Do info products really teach?

33 replies
Hi as some of you may know I am venturing into product creation.

What frustrates me is that it is clear some vendors put products out there simply to make an income steam.

The usual is purchase a product for say $7 and the info within is kind of you need to do this and that but not exactly a system of how to do it or put it in place.

In the long run I think this would be harmful to product creators who do this, why sell something just to make a quick buck?

Why not create actionable step by step products that achieves the customers desired outcome instead of them being more frustrated and left with more questions after they have Purchased?

For me personally I would feel better inside to create a product that gives a customer a complete start to finish guide on how to do something, knowing that if they take action they will actually obtain the outcome that they purchased the info product for.

What are your thoughts and input on this topic?
#info #products #teach
  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    Those who sell products that are sub-par are leaving a lot of money on the table. They might make a quick buck, but they aren't going to make more than that when their customers find out they've been duped. I've purchased a handful of products that had great sales pages, but the products were a joke. The people who made them lost me as a customer, as I'm sure they lost anyone else who bought their product.
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    • Profile picture of the author Phil Steptoe
      Originally Posted by miklanderson2 View Post

      Those who sell products that are sub-par are leaving a lot of money on the table. They might make a quick buck, but they aren't going to make more than that when their customers find out they've been duped. I've purchased a handful of products that had great sales pages, but the products were a joke. The people who made them lost me as a customer, as I'm sure they lost anyone else who bought their product.
      This is 100% nail on the head. If YOU wouldn't pay great money for it, don't bother selling it. That's my golden rule.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kecia
    The good products out there DO teach the reader how to reach their end goal. Are all of them good? Certainly not. That's why you have to be careful where you spend your money. Look for unbiased reviews of the products or only purchase from people that you trust (or those that you trust to recommend good products to you).
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    You seem to want to paint with a very broad brush. It's simple really. Some people produce quality stuff while others are quick hit artists. This ain't exactly news. It's been going on since tribal types first exchanged shiny stones for buffalo hides or whatever was available...
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Razor
    There are plenty of good info products, you just need to look for reviews and by that I mean real reviews from real customers.
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  • It all just depends on the product.

    Certain product creators will skip certain areas of the system they're teaching because it is too simple. Of course, there are people who won't give their all in the info product they are teaching, and they try to make you buy their OTOs.

    This is what's most annoying.

    I think OTOs have their place, but I feel like plenty of WSO sellers abuse by having one upsell, then another downsell, and another upsell before actually getting the product.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dave Espino
      Info-products are valuable to the extent that they lay out a solution and show step-by-step, how to solve the specific problem that it's supposed to solve.

      When creating my own info-products, my goal is simple... if I were to buy my own product, would I be extremely happy with it? (and after 15 years of buying products, I have some strong filters and very high standards)

      I can't stand products that either don't lay out the basic problem / strategy. They just go straight into the steps that you are supposed to take, without giving you any preparatory info.

      We owe our customers a good, solid product - that's what we'd want, if we were buying...

      Dave
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      • Profile picture of the author MrFume
        I see what you are driving at, and of course there is variation in the teaching quality of any information product. Video, audio, Text & graphics all the tools needed to demonstrate and illustrate a point are not always strong points with the creators. There is another dimension to info products, and that is the intelligence, or aptitude of your audience - you make the most effective teaching aid, the best lecture, the best video possible but if someone is not able to understand it well...it won't work for them! Often people do not like to admit they don't have the aptitude to achieve particular results - we all arrive at a given info product with a specific perspective, if a customer's is not congruent with the level of understanding necessary to achieve the outcome, what usually happens? They blame the product and seek a refund! I am just saying it is not all about the product, the customer's aptitude plays a big part.
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      • Profile picture of the author winebaer
        Originally Posted by Dave Espino View Post

        Info-products are valuable to the extent that they lay out a solution and show step-by-step, how to solve the specific problem that it's supposed to solve.

        When creating my own info-products, my goal is simple... if I were to buy my own product, would I be extremely happy with it? (and after 15 years of buying products, I have some strong filters and very high standards)

        I can't stand products that either don't lay out the basic problem / strategy. They just go straight into the steps that you are supposed to take, without giving you any preparatory info.

        We owe our customers a good, solid product - that's what we'd want, if we were buying...

        Dave
        I have to agree with Dave (and not just because he has a great name)...

        Info products that succeed need to present a clear solution to a real (not fabricated) problem.

        And, as for the pricing issue, there are plenty who way over-deliver even at the low entry point of $7 - because they can use this product as a lead mechanism or trust mechanism to sell more on the backend, either through OTOs (as already mentioned) or by developing a relationship with a list. And many product creators use that low price in conjunction with giving away the profits on the sales to affiliates in order to build that list.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by ADavidson View Post

    In the long run I think this would be harmful to product creators who do this
    I don't disagree with you. But you're taking a long-term and perhaps collective view which is beyond many of the people doing that.

    Originally Posted by ADavidson View Post

    why sell something just to make a quick buck?
    Well, to some extent that's their "business model" because it's what they've been taught.

    And for some of them, to some extent, in the short-term (which is often all they plan for), it can actually work quite well. Some of the people who do that actually make their first real income from it, sometimes after having tried many other things unsuccessfully in the past. So within their frame of reference it's "successful", I think.

    Originally Posted by ADavidson View Post

    For me personally I would feel better inside to create a product that gives a customer a complete start to finish guide on how to do something, knowing that if they take action they will actually obtain the outcome that they purchased the info product for.
    So would I. But in the market you're talking about, many of these things are IM-related and MMO-related products, and the people to whom they're sold (many of them, themselves, in "emerging markets") typically have almost no online income at all, and $7 is "their price-bracket".

    Also, many things like that are WSO's specifically (or very similar things), and you have to bear in mind that over the last 3-4 years, the WSO sellers have - collectively - so completely and comprehensively shot themselves in the foot by price-cutting, and constantly competing on price with each other, that they've nearly destroyed the market for anything "better". They have, however, created/attracted a substantial market for very-low-cost, poor-quality products (among which there are undoubtedly also some "better things" struggling to emerge from the mass market).

    .
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    • Profile picture of the author helpinghand182
      I was totally put off from product creation for years due to the quality of some of the ones I came across.

      I thought the whole thing was a little sleazy to be honest. The more experience I got developing my own business models along with gaining the knowledge to spot the difference between the golden nuggets and the "quick hitters" as someone pointed out - you do get used to spotting the ones that "teach" and the ones that "trick".

      What I think is really awesome is the ones that get a mastermind/community group going as there is then potential to learn so much off other like minded members!
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    • Profile picture of the author Chris Worner
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post


      Also, many things like that are WSO's specifically (or very similar things), and you have to bear in mind that over the last 3-4 years, the WSO sellers have - collectively - so completely and comprehensively shot themselves in the foot by price-cutting, and constantly competing on price with each other, that they've nearly destroyed the market for anything "better". They have, however, created/attracted a substantial market for very-low-cost, poor-quality products (among which there are undoubtedly also some "better things" struggling to emerge from the mass market).
      I will never forget the day I saw a WSO seller offering a money-back guarantee on a $1 WSO.

      Yes, you read that correctly, a money-back guarantee on a $1 WSO!

      -Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author oadvantage
    From my experience this market is like all other markets.

    1. There are some great products that can get you great results and give you that "Epiphany".

    2. There are some bad products.

    You will find this in every niche from breakfast cereal to make money products.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMToThePoint
    I agree with what you are all saying but my main point is that whoever is creating a product that the end goal should be an actionable product that a customer can get the desired outcome from
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      Originally Posted by ADavidson View Post

      I agree with what you are all saying but my main point is that whoever is creating a product that the end goal should be an actionable product that a customer can get the desired outcome from

      Yes. Just do it. You can't control the products that others release. You can make your own products great by doing what you say.

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim Franklin
    You know I have seen some products that were good info products and some that were obviously shake and bake, One of the most simple explanations might be that not everyone is cut out to actually teach about a subject.

    Another one might be that if you are not fully immersed in a subject it is difficult to lead others.

    The final but somewhat depressing thought, is that some product creators just do not care enough about the product they are creating to put the effort into the product to make it really good.
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  • Profile picture of the author WilliamVillagran
    It really depends on who you buy products from. I always look at reviews before I buy any products. Some products will work but some just leave out too much information.
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  • Profile picture of the author daym
    According to as far as I know, almost any seller will just give you the pieces for a hard puzzle

    You'll have to figure it out, at the end anyway. However, the cheap "methods" are great because they teach you where to get started. That's all an IMer needs.
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  • Profile picture of the author illusioztan
    Originally Posted by ADavidson View Post

    Hi as some of you may know I am venturing into product creation.

    What frustrates me is that it is clear some vendors put products out there simply to make an income steam.

    The usual is purchase a product for say $7 and the info within is kind of you need to do this and that but not exactly a system of how to do it or put it in place.

    In the long run I think this would be harmful to product creators who do this, why sell something just to make a quick buck?

    Why not create actionable step by step products that achieves the customers desired outcome instead of them being more frustrated and left with more questions after they have Purchased?

    For me personally I would feel better inside to create a product that gives a customer a complete start to finish guide on how to do something, knowing that if they take action they will actually obtain the outcome that they purchased the info product for.

    What are your thoughts and input on this topic?

    Hi, I agree with you. The real aim of a product is to help others succeed in their goal and not to mislead them. We make money, but we should fulfill our customer's requirement as well
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  • Profile picture of the author markgaperl
    There are definitely some good info products out there that teach. But there is loads of bad products as well. Newbies normally get sucked into the wrong products as they are generally the most shiny and sell the dream. Be careful and read reviews before falling into a trap.
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    • Profile picture of the author image89
      There are many great info products that I have obtained that have great value. It is always important to check reviews from other people that have read the material, and this will help you make a decision as whether or not to buy the product.
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  • Profile picture of the author JensSteyaert
    Yes there are definately products out there (from big names even) who are solf for $7 but don't teach a thing. Theey are just lead magnets to get you in their funnel and upsell higher priced products.

    One tip i can give you: check out the JV page of the product and check out their funnel. If the $7 product is followed by multiple products priced at $27+ then the $7 report will be a big disappointment.
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  • Profile picture of the author jamescanz
    Originally Posted by ADavidson View Post

    In the long run I think this would be harmful to product creators who do this, why sell something just to make a quick buck?
    Well, if that is the kind of mindset...

    Then I guess I could see how it could be 'harmful'

    However, making a quick buck off of small ticket products is never, ever, never my main priority...

    It's more so a nice little cherry on top.

    (can't speak for everyone tho)
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  • Profile picture of the author elusian
    Always give value. In fact over deliver. Those who create poorly formed products that offer no value may get the initial sale but the trust that the customer has in them will soon turn sour. In addition those type of vendors very quickly get a bad reputation and affiliates will simply stop promoting their products.
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  • Profile picture of the author unreal
    It depends on the person who create them if he produce quality then you will learn if he produce rehashed info you will suffer
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  • Profile picture of the author paulie123
    In theory, they are supposed to! You should come away with theoretical knowledge and practical, functional knowledge! The what, where's, why's and how-to of something.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nightengale
      I have bought literally tens of thousands of dollars of info products and coaching. I've paid BIG bucks for it, so I have some experience with this as a buyer. (Almost none of it has been here on the WF.)

      As others have mentioned, of course some products aren't worth the paper they're written on, and some are worth far more than their price tag.

      JensSteyaert hit it:

      Many times, a low-priced product ($7) is just an entry-level, introduction designed to upsell you into a more expensive course or program. The point is to build a list of buyers instead of freebie-seekers.

      It's a solid strategy for many reasons.

      Generally, a low-priced product like this is designed to tell you the "what" but not the "how." I don't know what you bought, but low-priced products like these are by nature, often designed to be somewhat general. Detailed, how-to info is typically much more expensive.

      Be careful that you're not expecting too much for your money. In my own business, almost nothing is worth $7. Either it's grossly underpriced (which makes me suspicious of it), or it's not worth having at all. However, I recognize a low-priced entry-level offer when I see it and fully expect to be upsold once I've purchased said $7 offer. Assuming I'm otherwise interested in what that person offers, I'll bite.

      But I can't think of any stand-alone offer priced at $7 which is worth having.

      Everyone else's points are valid, but mostly aimed at Warriors. The WF is a very insular community, much of it made up of IMers selling to other IMers. It's incestuous and I stay away from that like the plague. I've bought very few things here in my more than 10 years here. And complete IM newbies are NOT my market at all. I don't sell to Warriors.

      Alexa makes excellent points. It's mostly broke newbies who are selling $7 stuff and they've cannibalized their own market by always competing on price. They have no business and I don't trust anything they sell.

      Remember, there are certain situations where low prices actually HURT you. Think about a Ferrarri. You can't sell a Ferrarri for $20K. People would be instantly suspicious and distrust you. The price tag is part of the status symbol. If you charge only $20K, you kill the status symbol of buying a Ferrarri.

      Same thing goes for jewelry from Tiffany's. You wouldn't trust me if I tried to sell you a diamond tennis bracelet from Tiffany's for $50, right?

      The same is true in a lot of different markets for a lot of different products and services. In my case, I paid my own business coach a hefty amount of money for her coaching. Given her experience and area of expertise, I would have been suspicious if she'd charged only $50 for her coaching. (I paid her over $12K over a 2-year period.)

      That doesn't count the high-priced courses I purchased, including Ali Brown's "Online Success Blueprint" ($1500 -- which I bought TWICE), Jeff Walker's "Product Launch Formula" ($2K), Lisa Sasevich's "6-Figure Teleseminar Secrets" ($1K), etc. Plus the multitude of smaller e-books and audios.

      Wouldn't YOU be suspicious if someone were selling you serious business-building information for only $7???

      You should be. Those people immediately blow their own credibility with these kinds of offers.

      I'm not talking about introductory $7 offers designed to build a list of buyers and then immediately upsell them something more expensive. I'm knowledgeable enough that I can usually spot that. I'm talking about stand-alone products that promise the world for $7. (Ha!)

      My advice is to get serious. (And get OFF the WF! I found the best info off of this site.) If you really want to build a real business, get serious and invest some real money. A few $7 e-books is laughable.

      Hope that helps!

      Michelle
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  • Profile picture of the author pxjenkins
    speaking as a nascent product creator, my feeling about this is that because information is constantly shifting, the best quality products will be the ones that allow for ongoing development.

    In truth, everyone is going to have their own individual take or system on something; the question is, the degree of transparency regarding this and regarding the extent to which a product can solve a specific problem.

    Those seeking to make fast bucks with one-hit wonders can always pump out a deceptive product; but this is hardly long-term or even medium-term business strategy!
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  • Profile picture of the author sathuri
    Have bought $1 - $97 products myself , many of these are simply useless stuff , but there are
    some which give you good advice and guide you to make some bucks really good enough
    money to quit the RatRace , but you need to put some work and wait till you get results (because "Rome was not built in a day")
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  • Profile picture of the author digitalsapien
    Some products are worthy of your dollars and some are not. You just have to be very keen in examining the sources of these products.
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  • Profile picture of the author @tjr
    I smell someone trying to establish their "personality" ahead of a product launch...

    No need to circlejerk about what other people are or aren't doing. Just do your thing.
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