Do you promote $7 100% commission reports?

38 replies
I've read in lots of places that "people love promoting $7 reports where they get 100% commission instantly". OK, so it doesn't have to be $7 but let's say reports in the $7-$10 region with 100% commission.

On the other hand I've seen tons of people saying they'd never promote anything that had a commission less than $20 or so.

So ladies and gents ....

Have you promoted this kind of price point product?

Would you?

If so, would it only be under particular circumstances?

If not, why not? Is it the commission isn't high enough or another objection?


Cheers,

Andy
#100% #commission #page not found #promote #reports
  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    Hi Andy,

    It depends on who you talk to. I know a lot of people that promote to make $7 sales daily, especially if there's an OTO with it. They have a responsive list that will quickly buy a good product at that price.

    A lot of people don't want to waste time with something like this, but sales are sales. It's all in the market you are working with, but the concept has made a lot of people some very good money and built some solid lists of buyers. With the 100% commissions, that what you should be focused on.

    If it's any help, I know of some big name marketers that do this for a quick cash infusion. They evidently think it worthwhile. I think it's because it fills in the blanks between high dollar items, but most of them have a list for that too.

    Like anything, research your market and give it a whirl.

    Thanks,

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author TLTheLiberator
    Yes I have promoted $7 products. ( non IM )

    A $7 product with a good sales page and targeted presold visitors can convert at 4-7% vs. a $20 product that converts at 1% since $7 is a drop in the bucket for most people.

    It can be a lot more money with the same amount of visitors.

    Hope This Helps!!

    TL
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    • Profile picture of the author JamesPenn
      Originally Posted by TLTheLiberator View Post

      Yes I have promoted $7 products. ( non IM )

      A $7 product with a good sales page and targeted presold visitors can convert at 4-7% vs. a $20 product that converts at 1% since $7 is a drop in the bucket for most people.

      It can be a lot more money with the same amount of visitors.

      Hope This Helps!!

      TL
      I think conversions can even go higher than that. One of my affiliates managed a 10.19% conversion, and he generated over 100 sales. So the data is pretty significant.

      Another one managed a 9% conversion and that was with about 60 sales.

      This is for a $10 product by the way.

      Andy...

      This is a fantastic business model. Create a hot report, create a killer sales letter, develop a cash producing autoresponder sequence for your buyers, and get loads of affiliates.

      If you can offer a OTO too and pay affiliates 50% on that, then it's even easier to persuade them to do a promo for you.

      James
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
    Thanks John,

    Any recommendations for going about finding those big name markets that do this?

    Would you be able to put me in touch with any of them?

    Cheers,

    Andy
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  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    Andy,

    I would love to, but it wouldn't be appropriate. Quite a few are members here, so perhaps they will weigh in.

    Thanks,

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
    Originally Posted by Razer Rage View Post

    It's quite simple really: Offer 100% instant commissions, and then sell the darn thing for $20+.

    That ought to take care of any "bare minimum" affiliates.
    But the whole point of what I'm doing is selling the reports at a very cheap price point to maximise sales and build a large buyers list. I was aiming for $7-$10 for the price point. I'd think charging $20 would significantly reduce purchases.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
    Thanks James. Really appreciate your thoughts in this thread and my other one. I'll definitely be in touch once I've got something together.

    Cheers,

    Andy
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  • Profile picture of the author Roger Mayne
    Maybe I'm wrong, but surely it depends on the product and the sales page, and not necessarily the price?

    If the product is of good quality and there is a buying market for it, and the conversion rate is good, then that is a better reason to promote it in my opinion.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Grossman
    I would never promote a 100% commission product, unless it was only 100% commission on the first period of a subscription.

    The fact that the author is paying you 100% of what the customer paid means the book itself isn't a great product in and of itself, but primarily an ad to sell something else.

    And I do have a problem with selling people ads. They can get plenty of that for free.
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
      Originally Posted by swiftdeal View Post

      Maybe I'm wrong, but surely it depends on the product and the sales page, and not necessarily the price?

      If the product is of good quality and there is a buying market for it, and the conversion rate is good, then that is a better reason to promote it in my opinion.
      Thanks. That would be my opinion but being a more technical and less marketing mindset I tend to find that my way of looking at the world often doesn't line up with other people's.

      And on that note ...

      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      I would never promote a 100% commission product, unless it was only 100% commission on the first period of a subscription.

      The fact that the author is paying you 100% of what the customer paid means the book itself isn't a great product in and of itself, but primarily an ad to sell something else.

      And I do have a problem with selling people ads. They can get plenty of that for free.
      Thanks Dan. I've got a different take on this one, so I hope you get a chance to revisit this thread and discuss.

      The whole point of offering a low end item for 100% commission for me would be to make it as absolutely high quality as I possibly can. The goal is to make people associate these reports and my products with quality so they buy from me again (the whole point of giving away 100% in the first place).

      Is this a blanket policy for you or are you speaking in general terms with exceptions where the product and sales material is high enough quality?

      Cheers,

      Andy
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    • Profile picture of the author JamesPenn
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      I would never promote a 100% commission product, unless it was only 100% commission on the first period of a subscription.

      The fact that the author is paying you 100% of what the customer paid means the book itself isn't a great product in and of itself, but primarily an ad to sell something else.

      And I do have a problem with selling people ads. They can get plenty of that for free.
      I don't think that's fair.

      The purpose of selling a 100% commission product is because it gets people into your sales funnel.

      Customers are not going to spend any more money with you if their first purchase is crap. For that reason, my 100% commission reports are some of my best content.

      Maybe you've had some bad experiences, but don't label all 100% commission products with the same brush.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Taylor
      Dan,

      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      The fact that the author is paying you 100% of what the customer paid means the book itself isn't a great product in and of itself, but primarily an ad to sell something else.
      You can't be serious! (Said with Jimmy Connors voice)

      The fact that the author is paying you 100% means just that. The
      author is forgoing all the income from the sale as an incentive to his
      affiliates to promote his product. There is no way of inferring that a
      100% commission is connected with the quality of a product.

      In fact, in my experience, the reverse is often true. The quality of
      many products sold through the $7 script or RAP has been much
      better than some things I've seen being sold by so called gurus.

      Remember, it is likely to be the first product that a customer sees
      from the vendor and, therefore, it's the product that sets the
      benchmark and creates the vital first impression.

      John
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
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      • Profile picture of the author Dan Grossman
        Originally Posted by alexa_s View Post

        If the only commercial value to its publisher is in the upsell, then it will have to be a particularly good product, to bring in reliable re-orders from the same source.
        It's particularly good advertising, doesn't imply that much about the first product the customer paid for.

        I know I'll never win this argument in this forum.

        Back to filming .
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        • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
          Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

          It's particularly good advertising, doesn't imply that much about the first product the customer paid for.

          I know I'll never win this argument in this forum.

          Back to filming my squirrel buddy.
          Hi Dan,

          I agree with you 100%. You're never going to convert the masses on Warrior but I'm genuinely really interested in your point of view.

          I have a lot of respect for you and your business sense. Your War Room post about your Wordpress Plugin and associated sales and marketing strategy is directly responsible for a lot of money in my pocket.

          If you have the time I'd be really interested in you sharing where these views come from and some more in depth thoughts on the subject. Please feel free to make it a PM if you're done with the thread.

          Thank you,

          Andy

          PS: The squirrel is awesome. I keep trying to film our one in the backgarden but he seems to be camera shy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Didier Faucher
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      The fact that the author is paying you 100% of what the customer paid means the book itself isn't a great product in and of itself, but primarily an ad to sell something else.
      Dan, I don't get the reasoning behind that. :confused:
      Maybe you got bad experience with your purchases?

      Yes, some "100% commission" products are crap, but some others are of (very) good quality.

      Just few examples:
      Rapid Action Profits script (Sid Hale)
      $7 Secrets system (Jonathan Leger / Don Morris)
      Easy WP Affiliate (John Taylor)
      Fool Proof Profits (John Ritskowitz)
      From Hobby To Your Own Profitable Home-Based How-To Business Empire (Kevin Riley)
      Mini Video Funnel (Frank Bruno)
      etc.

      (I won't cite mine. )

      I spent 70+ hours researching original products that pay "100% affiliate commission"(*) (directory will be available in few days). I found 350+, and can assure you that many are both useful and of good quality.

      Hope you change your mind about them. Or try to investigate a bit more?

      As usual, there's no simple answer as "yes or no". It depends on the product, and many other parameters.

      Didier

      (*): In fact many don't pay 100% commission on all sales, but 100% commission on 50% (or 25%, or 75%, etc.) of sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
    Could I request that people reply with their associated experiences of 100% commission products as well please?

    I sense there is a certain amount of bias on both sides of the fence here so it'd be good to see where those opinions have come from.

    Cheers,

    Andy
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  • Profile picture of the author ahlexis
    Most of the people who say they would never sell on a 100% commission are missing the point. The purpose of 100% commission reports is not sales! The purpose of 100% commission is leveraging other people's lists! Each of the people who buy the report from someone else is paying that other person for the privilege of ending up on YOUR LIST.

    Once on YOUR LIST from a good report, now you have ample opportunities to generate sales at higher price points from people who started out on other people's lists. And because of the 100% commission, you get your name in front of a much larger audience.

    And besides, I'd rather have a list of BUYERS than a list of potential buyers any day!
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
      Originally Posted by ahlexis View Post

      Most of the people who say they would never sell on a 100% commission are missing the point. The purpose of 100% commission reports is not sales! The purpose of 100% commission is leveraging other people's lists! Each of the people who buy the report from someone else is paying that other person for the privilege of ending up on YOUR LIST.

      Once on YOUR LIST from a good report, now you have ample opportunities to generate sales at higher price points from people who started out on other people's lists. And because of the 100% commission, you get your name in front of a much larger audience.

      And besides, I'd rather have a list of BUYERS than a list of potential buyers any day!
      Thanks. What is your experience of 100% commission products? Have you ever promoted them or sold them in this way to build a list?

      I'm particularly interested to hear some "case studies" (ok, case studies is too grand a term, but a few lines would be nice) if people have time.

      Cheers,

      Andy
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  • Profile picture of the author Harry Behrens
    I see a lot of $7 reports being offered at the "confirm" and "thank you" pages of people's newsletters. I guess the logic is that if they've just signed up to your newsletter, in other words taken a small action of confidence in you, then it's much easier for them to progress to the next small action, buying a cheap report. After the $7 you can have an upsell to a bigger product and continue the "Scaling" process, getting people to spend a little more gradually.

    I've also seen offers which list 4-5 different $7 reports that complement each other, and it's not hard to imagine that some people might buy all of them at once.

    So it's all about the ways you can come up with to market them.
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  • Profile picture of the author ragstworiches
    In my experience promoting low cost products is more difficult if you are trying to recruit affiliates, that said I have lots of people on my list who will not overspend on a product. So I try to balance it so the affiliates make what they want and my customers are not paying more than something is worth.

    The best tactic would be to have a variety of products some high end, some medium and some low.

    I don't believe in pricing ridiculously high unless it is a quality product. I am more on the side of giving quality info for free or at a fair price.

    Phil
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  • Profile picture of the author John Taylor
    Andy,

    A while back I created a series of high quality
    reports each dedicated to a specific specialist
    niche market within a broader market.

    By creating targeted high quality products, I
    was quickly able to establish my credibilty and
    expertise within the market. More importantly,
    I was able to leverage the reach of the already
    established experts in the market place who
    were quite happy to promote my reports for
    100% commissions.

    Those reports are still generating sales and I
    now have a very strong lead in that market,
    thanks to the efforts of my competitors.

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author Tyrus Antas
    I wouldn't. It simple isn't enough money for me to bother with. However there's many blogger types out there who are absolutely starved to make a quick buck. If the product is targeted I'm pretty sure they'd be willing to promote.

    Tyrus
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
      Originally Posted by Tyrus Antas View Post

      I wouldn't. It simple isn't enough money for me to bother with. However there's many blogger types out there who are absolutely starved to make a quick buck. If the product is targeted I'm pretty sure they'd be willing to promote.

      Tyrus
      Would you mind elaborating a bit on how you go about promoting products that makes this the case. I would assume that for most people their interest is in $/click, with the absolute value of a single sale irrelevant.

      Viewing it in absolute terms like this suggests to me that you have a far specialised approach that results in less sales but far better for promoting high ticket priced items. Am I way off base here? Either way I'd like to hear your thoughts.

      Cheers,

      Andy
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    • Profile picture of the author Didier Faucher
      Originally Posted by Tyrus Antas View Post

      I wouldn't. It simple isn't enough money for me to bother with.
      So you promote products only to make money, and not to help your
      prospects/customers? :p

      I wouldn't promote a low or average quality product just because I get
      $200 per sale.

      On the other side, I would not hesitate to promote a product that make
      me only $1 in affiliate commission if I know it will help my subscribers/customers.

      But that's just me.


      Originally Posted by Andy Fletcher View Post

      Would you mind elaborating a bit on how you go about promoting products that makes this the case.
      As a product owner, you have to use $7 Secrets or RAP script.
      You submit your product to the blog owner.
      They accept it (or not).
      They post the offer on their blogs and send emails to their lists (using their affiliate link).

      As an affiliate, you simply append your PayPal email address ($7 Secrets script)
      or affiliate ID (RAP script) to the products URL and promote them your own way.

      But I'm not sure that's what Tyrus was talking about.


      Didier
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      • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
        Originally Posted by Didier Faucher View Post

        As a product owner, you have to use $7 Secrets or RAP script.
        You submit your product to the blog owner.
        They accept it (or not).
        They post the offer on their blogs and send emails to their lists (using their affiliate link).

        As an affiliate, you simply append your PayPal email address ($7 Secrets script)
        or affiliate ID (RAP script) to the products URL and promote them your own way.

        But I'm not sure that's what Tyrus was talking about.


        Didier
        Thanks Didier. I appreciate the step-by-step but that's not quite what I meant. I'm familiar with RAP and $7 script. What I meant was his methods of promotion that make it unrealistic to promote a product that produces a $10 commission.

        I'm presuming he must take a more personalised approach, which results in closing more sales but doesn't scale as well as a mailing list/blog etc and thus doesn't work for low ticket items. I'm just guessing though and he could just have something against low price points, hence the question.

        Cheers,

        Andy
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  • Profile picture of the author Didier Faucher
    edit above:
    350+ unique products -> 350+ original products (RR/PLR products excluded)
    (unique products: maybe 1500+ pay instant commissions)

    Didier
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  • Profile picture of the author Harry Behrens
    About the quality being low or selling an ad: This is absolutely something that goes on a case-by-case basis. I've seen $7 products that were worth their kilobytes in gold (actually I've seen products given away for free for list-building, that were worth that) and I've seen others that were obvious ads and teases for a coaching or membership program.

    I know at least a couple gurus whose method is to genuinely give away their actual real techniques, secrets and information for free or extremely cheap and then charge people for coaching programs in which they take you by the hand and support you. And they do well with it.

    So, there is no way to claim or know something like that aside from having read the report OR knowing the person behind the report and their reputation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt Henninger
    Originally Posted by Andy Fletcher View Post

    I've read in lots of places that "people love promoting $7 reports where they get 100% commission instantly". OK, so it doesn't have to be $7 but let's say reports in the $7-$10 region with 100% commission.

    On the other hand I've seen tons of people saying they'd never promote anything that had a commission less than $20 or so.

    So ladies and gents ....

    Have you promoted this kind of price point product?

    Would you?

    If so, would it only be under particular circumstances?

    If not, why not? Is it the commission isn't high enough or another objection?


    Cheers,

    Andy
    I wouldn't promote someone else's $7 product and here is why.

    Often the $7 product, while alot of them are good, are there increase trust with the buyer, therefore warming them up to their own higher priced offer.

    The conversion numbers for the higher priced product go WAY up when the person gets the $7 product and is impressed.

    Its actually not that hard to make your own $7 product, a simple hour long interview with an "expert" would qualify for a $7 product.
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
      Originally Posted by Kurt Henninger View Post

      I wouldn't promote someone else's $7 product and here is why.

      Often the $7 product, while alot of them are good, are there increase trust with the buyer, therefore warming them up to their own higher priced offer.

      The conversion numbers for the higher priced product go WAY up when the person gets the $7 product and is impressed.

      Its actually not that hard to make your own $7 product, a simple hour long interview with an "expert" would qualify for a $7 product.
      Thanks Kurt but I don't really understand what you're saying. You wouldn't promote it because the product owner is going to sell them something else?

      Could you elaborate please?

      Cheers,

      Andy

      PS: I appear to have said "Thanks" too many times in this thread, there's no button for it on your post. Don't want anyone thinking I've stopped being grateful!
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    • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
      Hi Kurt,

      I think your logic is somewhat flawed...
      Originally Posted by Kurt Henninger View Post

      I wouldn't promote someone else's $7 product and here is why.

      Often the $7 product, while alot of them are good, are there increase trust with the buyer, therefore warming them up to their own higher priced offer.

      The conversion numbers for the higher priced product go WAY up when the person gets the $7 product and is impressed.
      ...and if your affiliate link was cookied when you promoted the $7 product, it will still be there (assuming the the same domain) when the backend offer is promoted directly by the merchant. If the merchant is promoting with a "raw" link, your cookie should allow you to get credit for the backend sale.

      If you're concerned about relying on your cookie to create sales on the backend...
      promote the merchant's backend product, too. Use your affiliate link, and remind your readers about the frontend product you mailed them about earlier.
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  • Profile picture of the author ragnartm
    If the report is more than worth it, you can gain trust by sending them to it so I don't really see the issue.
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
      Originally Posted by Sid Hale View Post

      Hi Kurt,

      I think your logic is somewhat flawed...

      ...and if your affiliate link was cookied when you promoted the $7 product, it will still be there (assuming the the same domain) when the backend offer is promoted directly by the merchant. If the merchant is promoting with a "raw" link, your cookie should allow you to get credit for the backend sale.

      If you're concerned about relying on your cookie to create sales on the backend...
      promote the merchant's backend product, too. Use your affiliate link, and remind your readers about the frontend product you mailed them about earlier.
      Thanks Sid. I'm not sure if he had issues with it on a technical level or just some aversion to the product creator making money by selling his leads something else afterwards.

      Originally Posted by ragnartm View Post

      If the report is more than worth it, you can gain trust by sending them to it so I don't really see the issue.
      Thanks. Have you promoted products in this way before?
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      • Profile picture of the author Sid Hale
        Yeah, I know Andy, and...
        Originally Posted by Andy Fletcher View Post

        Thanks Sid. I'm not sure if he had issues with it on a technical level or just some aversion to the product creator making money by selling his leads something else afterwards.
        That's why I felt compelled to clarify that there are ways for the affiliate to make money on the backend product(s).

        It ALWAYS behooves the merchant to be totally transparent about 1) his plans for backend promotions, 2) the use of cookies by his affiliate program, and 3) the ability of affiliates to promote other products - but what I outlined is the way MOST affiliate programs will work.

        If, on the other hand, he is promoting the stance that the affiliate should, instead, create his own $7 product - fine. But then the affiliate becomes the merchant (which may/may not be what he desires), and the arguments given are addressing a totally different topic.
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        • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
          Originally Posted by Sid Hale View Post

          Yeah, I know Andy, and...

          That's why I felt compelled to clarify that there are ways for the affiliate to make money on the backend product(s).

          It ALWAYS behooves the merchant to be totally transparent about 1) his plans for backend promotions, 2) the use of cookies by his affiliate program, and 3) the ability of affiliates to promote other products - but what I outlined is the way MOST affiliate programs will work.

          If, on the other hand, he is promoting the stance that the affiliate should, instead, create his own $7 product - fine. But then the affiliate becomes the merchant (which may/may not be what he desires), and the arguments given are addressing a totally different topic.
          Thanks Sid, that makes sense. Also, just like to note what a huge RAP fan I am. So thanks for that also
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  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    Andy,

    I think John summed it up well with how a well thought strategy works for making money both short term and long. It's not the process, but how you use it. He is speaking from the success of it, your case study.

    Also, don't be fooled where Sid is concerned. Just because he is the developer of RAP, he is also one sharp marketer. The RAP features were born out of a marketing need to sell and manage affiliates. Why? Because it works.

    I said it before, there are a lot of people who have made a lot of money doing exactly what you are talking about. Do your homework on your market, develop a quality product and go for it.

    Thanks,

    John
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    • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
      Originally Posted by globalpro View Post

      Andy,

      I think John summed it up well with how a well thought strategy works for making money both short term and long. It's not the process, but how you use it. He is speaking from the success of it, your case study.

      Also, don't be fooled where Sid is concerned. Just because he is the developer of RAP, he is also one sharp marketer. The RAP features were born out of a marketing need to sell and manage affiliates. Why? Because it works.

      I said it before, there are a lot of people who have made a lot of money doing exactly what you are talking about. Do your homework on your market, develop a quality product and go for it.

      Thanks,

      John
      Thanks John. That seems to be the general consensus. I'm really looking forward to trying this model out. I feel I have a decent knowledge of marketing software products (particularly monthly web services) but this is really outside my comfort zone, which I find is the most productive place I can put myself.

      Cheers,

      Andy
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