Isn't Every Niche Competetive?

32 replies
So I am in the dog training niche, as a professional trainer trying to sell his product (not really an internet marketer). Seems like every so often I always get the "wow that's a really competitive niche" comment. I know there are other people doing what I am trying to do already, but I feel like if they are succesful then there must be a market for the product?

Isn't every niche, to some extent, competitive or am I really over my head here.
#competetive #niche
  • Profile picture of the author dana67
    Every niche has competition to some extent unless you are inventing something entirely brand new. Competition doesn't mean you cannot succeed. It just means you need to work harder than the competition and do it better.

    Good luck.
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    • Profile picture of the author datingworld
      Originally Posted by dana67 View Post

      Every niche has competition to some extent unless you are inventing something entirely brand new. Competition doesn't mean you cannot succeed. It just means you need to work harder than the competition and do it better.

      Good luck.
      Very true.


      Most of the niches are competitive.
      Personally I would like to be in a competitive niche as money is there.
      Its better to be in competitive niche to make a portion from Big money rather than ruling a less competitive niche with little or no money

      “A small piece of a big pie is
      better than a large piece of a small pie.”
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  • Profile picture of the author Phil Steptoe
    My honest belief is that if you work on your marketing and try different and new methods, NO niche is too saturated. You can always make things swing just by thinking outside of the box. There are definitely niches that are extremely competitive while others that lay untapped. Just my two cents. Cheers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Antoniazzi
    Yeah that's how I feel. My product is also different than than what you typically see in my niche. I think, and hope, that if you have a USP then that can give you an advantage in taking some of the space.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeff Lenney
    Banned
    The bigger the niche is, the more money there is for you to make. Just find a sub niche of that, how to make your Dog stop barking, how to make your dog stop marking on the floor, how to make your dog stop chasing your cat, you get the idea. Find a sub niche within the bigger niche and own that.

    Use the Google keyword planner to find out what people are searching for and how many monthly searches that phrase gets, next use the free version of traffic Travis to see how competitive that keyword is with regards to Google and search engine optimization. You'll find there are tons of a decent searches for keywords that are to be pretty easy for you to link and bring in traffic for, just offer a better product than anybody else
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Mayers
    Hey Alex,

    I honestly think that you are in a great niche. Competition, in my opinion, only means that there is money being made in a niche. And of course the more money to be made, more competition. Every niche is competitive to some extent but i dont think you're in over your head.

    -Josh
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    • Profile picture of the author The Niche Man
      Congratulations Alexbrightdog, (cool name by the way). You're in an incredible niche. I know people who love their dog more than some of their family members. And I'm sure I'm not the only one who can say that here.

      Dog training to me is not only a good money maker, but a incredible public service.

      You play a vital role in making dogs more productive on the one hand. And perhaps help save an unruly dogs life who could possible bite someone or cause property damage, etc.

      As others have mentioned it is highly competitive, that's good news!

      Unfortunately, there are people who have what I call "competitive phobia" or fear of competition. Most mean well.

      For some reason most people's gut reaction is ... someone should only start a business if there's no competition. If that was the case 99% of businesses that are household names today wouldn't exist.

      In this new economy "no competition" usually means "no money to be made" in more and more cases.

      It's funny, many of those same people will spend all there time looking for markets with no competition. Instead of making money by finding ways to differentiate themselves. Go figure. Don't fall in that trap.

      The key is to do things you're competitors aren't doing or doing as well. And emphasize "that thing" in your marketing and ads.

      The dog training market is so vast, there's a lot of ways to differentiate yourself from the pack (pardon the pun).

      All the elements of a vibrant growing market is there.
      • Starving market - desperate for solutions.(Scores of people who love their dogs - but don't like them because of irritating behaviors).
      • Businesses, government agencies and special needs organizations galore. Many have a desperate need for trained dogs 24/7/365
      • Puppies born everyday that need training. Your future looks bright.

      Don't let the "competitive phobic" people sway you. Go hard!
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Antoniazzi
        Originally Posted by The Niche Man View Post

        Congratulations Alexbrightdog, (cool name by the way). You're in an incredible niche. I know people who love their dog more than some of their family members. And I'm sure I'm not the only one who can say that here.

        Dog training to me is not only a good money maker, but a incredible public service.

        You play a vital role in making dogs more productive on the one hand. And perhaps help save an unruly dogs life who could possible bite someone or cause property damage, etc.

        As others have mentioned it is highly competitive, that's good news!

        Unfortunately, there are people who have what I call "competitive phobia" or fear of competition. Most mean well.

        For some reason most people's gut reaction is ... someone should only start a business if there's no competition. If that was the case 99% of businesses that are household names today wouldn't exist.

        In this new economy "no competition" usually means "no money to be made" in more and more cases.

        It's funny, many of those same people will spend all there time looking for markets with no competition. Instead of making money by finding ways to differentiate themselves. Go figure. Don't fall in that trap.

        The key is to do things you're competitors aren't doing or doing as well. And emphasize "that thing" in your marketing and ads.

        The dog training market is so vast, there's a lot of ways to differentiate yourself from the pack (pardon the pun).

        All the elements of a vibrant growing market is there.
        • Starving market - desperate for solutions.(Scores of people who love their dogs - but don't like them because of irritating behaviors).
        • Businesses, government agencies and special needs organizations galore. Many have a desperate need for trained dogs 24/7/365
        • Puppies born everyday that need training. Your future looks bright.

        Don't let the "competitive phobic" people sway you. Go hard!

        Thanks for the advice, that is great to hear. Hopefully I can make this work
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by Alexbrightdog View Post

    So I am in the dog training niche, as a professional trainer trying to sell his product (not really an internet marketer). Seems like every so often I always get the "wow that's a really competitive niche" comment. I know there are other people doing what I am trying to do already, but I feel like if they are succesful then there must be a market for the product?

    Isn't every niche, to some extent, competitive or am I really over my head here.
    Most niches are competitive to some degree. It's just that some niches have higher degrees of competition. If you perform a supply and demand analysis of that niche you may find that the dog training, as competitive as it is, may not be as competitive as the dating advice to men niche.

    There are other factors to look at other than how competitive a niche is. What is the elastic or inelastic demand of your product and/or service? Is the niche large enough to sustain another new entrant into the market?

    If the demand is there, then going into a competitive niche is actually a good thing and not a bad thing.

    In general, the more competitive a niche or market is, the better your USP and your product and service have to be; though I've found over the years, HOW you position and promote your product / service/ brand is as important or more important than the product / service itself.

    RoD
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  • Profile picture of the author IrisMKH
    A lady once mentioned how she was the only one with kite building pages for a while - until someone made a better website and outranked her.

    Being the first... Wouldn't that be possible for certain languages at the moment? You can find English sources on almost everything, but what about Mongolian or Khmer?
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    • Profile picture of the author KenJ
      Originally Posted by IrisMKH View Post

      A lady once mentioned how she was the only one with kite building pages for a while - until someone made a better website and outranked her.

      Being the first... Wouldn't that be possible for certain languages at the moment? You can find English sources on almost everything, but what about Mongolian or Khmer?
      This is a great idea. Use other languages where the niche is still huge. Being first is very important as well.

      I am currently moving one of my projects over to a Spanish version for this very reason.

      Thanks Iris

      KenJ
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  • Profile picture of the author gluckspilz
    There's always going to be competition in every niche. How I see it, just beat them at marketing = You Win!.

    I took a break from IM for a while and started my journey with "Non competitive niches". However, there is still a ton of marketers in those niches. That being said, as long as you position yourself correctly with your marketing. You should beat your competition.

    That's why in the evergreen niches like weight loss or IM. So many newbies fail because their position is all wrong EVEN if they model or do exactly what other gurus do...
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  • Profile picture of the author megamind22
    Not all niche are competitive if you can find them cause they are some hidden niches that you can tap into if you do thorough research. But make sure they can be monetized.

    However, the fact that they is competitions it doesn't stop you from been successful if you have good advertising in place.

    The good thing is you are already in a good niche. So all you need is to tap into where others are not yet utilizing. Hope that helps
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  • Profile picture of the author pr0digy
    Hey Alex,

    competitive niches are acutally good. it means that your niche converts. based on my experience it's much harder for me to make profit out of "smaller" niches.

    if you want money, you have to go where to money flows.

    best regards
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  • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
    Originally Posted by Alexbrightdog View Post

    Isn't every niche, to some extent, competitive .
    Not really. I was looking at a cocaine angle yesterday and it was wide open to exploit online.

    Now that you've had a laugh, let me say something I've told some of my product buyers but seemingly no one on this forum has figured out:

    Your local dog training niche has what for competition? (1) Other dog trainers who are (2) in your local area. Say a 15 mile radius. Your competition to train the new dog on the block is only a few trainers.

    How many local dog trainers are listed in the local Yellow Pages or other similar guide?

    A website selling a dog training PDF report has what for competition? (1) Any yo-yo out of 6 billion people who are (2) virtually worldwide. Your competition is unlimited.

    How many are listed on the #1 Internet source for finding something - the first page of Google? 10. Ten out of the entire world.

    Internet competition can be extremely brutal. The barrier to entry is minimal with anyone being able to put up a dog training page in minutes. This is one big reason why so many have entered this forum over the years, thought they could make a fortune online, and then been spit out after making nothing.

    Thousands upon thousands of newbie marketers have been drawn like bugs to the light in certain niches, where they are then quickly roasted. Dogs is one. Acne is another.

    What you are currently in over your head about, which can be cured, is having a business plan where you understand the competition and have a strategy for identifying your potential customers and positioning your product in front of their cute, furry noses.

    .
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  • Profile picture of the author cborgrx
    Alex....always be thinking "outside the box" and it won't be long before you leap frog over your competition. Good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author carlo_sim
    There's competition everywhere! The only way to beat the competition is to provide value to your audience. Quality content plus traffic = $$$
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Let me answer your question this way.

      You better hope to God that the niche YOU want to get into IS competitive. Because if there is no competition, the chances of that niche being monetizable (s that even a word? LOL) are slim to none and breaking into a new niche that nobody else has discovered that has profit potential is extremely rare. Sure, you can be a groundbreaker. But you're probably going to have 100 failures before you hit on one that succeeds.

      Find a niche that you have an interest in that already has products that sell in it and come up with an angle. Maybe a product that targets a very small sub section of that niche. Research what's already selling and come out with something better.

      But for God's sake, don't try to get into underwater pig throwing and expect to make any money in it. There is little chance that anybody is going to want to learn how to throw pigs wile under water.

      Most likely, if it doesn't exist, there is no money to be made with it once you create it.
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      • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        Let me answer your question this way.

        You better hope to God that the niche YOU want to get into IS competitive. Because if there is no competition, the chances of that niche being monetizable (s that even a word? LOL) are slim to none and breaking into a new niche that nobody else has discovered that has profit potential is extremely rare.
        Frankly, this is utter nonsense. Steve, just because you can't identify niches with little to no competition that can be monetized does not mean me, or others, cannot. I thought you were done trying to give advice.

        For instance, within the last half hour I made a post on a site (not the WF) and in response someone sent me $50. (I gave them a great deal due to a special situation.) Why? Because I happen to know the answer to a specific, painful issue for which there is little to no competition online.

        Here is how I do it .

        I set up a Google alert to notify me whenever this issue pops up anywhere online. I then review the posting, see how I can provide some useful information, and then get paid for providing the full information I know, which for the most part has not changed in a decade.

        Here is how someone else could do it ...

        A friend of mine, right now, is having trouble training her dog. The mutt has caused over $3000 worth of damage the past few weeks - repeatedly doing the same thing when some event happens. Do you think she has some incentive to pay for expert advice to fix a very specific dog problem? Of course she does.

        Note I said "specific problem" - not generic "dog training."

        Soooo, instead of waiting for potential customers in need of immediate advice to try to find you in the infinite web and battling it out with SEO, set up an alert so you can know where the prospect is, get in front of their face, so to speak, showing yourself as someone with answer, and close the deal.



        .
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        • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
          Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

          Frankly, this is utter nonsense. Steve, just because you can't identify niches with little to no competition that can be monetized does not mean me, or others, cannot. I thought you were done trying to give advice.

          For instance, within the last half hour I made a post on a site (not the WF) and in response someone sent me $50. (I gave them a great deal due to a special situation.) Why? Because I happen to know the answer to a specific, painful issue for which there is little to no competition online.

          Here is how I do it .

          I set up a Google alert to notify me whenever this issue pops up anywhere online. I then review the posting, see how I can provide some useful information, and then get paid for providing the full information I know, which for the most part has not changed in a decade.

          Here is how someone else could do it ...

          A friend of mine, right now, is having trouble training her dog. The mutt has caused over $3000 worth of damage the past few weeks - repeatedly doing the same thing when some event happens. Do you think she has some incentive to pay for expert advice to fix a very specific dog problem? Of course she does.

          Note I said "specific problem" - not generic "dog training."

          Soooo, instead of waiting for potential customers in need of immediate advice to try to find you in the infinite web and battling it out with SEO, set up an alert so you can know where the prospect is, get in front of their face, so to speak, showing yourself as someone with answer, and close the deal.



          .
          You say it's utter nonsense. I say it's common sense.

          But let me make sure I understand this.

          I'm going to think of some kind of very specific solution to a very specific problem that, through research, I discover to have none or very little competition for and these "alerts" are going to total up enough in sum to turn my solution into a full time money maker and nobody else on the entire planet has thought of that same problem and come up with a solution for it.

          I find that extremely difficult to believe. For one thing, every problem I've ever had (mostly health related) that I've thought of, when researching, already had a massive number of sites with solutions. So maybe I just don't know how to think of things that are so specific that I find this gold mine. And as I said in my response, very rare. I did not say impossible. So my response can only come from my own experience. If you've had luck coming up with solutions to rare problems then power to you. I have yet to be able to do that and as I said, I can only respond from my own experience, which spans 11 years online.

          As for never giving advice, I never said that. I said I was done selling "how to make money" products. They are hardly the same thing.
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          • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
            Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

            I find that extremely difficult to believe.
            That's why you're making $30 per month.

            One possible dog training problem: my dog keeps eating my underwear. How do I make him stop?

            I know a couple people who have had this problem. We once had a dog do this and an extremely funny story resulted I can't share in public since it involves my wife.

            There is probably someone posting that question on a forum right now.

            Do a search on Google for: dog eating underwear

            Um. That's not stiff competition. But, obviously a problem people are talking about. If dog forums are anything like the WF you get a lot of people posting garbage, or 'me to' posts, but not a lot of specific solutions that work.

            How hard is it to create an authority page addressing that issue? Making money from AdSense, and/or an affiliate link to a helpful product, and/or a purchase link to your own product, and/or a purchase option to offer personal help - maybe even a phone call to walk someone though how to deal with the situation?

            How hard is to set up a Google alert for those words so you know immediately whenever someone is having that problem?

            How hard is this to do this over and over and over? There could be an infinite number of "dog training" problems people have. If you know jack about dog training you can rattle off a dozen issues in the next ten seconds one could prepare authoritative information about off the top of their head.

            The problem someone has is not really dog training. How to teach a dog not to cause a specific problem is what someone is desperate to learn.

            The only reason "dog training" is competitive is because, as I previously noted, it is one of the magic niches every newbie Internet marketer in the world is somehow attracted to. There are a few others. But hardly any of them know anything about marketing or understanding a niche or how to make money. That is why real niche issues where there is money to be made, such as keeping your dog out of the laundry basket, remain uncompetitive.

            Steve, perhaps this helps think about niches, problems and solutions in a different way from what you have been doing, and opens the door to brain storming opportunities.

            .
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            • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
              Someone sent a PM thanking me for a post, great idea, but wondering how to set up an alert and wanting information about doing this.

              Thanks - but Bing is your friend here. Even Google. Do a search for: google alerts and undoubtedly this will pop up:

              Google Alerts - Monitor the Web for interesting new content

              Just follow the easy instructions to set it up.

              There are options to get results from everything on the web, and only from the 'best' sites. In my experience the 'best' sites is what you want.

              I would set up two alerts. One for everything Google finds and the second for the best sites. Play around with getting alerts immediately, or once a day, to see the volume of what Google sends you. Then evaluate the results and either keep both alerts or cancel one. Or, cancel both and start over with new settings and/or a new keyword.

              You don't have to do this, but due to the volume of alerts I have, I use custom email addresses for each alert, such as:

              googlealert-KEYWORD@mydomain.com

              And then I filter the messages in my email program (Thunderbird) into different folders so I can better keep track of what Google is sending me per topic.

              .
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            • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
              Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

              That's why you're making $30 per month.

              One possible dog training problem: my dog keeps eating my underwear. How do I make him stop?

              I know a couple people who have had this problem. We once had a dog do this and an extremely funny story resulted I can't share in public since it involves my wife.

              There is probably someone posting that question on a forum right now.

              Do a search on Google for: dog eating underwear

              Um. That's not stiff competition. But, obviously a problem people are talking about. If dog forums are anything like the WF you get a lot of people posting garbage, or 'me to' posts, but not a lot of specific solutions that work.

              How hard is it to create an authority page addressing that issue? Making money from AdSense, and/or an affiliate link to a helpful product, and/or a purchase link to your own product, and/or a purchase option to offer personal help - maybe even a phone call to walk someone though how to deal with the situation?

              How hard is to set up a Google alert for those words so you know immediately whenever someone is having that problem?

              How hard is this to do this over and over and over? There could be an infinite number of "dog training" problems people have. If you know jack about dog training you can rattle off a dozen issues in the next ten seconds one could prepare authoritative information about off the top of their head.

              The problem someone has is not really dog training. How to teach a dog not to cause a specific problem is what someone is desperate to learn.

              The only reason "dog training" is competitive is because, as I previously noted, it is one of the magic niches every newbie Internet marketer in the world is somehow attracted to. There are a few others. But hardly any of them know anything about marketing or understanding a niche or how to make money. That is why real niche issues where there is money to be made, such as keeping your dog out of the laundry basket, remain uncompetitive.

              Steve, perhaps this helps think about niches, problems and solutions in a different way from what you have been doing, and opens the door to brain storming opportunities.

              .
              I actually get what you're saying. And putting it that way, I guess I can see a small market for each individual specific problem and I guess if you do enough of these it can add up to a substantial amount of money, In fact, back in the good old days when it wasn't that hard, people would just put up blogs for all kinds of odds and ends niches. They did hundreds of these and between them all made a crap ton of cash.

              My problem is trying to think of that "keep my dog from eating my underwear" kind of problem. The niches I do have knowledge of, which essentially come down to music, video games and health, I don't know any of those kind of questions. Or more specifically, I don't know how to think of those kind of questions. My mind just isn't wired that way. It was actually always one of my weak points even when I was successful. Fortunately, I was able to create products that were more generic and still sold.

              If you asked me to sit down and think of a specific health issue that minute, I couldn't.

              Take hemorrhoids, which I myself have suffered from. I mean either you have them and are in pain from them and want to get rid of them or you don't. I can't think of any way to dig any deeper into that specific problem than what it actually is. When I was suffering, I simply wanted a cure for them. While I didn't find a cure, I found a treatment that has kept me pain free for over 3 years. And yes, it even has an affiliate program.

              But so what? The niche is ridiculously competitive. I would have to sink a ton of money into PPC or put up an authority site the size of Texas. And then guess what? The site that actually creates the treatment would always rank higher than me and most likely all the thousands of affiliates who have had sites long before mine would go up. I gave it an effort, albeit not a huge commitment one and I get an opt in every week or so, but so far haven't made one sale. I'm certainly not going to make a steady living off this niche. And I'm even a product user and honestly believe in the product. Doesn't matter. I have way too much competition.

              If there was a dig down deep question for hemorrhoids that I could capitalize on just like your "dog eating underwear" thing, believe me, I'd target that keyword and go for it. But like I said, as a former sufferer, if you have them all you care about is getting rid of them.

              So again, my personal problem is every niche I think of, when I go to do the research, has tons of competition. There has never been one in all these years that I could think of that was so off the wall like "dog eating underwear.' Again, my brain doesn't work that way, even for areas where I am very knowledgeable.

              And I don't think that is something you can teach somebody. They either know how to think way outside the box like that or they don't. That's why every time a new "thing" comes around I always say to myself, "Damn, why can't I think of something like that?" I honestly swear to you that I just don't know how to do it.

              Now somebody here gave me an idea that I think will take off. It's going to take a lot of work on my part and from the little research I've done so far it looks like there is a demand for it. How much? I guess I'll find out when I put the product out on the market. But even if it's a small demand, I don't need much to put me over the hump. $1,200 a month should do it. That shouldn't be too difficult to do.

              Anyway, I understand what you're saying. I just don't know how to think that way and secondly, even if I did someday, I don't think I could live off of just one of those niches. Right now I'd be happy for just one, but I need to concentrate my efforts right now on things that I do know and feel I have a chance of capitalizing on, even if just marginally.
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              • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
                Take hemorrhoids, which I myself have suffered from. I mean either you have them and are in pain from them and want to get rid of them or you don't. I can't think of any way to dig any deeper into that specific problem than what it actually is.
                A couple quick ideas come to mind.

                - Use the Google alert tactic to know when and where someone is complaining. If it is a forum - common, then like this one you make a post with useful information, including a link to page where even more information can be found. Your monetized page.

                I do this all the time and it works great.

                This is KEY - your monetized page has to provide really good information. If it is just a sales page then it looks like you're spamming a forum and then you're toast. If it looks like you are providing useful information to help someone out then you're hailed as a hero.

                - Lots of people have hemorrhoids. Common enough you could make posts in "other" topic forums and probably get some business.

                Example - while posting about golf tips in a golf forum your signature line is: Painful hemorrhoids keeping you off the course? Get an easy one hour solution here.

                I imagine something like that on the WF would draw better than do you like my classical music. Something like: Hemorrhoids kept me from sitting around making a pile of money online. Not anymore! Get an easy one hour solution here plus one of my successful niche products for free.

                If you asked me to sit down and think of a specific health issue that minute, I couldn't.
                - Again, Steve, think harder about niche ideas.

                I just went to Bing and started to type into the search box:

                do hemorrhoids

                Bing gave me a list of suggested search terms - all of them niche ideas. You don't even have to think of them. Bing and Google will give them to you!

                Here's one: do hemorrhoids bleed when you poop?

                I have no idea what the answer is. I'll wildly guess there is not a lot of competition for this, but it has enough search interest to cause Bing to suggest it. It sounds like a serious answer is in order with analysis of what else might cause bloody #2. If someone didn't want to pay an expensive co-pay to a doctor they may want to get a special report.

                You can get specific niche ideas from Bing, Google and eBay - all for free.

                .
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            • Profile picture of the author IrisMKH
              Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

              How hard is to set up a Google alert for those words so you know immediately whenever someone is having that problem?
              Not taking stances on how effective it is, but this just blew my mind. It's definitely something I want to try.
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  • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
    I feel like there are advantages and disadvantages to any niche. If it's a larger niche, there will be more competition among sellers but that means there will also be a lot more buyers. If it's a smaller niche there may not be as many sellers but there will be a lot less buyers. I would think that would make it much harder to make sales.

    I'm thinking in the end there may not be much difference what no matter what niche you choose. I think a lot of it comes down to the quality and functionality of the product you are selling/promoting. If I'm working in a crowded niche, I tend to stick to products that are necessities and/or help people solve problems, as opposed to "luxury" products, which aren't products a customer needs, just something they want to have.

    Now in smaller niches, believe it or not, I find that I have better luck selling luxury products. I still have not figured out exactly why this is. For instance, in the "dog training" niche, things such as food and shampoo are pretty much necessities, while items such as beds and toys are not. Maybe it's just my selling/promoting style, but I know that it would be much easier for me to sell food and shampoo than it would beds and toys. If I'm promoting in a smaller niche, I'd most likely sell more beds and toys. It's a strange phenomenon, and like I said, I'm not quite sure why this happens.

    It could purely be a numbers thing. Maybe because dog training is such a large niche there are more people in the market for things they must have.

    All in all, though, I find every niche is competitive in it's own way.

    Another thing I find that happens to me a lot is a niche that I think is very small and specialized turns out not to be so small. I recently watched a documentary about people who prefer to live in "tiny" houses/apartments (300 sq. feet and below) and one of the things they mentioned is that most people prefer to build their own tiny houses. A light bulb went off in my head as I thought about all of the products that could be promoted in this niche such as building plans, carpentry books and other "how to" products, and I got very excited, thinking I had just uncovered an evergreen and somewhat untouched niche. After doing some research, I quickly found out that it was indeed a pretty large niche and one that would be very difficult to break into.

    The bottom line is that niche marketing can be very tricky, and in my opinion niche research is probably the single most important aspect when it comes to creating products and launching blogs & websites. Just my two cents!
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  • Profile picture of the author ATAC
    Your attitude is correct but the dog training niche is the oldest and the most competitive niche there is !
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  • Profile picture of the author JayCununk
    The trick is standing out. It doesn't matter how competitive your niche is if you can stand out. Like a large crowd of people sitting and one guy is standing, make yourself noticeable.
    Best of Luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Global Content Services
    Banned
    Less competition = $ or probably zero
    High competition = $$$$$....
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Antoniazzi
    Yeah the google alert thing is awesome. ^_^
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  • Profile picture of the author craighakwins
    Most of them are, but you will find a few niches out there without THAT much competition. Also one thing, you would want to go local if you're looking to find less competition. The more specific you are the less problems you will have.
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  • It is far easier to market a niche with little competition but it is always possible to make money in a more saturated niche as well. You will have to work hard on advertising and on making sure that is site is fully optimized. You can try and find a different approach to make yourself stand out from your competition. I believe that when a specific niche is saturated, it only means that there is a lot of money and demand in that particular niche.
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