfront. Plus there is be a ban on traders pre-ticking boxes for additional purchases. Customers cannot be charged for any item that was selected for them as part of that purchasing process, rather than the purchaser actively choosing to add it to their basket.

    Information on the compatibility of digital content with hardware and other software also has to be provided. There are also specific provisions for digital content.

    The seller must not supply digital content, such as music or software downloads, within the 14 day cancellation period, unless the consumer has given their express consent to this happening.

    It's sort of a minefield as each European Union country also has their own regulations as part of the directive.
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