Is Kindle Publishing A Good Choice?

by 1alpha
23 replies
Hello. I've been revisiting thoughts of focusing on solely publishing kindle books as a long term business model and had some questions for those who are already doing so.

The reason behind this is because book publishing seems a more 'stable' endeavour than typical "IM" type business in the IM niche. I'm looking to establish a stable business to bring in a regular income of at least $2500 per month. I don't expect to hit this figure overnight, or necessarily from 1 book, and I also appreciate kindle success depends on a variety of factors.

I'd like to get feedback from any kindle publishers who are doing this figure or greater about how long it took to achieve (I have a fair bit of time to write the books, but don't necessarily want to be stuck waiting if it takes months for books to sell), the number of books published, publishing frequency, pricing strategies, giveaways, getting reviews, outsourcing, fiction or non-fiction being best etc etc.

I'm not asking for book ideas (I have ideas for multiple sci-fi short stories as well as non-fiction books in some niches I'm familiar with), but any insight into the general "what to expect" from existing publishers about income patterns and daily hassles/tasks etc would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
#choice #good #kindle #publishing
  • Profile picture of the author usoroakpan
    the only thing i will say is that kindle publishing is saturated,you might not really gain as much money as you want to make,if you want to go into it, focus on a particlar niche and be known there,thats it.
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    • Profile picture of the author TelZilla
      Originally Posted by usoroakpan View Post

      the only thing i will say is that kindle publishing is saturated,you might not really gain as much money as you want to make,if you want to go into it, focus on a particlar niche and be known there,thats it.
      Saturated? I think not.

      What makes your book a success is marketing.

      Plain and simple.

      Yes, pick a niche. Learn to write well, or at least learn how to use spell check. In other words, edit your books.

      Then you can either depend on luck and hope for the best (like 99% of kindle authors), or market the crap out of your books.

      The difference between the successful and unsuccessful kindle books almost always have something to do with marketing...
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      • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
        Originally Posted by TelZilla View Post

        Saturated? I think not.

        What makes your book a success is marketing.

        Plain and simple.

        Yes, pick a niche. Learn to write well, or at least learn how to use spell check. In other words, edit your books.

        Then you can either depend on luck and hope for the best (like 99% of kindle authors), or market the crap out of your books.

        The difference between the successful and unsuccessful kindle books almost always have something to do with marketing...
        I couldn't agree more. I would still sell the book on my own site and forget the fame (if you're looking for that). And i would raise the price - cause kindle takes a super chunk out of your profits - and you dont get the backend customer name and info.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by usoroakpan View Post

      the only thing i will say is that kindle publishing is saturated
      On the contrary: it's in its infancy, and expanding very rapidly indeed. "Saturated" couldn't be further from the truth. Kindle uptake and usage, worldwide, is in a phase of great growth, with a very long way still to go.

      .
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      • Profile picture of the author TinkBD
        Fiction is a good route to long term rewards, with a couple of provisions:

        It will take time

        There are no shortcuts

        You need to read fiction -- especially in your chosen genres, even if you think you can outsource

        Writing a lot and working smart/strategically can bring rewards surprisingly quickly

        There are a lot of writers working in undiscovered sub-sub-genres who are doing well... and running under the radar.

        There is one course and resource for fiction that knocks all of the rest out of the water. It's one of the few that I promote to my fiction list and its worth every penny. (It's not mine lol)

        PM me and I'll be happy to tell you which one it is.
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  • Profile picture of the author AStricklen
    There are certainly a lot of authors and a lot of books. If you get lucky you can make a lot from a few books, but most people churn out book after book. If you can keep up a steady pace and have great keywords, blurbs, and covers, you can do great. Find a niche and write, write, write. Set up a mailing list, website, etc and you'll make it sooner or later. Nothing is guaranteed, but there is a good possibility you can make a good income.
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  • Profile picture of the author naidyphoon
    Kindle publishing, is the closest thing you'll get to passive income, I get a sale or two every day - not much, but it can easily be scaled up and I don't have to do anything at all.

    I've gotten the same level of passivity with Udemy.
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  • Profile picture of the author SebastianAiden
    If you write well, write often, work with an editor, market decently and find a good niche then you will be successful. There are many indie authors out there making 6 figures or more a year. Now they have multiple books out there, which is key. You need to have a library of books. That way if someone buys your book and likes it then they will probably buy the rest of them. Writing a series is great.

    If you want a higher chance of success then write in either the thriller, romance, or women's lit niche. These are the top niches.

    Also realize that you need to be in it for the long term if you want to make a lot of money from it. Success very rarely happens over night and you will often need multiple books for a steady income that you can live off.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raelyn Tan
    Everything is a good option if you stick to it and become good at it. Some people argue that building websites are a great long term strategy for community building and for ranking purposes, for others it's publishing videos for constant fresh leads.. Then there's PPC campaigns where people say that they can 'spend $1 to get $2', and of course the good old building your list which can be considered long term once you load up your auto responder...

    Basically, yes if you stick to it.
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  • Profile picture of the author simooncave
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by AStricklen View Post

      There are certainly a lot of authors and a lot of books. If you get lucky you can make a lot from a few books, but most people churn out book after book. If you can keep up a steady pace and have great keywords, blurbs, and covers, you can do great. Find a niche and write, write, write. Set up a mailing list, website, etc and you'll make it sooner or later. Nothing is guaranteed, but there is a good possibility you can make a good income.
      You left out "and write something worth reading." There is too much garbage on the market from people concentrating on "great keywords, blurbs and covers" at the expense of content.

      You don't have to be Tolstoy or even Rowling, but people shouldn't feel cheated when they finish your book. I download a lot of new books on free promos, and most of them are a waste of good electrons.
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      • Profile picture of the author AStricklen
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        You left out "and write something worth reading." There is too much garbage on the market from people concentrating on "great keywords, blurbs and covers" at the expense of content.

        You don't have to be Tolstoy or even Rowling, but people shouldn't feel cheated when they finish your book. I download a lot of new books on free promos, and most of them are a waste of good electrons.
        You are dead on. There are certainly people who couldn't care less about the quality of the books they publish, but there is also the fact that anyone can publish early works that they otherwise wouldn't have had published until they had the skills. No one is good at the start, it's just that now everyone can have a look at just how bad you were.

        With that being said, yes, you should also strive to at least offer something good to those that purchase your books. Marketing with great blurbs, covers, etc will get you a lot of one time sales, but if you write well you can have customers that are waiting to buy up the next book in whatever series you are working on. That's where real money comes in, compared to people that publish garbage on a daily basis. Even worse, books that have a great introduction only, since that is the part that you can see as a preview.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Hooper
    If you're going to write a book, release it on Kindle as well as paperback. Even if you don't sell the paperback (or many of them), it will show customers that you've put in the time and they're more likely to get a good product. A lot of "Kindle-only" books are awful and customers know that.
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    There's still good money to be made on Kindle. It isn't as easy as it used to be, but I'm making what most would consider a full-time living from Kindle books.
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    • Profile picture of the author David Hooper
      Originally Posted by miklanderson2 View Post

      There's still good money to be made on Kindle. It isn't as easy as it used to be, but I'm making what most would consider a full-time living from Kindle books.
      Would love to see what you're doing. Can you post a link to something?
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      • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
        Originally Posted by David Hooper View Post

        Would love to see what you're doing. Can you post a link to something?
        Sorry, I somehow missed this question when you asked it the other day.

        I'm not going to reveal the niches I'm in or any of my books on here, but I'll be happy to answer any other questions you have. I'm writing books in multiple niches using a number of pen names. It used to be easy to write a book and get it to the top of the rankings in Amazon. Now, it can be done, but it takes a much better book and more attention to detail. Good writing, good covers and legitimate good reviews are all a must if a book is going to make it.

        I am a little concerned about the new Kindle subscription program and how it's going to impact sales for indie authors.That's part of the reason I'm venturing out into other areas. I don't want to have all of my eggs in one basket.
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  • Profile picture of the author 1alpha
    appreciate all the feedback thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by 1alpha View Post

    Hello. I've been revisiting thoughts of focusing on solely publishing kindle books as a long term business model and had some questions for those who are already doing so.

    The reason behind this is because book publishing seems a more 'stable' endeavour than typical "IM" type business in the IM niche. I'm looking to establish a stable business to bring in a regular income of at least $2500 per month. I don't expect to hit this figure overnight, or necessarily from 1 book, and I also appreciate kindle success depends on a variety of factors.

    I'd like to get feedback from any kindle publishers who are doing this figure or greater about how long it took to achieve (I have a fair bit of time to write the books, but don't necessarily want to be stuck waiting if it takes months for books to sell), the number of books published, publishing frequency, pricing strategies, giveaways, getting reviews, outsourcing, fiction or non-fiction being best etc etc.

    I'm not asking for book ideas (I have ideas for multiple sci-fi short stories as well as non-fiction books in some niches I'm familiar with), but any insight into the general "what to expect" from existing publishers about income patterns and daily hassles/tasks etc would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    I've been writing for Kindle for almost a year and since I love to write, it's been a great experience for me. Though I think the Kindle platform is going to be around for a very long time, it's still good business sense to never put all your eggs in one basket.

    Is Kindle publishing a good choice? For me it is. But is it a good choice for you? Only you can decide that.


    The best advice I can give you is this:
    • Invest in some Kindle Training. Knowing what I know now, I wish I would have done that a lot sooner. From a pure dollars and cents versus value, my two favorites are Geoff Shaw's Kindling and Bryan Kumar's Kindle Book Club. They are both at two very different price points, but they both rock!.
    • Take a long view, business-minded approach to Kindle. Though there are plenty of people who have broke 4 to 5 figures per month after just a few months, it's not the norm. You'll probably need to publish several ebooks before you start seeing any traction.
    • Connect and communicate with other Kindle authors outside of this forum. Find people who left testimonials on some of the Kindle WSOs and contact them to see where they're still at.
    I hit my "sweet spot", so to speak, after publishing my 4th ebook, simply by following what I learned from the training. So I am super glad I stuck with it.

    Don't listen to anyone who says who cannot make money on Kindle. I can't tell you how many people that I've talked to who have told me they published one or two ebooks and they weren't raking it in, so they quit. It was too much "work". And the majority of the time they didn't invest in a good, solid Kindle course.

    If I didn't like to write, I would invest time and energy to find a GREAT ghost writer and hire them to do some of my writing for me, maybe even hire a couple (or more). There are so many ways to tackle this awesome opportunity.

    Originally Posted by usoroakpan View Post

    the only thing i will say is that kindle publishing is saturated,you might not really gain as much money as you want to make,if you want to go into it, focus on a particlar niche and be known there,thats it.
    No, it's not even close to being saturated.

    How can I write that with absolute certainty? Because I know plenty of people who are making a living writing for Kindle, many of whom just started out earlier this year. And they are doing it across different genres.

    Kindle e-book sales have already surpassed hard cover and soft cover books. They are also projected to grow well beyond past 2026.

    With the right training, the right business mindset, and work ethic, I think you can create a great passive income money machine IF you're willing to put in the work in the beginning.

    RoD
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe Lumbergh
    Well put Rod!
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  • Profile picture of the author JeanneLynn
    My older son wrote 6 full length books (ranging in size from 182 pages to 870 pages) and they've been up on Amazon for a while. He made $6.55 this month total. My younger son wrote 3 books and he's made $2.00 total in the last month. It can be hard to get someone to make a purchase with so many books to choose from.

    I'm an avid Kindle reader and there are some really bad books on Kindle right now. I read one last night that was obviously churned out by someone with a terrible grasp of the English language. I think that Amazon needs to crack down on some of these horribly written books.

    If you can write well and you enjoy writing as a hobby, I'd give it a try, but I don't think it's as easy to make money with Kindle books as some people say.
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    • Profile picture of the author TinkBD
      JeanneLynn - Kudos to your sons for writing and publishing... I am sorry their results have been disappointing.

      In a nutshell, the folks who are doing well in Kindle fiction are finding a good sub-genre, writing to market and writing in Series or, depending on the sub-genre, writing Serials.

      It is as much STRATEGY, as it is INSPIRATION ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author mjsing3r
    You should check out Hugh Howey's blog. His writing career took off after publishing a series of novellas on Kindle that eventually became the novel WOOL. He implemented a lot of marketing tactics to build up a following and now he's a New York Times Bestselling Author who just sold movie rights to Ridley Scott.

    Now, obviously that's not typical. There's a certain amount of luck involved in becoming a bestselling author. But the right marketing plan can help out a lot.

    Anyway, I recommend looking at his blog because he touches on self-publishing quite a bit. He foresees the indie writing community eventually becoming something similar to the current indie music scene. His posts are really interesting and he's very active. Definitely worth checking out. I'd also suggest reading WOOL if you're into reading fiction. It's excellent.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mormo
      I got a book on Kindle and so far have sold one copy and haven't received a payment yet.

      Still, there it is in my asset column so I consider it time and money well spent.
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  • Profile picture of the author seobro
    Kindle unlimited will change your game. All the book you want for only $9.95 per month is super max. Expect many more gazers or viewers. Reading is moving into the 21st century just now. Typically, I get hundreds of downloads every day and that will now increase.
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