How To Market A Product With Multiple USP's

20 replies
Hi all,

This forum has been a constant source of good advice and helped me really take some positive action. I have built an in depth online course in my field of expertise.

However, I have an overriding concern about my strategy for marketing it.

The product is going to be very useful for 4 key potential customers which are:

- People that have been trying to teach themselves and getting nowhere and I have the REAL information that is used in the industry,
-Students that want to get in to the industry
- In my niche there is one area that is HEAVILY promoted and I know it to be full of scammers and explain why they shouldnt touch it.
- Experienced people in my niche that want extra strategies.

The information I give is thorough and unique to each of there groups and would define them all as a USP

However, I am concerned I will overwhelm my potential new customer if my homepages tries to sell them on all these levels seeing as I know people on the internet tend to skim over things that dont grab them immediately... but maybe I am not giving my customer enough credit and by showing them all the different levels it will make the product seem an even better product?

But i dont want to pick just one market to gear the sales towards because i am cutting out 3 other HUGE markets.

I dont think creating separate products would be a good move either as at the moment I am really happy with the breadth and depth of the course with lots of material. But breaking it down into little products they would all seem a bit lightweight and brief. Plus the course is written and I relate to all 4 groups as we go through

I am thinking I should focus my efforts on designing a homepage that succinctly gets these 4 points across to people.

But wanted to hear your advice please

Many thanks
#market #multiple #product #usp
  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    First off, I think you might be a bit confused on what a USP is. The most common meaning for the acronym is "Unique Selling Proposition", and it means that something that sets you apart from the competition.

    You seem to be talking about four distinct market segments within your niche.

    The answer is simple - have a separate landing page for each segment. That way, you can drill down and really match your presentation to the conversation already going on in their heads.

    I'm seeing more sellers going back to the "mini-portal" style home page, with a general idea of what the product is about, along with links that let people sort themselves by clicking for the info appropriate for them.

    In your case it would be something like:
    Headline

    Description of your course and what sets you apart from the rest.

    A row of icons/photos/whatever is appropriate. Under each photo, a link to specific information, like "trying to teach yourself and it's just not working? Click here." Repeat for your other three market segments.
    All of this should fit nicely in one screen, without making visitors scroll. If you want to add more below that, fine.

    If you have a list opt-in form, tag the forms to show which segment the subscribers sorted themselves into. That way, in addition to general messages, you can also send messages aimed specifically at that segment. Or just keep four separate lists, if that's easier.
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    • Profile picture of the author sudo rank
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      The answer is simple - have a separate landing page for each segment. That way, you can drill down and really match your presentation to the conversation already going on in their heads.
      You beat me to the punchline

      Like John said, have a handful of USP's is common for lots of companies. That's why some large companies will run wildly different marketing campaigns that are targeted at different sections of their user base.

      Your forum is no different, you'll need to look at what each segment of your customer base does with their time, where you can market to them at and then build a campaign around it.

      Eventually you'll probably be running a handful of different campaigns at any one time. The bonus of this is diversification, not all your eggs are in one demographics basket.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tommyg123
    That sounds like a great suggestion thanks John
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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    Jack of all trades, master of none.

    Don't try and be everything to everyone because it will only dilute your marketing message.

    Pick your absolute most targeted prospect and your sales message should speak to them only.
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    • Profile picture of the author pjunction
      Originally Posted by WillR View Post

      Don't try and be everything to everyone because it will only dilute your marketing message.
      This is a common problem among marketers. Thinking their product can solve multiple problems, but people just don't buy into the concept. You're better of solving one problem at a time, solve it well and you'll have a following of customers waiting for you to solve their next problem. They might not know it's a problem, but you'll tell them it is and then solve it for them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rainee
    Originally Posted by Tommyg123 View Post

    Hi all,

    This forum has been a constant source of good advice and helped me really take some positive action. I have built an in depth online course in my field of expertise.

    However, I have an overriding concern about my strategy for marketing it.

    The product is going to be very useful for 4 key potential customers which are:

    - People that have been trying to teach themselves and getting nowhere and I have the REAL information that is used in the industry,

    This "potential customer" is already sold on your "field of expertise" and they need ONE specific message.

    -Students that want to get in to the industry

    This "potential customer" is interested in your "field of expertise" but has no working knowledge or understanding as they are just being introduced to the industry. These people need ONE specific message.

    - In my niche there is one area that is HEAVILY promoted and I know it to be full of scammers and explain why they shouldnt touch it.

    This is an actual "hint" as to what your USP could be...that is, if you want to tap into the fear angle. No judgment. Fear is a great motivator; only, when you market to attract fear motivated people, that "fear" belief system is easily triggered and can be transferred to your offerings.

    - Experienced people in my niche that want extra strategies.

    These "potential customers" who want "extra strategies" generally just want the "edge" so they can stay at the top of their game. Perhaps you can help them; however, if you're not clear on your message, you will turn this type off. Get clear on your message for one of the first two types and those looking for the "edge" will find you because they're always on the lookout for that "edge."

    However, I am concerned I will overwhelm my potential new customer if my homepages tries to sell them on all these levels seeing as I know people on the internet tend to skim over things that dont grab them immediately... but maybe I am not giving my customer enough credit and by showing them all the different levels it will make the product seem an even better product?

    If you try to "talk" to the three different types of people you mentioned above, you will cause confusion, overwhelm and perhaps disbelief.

    Yes, disbelief...in your ability to deliver on the promises you make on your sales page.

    Here's why...

    If someone is looking for the "edge," why are they going to believe you can give them that "edge" when you're also "talking" to those who are just getting started?

    If someone is struggling working the fundamentals to be successful, why are they going to believe you can make all their hard work pay off when you're also "talking" to people who don't even know the basics because they're "just looking" to "possibly" get started?

    If someone is just looking to just get started, why are they going to believe you can help them, as a newbie, when you're also "talking" to those advanced people who are just looking for that "edge?"

    Can you see why you need to make a decision, at least initially, to market to ONE group of people?


    I dont think creating separate products would be a good move either as at the moment I am really happy with the breadth and depth of the course with lots of material.

    No offense...but, your product should not be about your happiness. It should be about producing relevant results for the customers you choose to serve.

    But breaking it down into little products they would all seem a bit lightweight and brief. Plus the course is written and I relate to all 4 groups as we go through

    Do you still want to "relate" to all those "groups" when each of them have different needs, desires and motivations?

    I am thinking I should focus my efforts on designing a homepage that succinctly gets these 4 points across to people.

    You may want to think again

    But wanted to hear your advice please

    Many thanks
    Hope this helps,
    Rainee

    P.S. Your USP is a simple compelling statement that tells prospects why they should listen to you, sets you apart from the crowd and gives you clarity so you stay focused on your purpose. I think you're really looking for four "hooks" to get the attention of those you want to read your salespage.

    P.P.S Final thought. You've put a lot of time, effort and love (I'm guessing) into the creation of your product. Give your self a break and kill every option except one because right now, it looks like you're drowning yourself in more and more options...and it doesn't have to be that way. It's really very simple...until it's not. Keep it simple.
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  • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
    What is the main benefit that these four modules deliver?
    How does this benefit is delivered faster, easier, cheaper or better?
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  • Profile picture of the author Tommyg123
    Thank you Rainee that's good advice.

    I guess I need to work on which market to target. The 'fear' angle going after main industry in my niche is my high risk high reward option. It is bound to get interest as it will be seen as controversial. But will appeal to the newbies...which I guess is actually the bigger market. But at the risk of making my product seem gimmicky perhaps?
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  • Profile picture of the author Tommyg123
    Do you think if I were to use "How professionals really do X demonstrated by a professional" is enough for a main selling point, the fact I actually demonstrate is a good selling point, and the brand is very much focused on the fact I have been there and done it and am not "just another company trying to make a buck out the industry" then highlight.

    "Professionals dont do X or Y we do THIS which i will show you"

    Is straightforward enough to not dilute my pitch and cover at least a couple of those 4 key selling points?

    Thanks to everyone for your help so far
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  • Profile picture of the author Tommyg123
    Sudo and John,

    I love the idea of having multiple landing pages it seems to solve my issue, but im not sure how to do this. Would I need to have 4 different domains for each niche? Or just give a different link from an advert or something?

    This is my first internet site and im feeling my way as i go.

    Thanks
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    • Profile picture of the author jeremy49
      Rainee's advice is spot on.
      When you talk to several people at the same time you talk to no one. Choose one segment that looks like it will be the most profitable or enjoyable, then concentrate on that one segment.

      The more specific you are, the more targeted you can be, and more you will stand out against the competition. As soon as you can stand out against your competition, you charge higher prices.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Tommyg123 View Post

      Sudo and John,

      I love the idea of having multiple landing pages it seems to solve my issue, but im not sure how to do this. Would I need to have 4 different domains for each niche? Or just give a different link from an advert or something?

      This is my first internet site and im feeling my way as i go.

      Thanks
      Here's how I would do it.

      The home page, the page someone lands on if they just type your domain in their browser, is built like I described above.

      Structurally, below that, I would put a sub-directory for each market segment. The index page for the sub-directory would be a segment-specific landing page to act as the "home page" for the sub-directory. Under that page would be the rest of the site's material that applies to only that segment.

      In effect, you would build four "sites" under your domain. One for each segment. Rather than sending people to your site's home page, you would send them to the index page for their segment.

      You could purchase a domain name for each sub-directory and do a simple redirect.

      While I don't disagree with Rainee's advice, I would modify it a bit. Go after one segment at a time, and keep your messages separate. Don't try to make your main content do double, triple or quadruple duty. In other words, in the part dealing with newbies, stick to newbie stuff. When dealing with the pros who already know the newbie stuff cold, stick to stuff on their level. It's okay to embed the same video in multiple sections, but the intro and follow-up should address the market segment that section is targeting.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tom B
        Banned
        One of my main products was something with mass appeal. As you probably already know, the potential is great but getting it out there is problematic if you don't have the big budgets like the huge corps when it comes to branding.

        The better alternative, in my opinion, is to set up completely different sites for each demographic. You will tailor each site to how your product can help that group of people.

        I would also look in to tailoring the product specifically to that group instead of having a general product that appeals to the mass. Each group will have different ways of communication, different word usage, etc... Reworking your product to fit within the group better will help immensely.

        If you have three specific groups of people you can sell, you will have three different products on three different websites.

        I would start out by concentrating on one group first. Get it up, running and profitable with that group before tackling the next group. This will keep you focused and lessen the work load.

        It's more work but I have no doubt you will make a lot more money doing it more targeted like suggested.
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        • Profile picture of the author Steve B
          Tommy,

          WillR (post #4) and Thomas (post#14) understand the difficulty with casting a very wide net. The more diverse the market is for your advertising, the harder it's going to be to appeal to anyone and everyone. The broader your reach, the more difficult it will be to target your product to the exact needs of your prospects.

          If I were you, I would set up separate sites for each of your four groups and also tweak your product so that it focused mainly on the needs of that particular audience.

          Is this approach more work? Yes, a little. But it doesn't have to be a whole lot more effort. You can clone your initial site and build a new site very quickly, then just tweak it to cater specifically to the target group. Do that three times.

          Same thing with your product, and same thing with your marketing. All can be very similar but with the emphasis squarely on the group you're targeting.

          You said: "I dont think creating separate products would be a good move either as at the moment I am really happy with the breadth and depth of the course with lots of material."

          So leave most of the content alone. Just focus and highlight the course specifically on one audience at a time. Add a chapter or section just for the group that you're targeting. Change the title to reflect the group you want to sell to. Make it seem like the course was written just for them.

          Yes, this is a little more work for you but it will pay off. The shotgun approach takes you farther and farther away from being specific in addressing needs and problems. If anything, you should be moving in the exact opposite direction ----> getting very direct and to the point.

          The approach you choose could mean the difference between a few sales to the more general audience or many sales in four separate markets.

          The very best to you,

          Steve
          Signature

          Steve Browne, online business strategies, tips, guidance, and resources
          SteveBrowneDirect

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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Steve, that's what I was trying to say, while trying to keep things under the umbrella of a single, brandable domain.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    Sometimes it's difficult figuring out how to balance all the marketing principles with real life.

    For example, let's say you sold a day planner like the Franklin planner. It works for anyone that needs to be more productive or track their time. If you had separate "products" let's say for CEOs, mothers with small children, teenagers, college students, etc. they wouldn't really be separate products. The planner is the same no matter the target market. Of course you could have the Leadership planner or the Women's planner but the insides - the core - would be the exact same.

    The same goes for something like antivirus software.

    Others here have given good advice in this thread but my small contribution is to not let it overwhelm you to the point of doing nothing. Get started with something targeted at somebody on some kind of website and then let your product and marketing grow from there: version 1.00, 1.1, 1.13, 2.5, etc.

    Mark
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    • Profile picture of the author Tom B
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Mark Singletary View Post

      Sometimes it's difficult figuring out how to balance all the marketing principles with real life.

      For example, let's say you sold a day planner like the Franklin planner. It works for anyone that needs to be more productive or track their time. If you had separate "products" let's say for CEOs, mothers with small children, teenagers, college students, etc. they wouldn't really be separate products. The planner is the same no matter the target market. Of course you could have the Leadership planner or the Women's planner but the insides - the core - would be the exact same.


      Mark
      Mark, taking your example, I have seen planners with different covers for different groups. I doubt a CEO would want a Bieber cover, on his planner, but some teenage girls would. It may be the same core but the product was created with specific groups in mind.

      I am talking from real life experiences here so I don't know where that little quip came from. There goes your Bieber planner I was planning on sending you for Christmas.

      More targeted efforts lead to more conversions and takes less money to get leads. It also provides better conversions for upsells or other products that could be promoted as an affiliate because you targeted much more.

      Segregating marketing lists is hardly a new concept and this is exactly the same concept.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tommyg123
    Thanks all for the continued help.

    I am providing an online training course and cover all the different niches interchangeably throughout the text and videos. I am thinking my main marketing angle will be the fact I am experienced and show exactly what I am doing (which is something the charlatans don't do) and the fact I am 'real' and demonstrate the tools I teach in hours of examples I can drop in 'don't do this or that which you may have been told to do from other people' as we go along and in the free tutorials I give which will be hitting my demographics?
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by Tommyg123 View Post

      Thanks all for the continued help.

      I am providing an online training course and cover all the different niches interchangeably throughout the text and videos. I am thinking my main marketing angle will be the fact I am experienced and show exactly what I am doing (which is something the charlatans don't do) and the fact I am 'real' and demonstrate the tools I teach in hours of examples I can drop in 'don't do this or that which you may have been told to do from other people' as we go along and in the free tutorials I give which will be hitting my demographics?
      Check out Digitalmarketer.com. Get on Ryan's list. Many questions shall be answered.

      mark
      Signature

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    • Profile picture of the author Tom B
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Tommyg123 View Post

      Thanks all for the continued help.

      I am providing an online training course and cover all the different niches interchangeably throughout the text and videos. I am thinking my main marketing angle will be the fact I am experienced and show exactly what I am doing (which is something the charlatans don't do) and the fact I am 'real' and demonstrate the tools I teach in hours of examples I can drop in 'don't do this or that which you may have been told to do from other people' as we go along and in the free tutorials I give which will be hitting my demographics?
      While being an expert helps, it only does to a certain degree unless you are already well known in the field. That would be something to build confidence while pushing why your training will help them.

      What pain will be taken away?

      How will that make them feel?

      Stuff like that is more important.
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