Should my pricing be transparent? Competition are doing it differently..

12 replies
Hi all, I am working on the website for my social media marketing company.

My main competition are currently getting customers to contact them before being quoted a price on their requirements.

I have many different options available and could easily lay these out on my website as well as encouraging people to contact me if they have any special requirements.

Which is the best option here? Be transparent with everything so people can decide if they are interested or not? Or get everyone to contact me with their requirements before quoting them individual prices?

I'd appreciate some thoughts on this
#competition #differently #pricing #transparent
  • Profile picture of the author cborgrx
    I believe in transparency. In the long run, it will save you a lot of aggravation and unnecessary emailing back and forth. Good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris30K
    I personally think different businesses have different needs. So i would have the customer contact you 1st .
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    • Profile picture of the author MNord
      If you start the conversation with pricing (or worse, post a "menu" of prices on your website) then you have reduced your services to a commodity.

      Some people will simply look at your prices, decide that they might get it cheaper elsewhere, and move along without ever talking to you. Most of those will never come back to give you a chance, because someone else will engage them in a discussion, learn about their needs, and explain how they provide value.

      ...The kicker is, competitors that do that will often be able to charge MORE than you--because they've connected the client's needs and desires to the value they offer. You can't do that by just stating a price.

      There are times when having "standard" pricing is expedient, but if that's always your approach you'll be limiting your sales and your margins.
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  • Profile picture of the author Highway55
    I think the customer should contact you first. People are price conscious, but a lot of times they don't see the whole spectrum of what you provide and often just hire because of price. If they speak to you first you give yourself a chance to position your services.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    When I am looking for a service, I do not trust anyone that does not give me some basic pricing info on their web site.

    Fair? Maybe not. But who cares. I want to know where the conversation begins before picking up the phone.

    Having said that, I rarely make decisions on price alone. But I will exclude companies that price themselves out of the market. And I will exclude the ones that give me nothing to go on.

    Moral of the story? If you want me as a customer (and I have a good amount of discretionary budget to spend...), give me an idea up front of what it will cost to do business with you. We can work out the details later.
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  • Profile picture of the author deekay
    Always be transparent and upfront with your payment and work terms and conditions.
    By doing so, you can filter/screen those are only interested to work with you after knowing your payment and work terms and conditions.

    You don't want to spend 30 minutes talking/chatting/emailing with an inquirer only to find out in the end that he or she doesn't agree or can't afford your rate, do you?
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  • Profile picture of the author Solvico
    It seems there are a lot of mixed views here. I agree with everyone's views but i'm going to have to make a decision eventually and choose one or the other..
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  • Profile picture of the author NK
    I've never liked having the need to contact someone to get a quote without knowing how they charge at all.

    It can be hard to give a proper price without knowing the actual requirements of a project, but having some sort of price listed does help me make my decision.

    Even some kind of basic structure would do, so I know what you're offering is within my budget and that you're not going to waste my time only for me to find out you're charging way more than what I'm willing to pay.

    It does depend on your target market, though. If you're aiming to get very high paying clients, then not having a price list could be good for you since they are often willing to pay to get a job done well. For more budget conscious market, it would probably be better to have some sort of guideline to work with, along with samples to judge.
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    • Profile picture of the author MNord
      Originally Posted by NK View Post


      It does depend on your target market, though. If you're aiming to get very high paying clients, then not having a price list could be good for you since they are often willing to pay to get a job done well. For more budget conscious market, it would probably be better to have some sort of guideline to work with, along with samples to judge.
      I think that's a great point. If you're selling pretty low-priced services anyway, posting your fees may not be a bad idea. If a client is typically worth only worth, say, $500 in all, you probably can't spend tons of time emailing back and forth or talking on the phone. Your website may have to do much of the selling for you.

      But if you're selling higher-ticket services, or a subscription/long-term contract that's worth a lot of money, I'd suggest that time spent talking with you prospects would be time well spent. Just learn how to qualify prospects quickly so you don't waste a lot of time. Maybe get a little sales training. Or head over to the offline forum on WF where there are good threads about selling.
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      • Profile picture of the author Solvico
        Originally Posted by MNord View Post

        I think that's a great point. If you're selling pretty low-priced services anyway, posting your fees may not be a bad idea. If a client is typically worth only worth, say, $500 in all, you probably can't spend tons of time emailing back and forth or talking on the phone. Your website may have to do much of the selling for you.

        But if you're selling higher-ticket services, or a subscription/long-term contract that's worth a lot of money, I'd suggest that time spent talking with you prospects would be time well spent. Just learn how to qualify prospects quickly so you don't waste a lot of time. Maybe get a little sales training. Or head over to the offline forum on WF where there are good threads about selling.
        Thanks a lot to both of you. It will be a monthly subscription service which is of high value also. I think i'll just outline the services in detail and ask potential clients to contact me with their specific requirements so I can quote them a price. As also stated above though, a brief pricing guide may be useful too.
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        • Profile picture of the author markgaperl
          You should definitely give some pricing, terms and conditions to your potential customers. Lot of the customers will not even contact you if they see no information at all. You have to strike the right balance to give them some indication of what it will cost and also indicate that for any customization you are available and willing to give a custom quote. Here is how I see it:

          - Clearly tell what you have to offer
          - Tell why this is the best in the market
          - Ask the customer for action either by selecting the offered price or contacting you for customized quote.

          Hope that helps!
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  • Profile picture of the author jrigdon73
    Maybe list prices for a few of your services. That way prospective customers can see about what you charge.
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