Anyone making big bucks outside of the "big 3" niches?

13 replies
I'm not in 1 of the "big 3" niches (weight loss/health, make money/IM, dating/relationships).

I haven't lost weight or achieved my ideal fitness level, so I'm not in a position to tell people how to do that.

I haven't made big money so I'm not in a position to tell people how to do that.

I'm married and could probably give advice on marriage, but I think my wife would prefer me to keep that part of our lives private. Can't really offer dating advice for obvious reasons.

THEREFORE...

I'm trying to enter and brand myself in a hobby niche..."learn guitar." I know how to play guitar and could teach it.

It's hard to find advice from people who are making money from hobby niches.

Just a curious question...who all on here is in a hobby niche and outside of the big 3 and making decent money?? By decent I mean over $100K/year.

I'm just struggling with this inner question right now of what market I should enter that will produce the financial goals I'm striving for. Getting a bit frustrated with this inner dialogue.

Thanks for any input
#big #big 3 #bucks #hobby niche #making #niche markets #niches
  • Profile picture of the author jbyte
    Can you create videos of you teaching guitar? If you can, you can create a membership site that provides lessons online.
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  • Profile picture of the author JensSteyaert
    I agree stic to what you know and teach people how to learn guitar, maybe you can create a product or launch a membership site etc.

    If you have the skill to teach people something you know, there are multiple options you can follow. Youtube would be a good way to promote your product by offering free lessons and then redirect people to your main product.
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  • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
    Sure - in a few different niches outside of the "Big 3" you list above.

    I have also worked with some some people in hobby niches, including the instructional "play guitar" area.

    What you are up against here is is significant instructional content available on YouTube at no cost. Admittedly not all of it is good, and it can be a pain to sort through at times, but there is a good deal of info available.

    How you can counter that with an instructional product - video is most likely your best bet - is:

    1. Sub-niche - focus on specific styles - ex Jazz, blues, classical, hard-rock, etc...seek to become the dominant teacher in a given style since that is what 99% of the guitar players out there seek to be is to get started, advance or become an expert in one style. This will make it easier for you to reach your customers

    2. Organize a program that quickly ramps someone from beginner (or a basic level) to the point where they can play songs (or parts of songs) they will relate to...Ex. 6-weeks to playing X, Y or Z song. This sets you aside from one lesson or another found on YouTube

    3. Assuming you get the product down, marketing is very important in this space - you want to figure out early on - do you want to cater to affiliates who will reach your market or do you want to become well connected yourself (through advanced marketing) to reach your customers...either way can work, but this is critical to reaching and becoming branded within your niche

    Yes, there is money in this niche for sure,the fact that aligns with your passion/interest is a solid first step - what's left is to put together an attractive/differentiated offering and then learn to market either through affiliates or direct to consumer.

    Jeff
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    • Profile picture of the author BrandonLB
      Originally Posted by jbsmith View Post

      Sure - in a few different niches outside of the "Big 3" you list above.

      I have also worked with some some people in hobby niches, including the instructional "play guitar" area.

      What you are up against here is is significant instructional content available on YouTube at no cost. Admittedly not all of it is good, and it can be a pain to sort through at times, but there is a good deal of info available.

      How you can counter that with an instructional product - video is most likely your best bet - is:

      1. Sub-niche - focus on specific styles - ex Jazz, blues, classical, hard-rock, etc...seek to become the dominant teacher in a given style since that is what 99% of the guitar players out there seek to be is to get started, advance or become an expert in one style. This will make it easier for you to reach your customers

      2. Organize a program that quickly ramps someone from beginner (or a basic level) to the point where they can play songs (or parts of songs) they will relate to...Ex. 6-weeks to playing X, Y or Z song. This sets you aside from one lesson or another found on YouTube

      3. Assuming you get the product down, marketing is very important in this space - you want to figure out early on - do you want to cater to affiliates who will reach your market or do you want to become well connected yourself (through advanced marketing) to reach your customers...either way can work, but this is critical to reaching and becoming branded within your niche

      Yes, there is money in this niche for sure,the fact that aligns with your passion/interest is a solid first step - what's left is to put together an attractive/differentiated offering and then learn to market either through affiliates or direct to consumer.

      Jeff

      Thanks Jeff, funny thing...I already run a jazz guitar blog (jazzguitartips.com). The problem is (or at least in my mind) is that I started this blog as a "journey to learning jazz guitar" type of blog, with the intention of offering an instructional product when I got good enough and learned enough. I'm not good enough in jazz yet.

      I know how to play rock & blues pretty solid, but I'm still learning jazz. There are already a handful of formally trained jazz guitarists out there offering a ton of solid information for free on YouTube and their websites, and I am intimidated by that.

      I was thinking of starting a new site/blog and catering to the rock/blues crowd since I know that better. But you're right. All the free content intimidates me. Justinguitar.com offers a gazillion good videos on YouTube for free! And it's good stuff!

      It's frustrating when I think about trying to compete with that. I know that if I build solid relationships with an audience they would still buy my products, but I guess I'm just wondering if there's going to be enough money in it in the end, or I should just go and try to sell T-shirts with Facebook ads or something.

      Lots of thinking out loud here...sorry.
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      • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
        Yep - if you know Rock/Blues - then stick to that for sure.

        Fact is that any niche worthwhile getting into will be competitive (both in terms of free material as well as other paid options) - that's where you need to need to get to know the market better and put your critical hat on to uncover what is missing with existing material.

        Perhaps linking specific lessons around a well known song is a unique way to teach - instead of just a "learn to play this song" video or just a video teaching chords or scales - you have videos that teach two or three fundamentals that lead to how to play a certain song.

        Think in terms of if I want X and I see Y out there - what can I do (Z) that will improve or be perceived as better?

        Then it comes to marketing - having a better sales letter, better content, better ads, better list, etc... can all make a massive difference

        Jeff

        Originally Posted by BrandonLB View Post

        Thanks Jeff, funny thing...I already run a jazz guitar blog (jazzguitartips.com). The problem is (or at least in my mind) is that I started this blog as a "journey to learning jazz guitar" type of blog, with the intention of offering an instructional product when I got good enough and learned enough. I'm not good enough in jazz yet.

        I know how to play rock & blues pretty solid, but I'm still learning jazz. There are already a handful of formally trained jazz guitarists out there offering a ton of solid information for free on YouTube and their websites, and I am intimidated by that.

        I was thinking of starting a new site/blog and catering to the rock/blues crowd since I know that better. But you're right. All the free content intimidates me. Justinguitar.com offers a gazillion good videos on YouTube for free! And it's good stuff!

        It's frustrating when I think about trying to compete with that. I know that if I build solid relationships with an audience they would still buy my products, but I guess I'm just wondering if there's going to be enough money in it in the end, or I should just go and try to sell T-shirts with Facebook ads or something.

        Lots of thinking out loud here...sorry.
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          If you can understand the emotional triggers involved in the buying decision process, you can make a fortune in virtually any commercially viable niche. What I've always taught my writers is to think of themselves as "guides" (specifically, the mindset of a concierge); leading prospects on a progressive journey of discovery through the marketing jungle. This related post may be helpful.

          Marketing copy (btw, this includes articles) that "looks good" and is interesting, entertaining, provocative, personable, controversial, etc works, but that's actually only part of the internal narrative. Winning the hearts and minds of qualified prospects within your niche is an emotional connection, known as branding. An excellent book discussing this in detail and which I often recommend is Brand Against the Machine, by John Morgan.
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  • When you say Big 3, how can you leave out IT/Science and House Hold Appliance niches ?! There are alot of 'Big' niches apart from the ones mentioned.

    Money can be made in every niche and people are making 100K+ in more niches than not. The mentioned niches are have a higher exposure hence you see people writing on how much they're earning to possible either sell their products or gain students.

    As for guitarist goes, this is a perfectly strong and profitable niche. There are alot of affiliate products on guitar learning in Clickbank and other markets.
    If I can give you my best advise, It would be to give more preference to video marketing rather than websites. When I started to learn guitar, I never went to any website from organic search because I thought I could gain more from videos.

    Best of Luck in this niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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    Originally Posted by BrandonLB View Post

    Anyone making big bucks outside of the "big 3" niches?
    Yes. I think (this is just "from gossip": I can't prove it, and could be mistaken, too) that few of ClickBank's top 100 affiliates are in what most people would call "big niches". And I think that's also indicative of a wider trend.

    I'm not in IM/MMO/dating/weight-loss, myself, though I certainly don't exclude the whole of "health".

    Many of the people I know to be hugely successful as affiliates (I don't mean just on ClickBank) are in niches of which many members here might barely be aware.

    Originally Posted by BrandonLB View Post

    I'm trying to enter and brand myself in a hobby niche...
    The idea is good, in principle. I think "enthusiasts' niches" are better, overall, than "problem-solving niches". (Many people disagree, but I think quite often just because the opposite's what they're used to hearing, rather than from real experience.)

    Originally Posted by BrandonLB View Post

    Just a curious question...who all on here is in a hobby niche and outside of the big 3 and making decent money?? By decent I mean over $100K/year.
    I think many are. But mostly they post here less than other people. (Huge numbers of people struggling in IM/MMO niches post a lot, I think? That's my guess, anyway). I don't still give income figures, but (as I said at the time, when I did), I was earning more than that well over 3 years ago, and my business has grown plenty since then. I'm in "small niches" and "enthusiasts' niches", mostly. I have 9 of them, now, each completely different/unrelated. It's been much easier money for me.

    I don't know if they'll see your thread and post, but I know there are others here to whom "all the above" also applies.

    Originally Posted by BrandonLB View Post

    I'm just struggling with this inner question right now of what market I should enter that will produce the financial goals I'm striving for. Getting a bit frustrated with this inner dialogue.
    I wouldn't necessarily write off the whole of "health", but my suggestion, for what it's worth, is to avoid most of the well-known, huge markets.

    What this all boils down to is "the size of the pie" versus "the size of your slice of the pie".

    In my opinion, many people make the fundamental mistake of making decisions on the basis of the size of the pie. To me, this seems deeply misguided. What matters to me is the size of my slice of the pie, because that's what feeds me and pays my mortgage and bills every month. I don't want the extra effort of getting near those huge pies with crowds of people all over them. It's far easier for me to feed myself on large slices of smaller pies, and I eat a lot more that way (if you'll excuse this metaphor being extended so far by someone so skinny!).

    I'm not in your guitar-teaching/learning niche, but I suspect it's a jolly competitive one. Not that that's necessarily bad, depending on your traffic-generation plan. But whatever you do, if you want to make a decent living, you almost certainly need a business that doesn't depend on Google for its primary traffic?

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post9254403 <---- more thoughts here, if they help.
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  • Originally Posted by BrandonLB View Post

    I'm trying to enter and brand myself in a hobby niche..."learn guitar." I know how to play guitar and could teach it. It's hard to find advice from people who are making money from hobby niches.
    Anything Music related can either be a hobby, or a profession, depending on which of those "you" decide it's going to be.

    Regarding, "Learn guitar", it's a competitive niche, however not impossible to penetrate and make a name for yourself. In order to stand out, you will need to be "different" in someway though. Draw upon your personal talents, skills, personality, resources, for example...

    You could film yourself teaching your wife how to play the guitar and then upload the videos to YouTube, or add them to a paid course. This is one of those things that could take off and go viral, especially if there is a good chemistry between the two of you, and/or your wife is extremely hot. Yes I said it.

    I'm just struggling with this inner question right now of what market I should enter that will produce the financial goals I'm striving for. Getting a bit frustrated with this inner dialogue.
    Stop the inner dialogue, (analysis paralysis) and make a move. Do something, anything. Preferably in a field you love. Life is too short.

    Just a curious question...who all on here is in a hobby niche and outside of the big 3 and making decent money??
    I guess I qualify. It's been well over decade online, and another decade+ offline in the music & entertainment business full time.
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  • Profile picture of the author visimedia
    I make money on "make money" niche, and I think the key here is to build a targeted list that knows us, which has a good relationship with us.
    No better way to make money unless we build a list.

    Because it's a TOO COMPETITIVE niche, that's why after you generate traffic (which is hard and expensive due to too many competitors) you will need to keep it.

    Cultivate the list, make money from it.
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  • Profile picture of the author nicolasmd2112
    There is money to be made in any niche. More people are making money in hobby niches than you think because when it comes to hobbies, there are literally millions of them. From the more common ones to the unusual ones, if you can successfully engage or provide value to your list/audience you can make money. Also, some people take on multiple hobby niches to have income coming from different areas...
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  • Profile picture of the author Lance K
    Get really good at marketing and you can hire someone else to be the expert. Unless of course you want to be the face of your venture.
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