How could I find a part-time job if I'm Self Educating?

by tdk13
17 replies
Here's my situation, I'm 21 years old, I live with my mum, ideally I would like to work part-time, and focus the rest of my time and energy on my own hobbies and interests, mostly on getting my online business up and running.

However I'm not sure how I would explain to employers that I am 'Self-Educating' with the rest of my time, or even if they would want to hire someone who is studying to become an entrepreneur, in case I might not stick around for long, or to even be taken seriously.

Should I just pretend that I'm studying some kind of proper course online, or should I just be honest?

I'm just really un-sure how I should approach this situation. Any thoughts or idea's would be appreciated. Thanks!
#educating #find #job #parttime
  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    Originally Posted by tdk13 View Post

    Here's my situation, I'm 21 years old, I live with my mum, ideally I would like to work part-time, and focus the rest of my time and energy on my own hobbies and interests, mostly on getting my online business up and running.

    However I'm not sure how I would explain to employers that I am 'Self-Educating' with the rest of my time, or even if they would want to hire someone who is studying to become an entrepreneur, in case I might not stick around for long. Or to even be taken seriously.

    Should I just pretend that I'm studying some kind of proper course online, or should I just be honest?

    I'm just really un-sure how I should approach this situation. Any thoughts or idea's would be appreciated. Thanks!
    You come across as someone who doesn't want to work... I guess you could say none of us really want to work, but you're talking about an employer-employee relationship so that's not really sending a good message.

    I interview a lot of people who describe themselves as "entrepreneurial" - most of them come across as lazy, a few come across as very bright individuals who have clearly defined goals, but none of them get hired. Mainly because unless the position is specifically designed to be short term, I don't want to invest in someone who doesn't want to invest in the company.

    I think before you go any further down this path, you need to define what it means to be an entrepreneur. If you picture yourself effortlessly making money while hanging out with your friends, you'll never reach that goal. True Entrepreneurs work harder and commit longer hours than everyone doing the 9 to 5. You'll spend very little time with your friends, if any at all. Your hobbies and side interests will take a back seat toward reaching your goal. You won't take vacations - at least not without your laptop in tow, spending some amount of time every day to manage the business you're building.

    If you ask around, you will find very few entrepreneurs who didn't spend years working regular jobs first. If you don't understand how the corporate world thinks (by being a part of it, not just reading pitchy articles about "being your own boss"), you'll never understand how to compete in it.

    Don't "tell your employer you're studying some course" ... actually do it. There is nothing impressive about being "self taught" unless you're already a multi-millionaire when you tell the story.
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    • Profile picture of the author moneywithtim
      Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

      You come across as someone who doesn't want to work... I guess you could say none of us really want to work, but you're talking about an employer-employee relationship so that's not really sending a good message.

      I interview a lot of people who describe themselves as "entrepreneurial" - most of them come across as lazy, a few come across as very bright individuals who have clearly defined goals, but none of them get hired. Mainly because unless the position is specifically designed to be short term, I don't want to invest in someone who doesn't want to invest in the company.

      I think before you go any further down this path, you need to define what it means to be an entrepreneur. If you picture yourself effortlessly making money while hanging out with your friends, you'll never reach that goal. True Entrepreneurs work harder and commit longer hours than everyone doing the 9 to 5. You'll spend very little time with your friends, if any at all. Your hobbies and side interests will take a back seat toward reaching your goal. You won't take vacations - at least not without your laptop in tow, spending some amount of time every day to manage the business you're building.

      If you ask around, you will find very few entrepreneurs who didn't spend years working regular jobs first. If you don't understand how the corporate world thinks (by being a part of it, not just reading pitchy articles about "being your own boss"), you'll never understand how to compete in it.

      Don't "tell your employer you're studying some course" ... actually do it.
      This is the information you HAVE to use! Inspiral!
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    • Profile picture of the author tdk13
      Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

      You come across as someone who doesn't want to work... I guess you could say none of us really want to work, but you're talking about an employer-employee relationship so that's not really sending a good message.

      I interview a lot of people who describe themselves as "entrepreneurial" - most of them come across as lazy, a few come across as very bright individuals who have clearly defined goals, but none of them get hired. Mainly because unless the position is specifically designed to be short term, I don't want to invest in someone who doesn't want to invest in the company.

      I think before you go any further down this path, you need to define what it means to be an entrepreneur. If you picture yourself effortlessly making money while hanging out with your friends, you'll never reach that goal. True Entrepreneurs work harder and commit longer hours than everyone doing the 9 to 5. You'll spend very little time with your friends, if any at all. Your hobbies and side interests will take a back seat toward reaching your goal. You won't take vacations - at least not without your laptop in tow, spending some amount of time every day to manage the business you're building.

      If you ask around, you will find very few entrepreneurs who didn't spend years working regular jobs first. If you don't understand how the corporate world thinks (by being a part of it, not just reading pitchy articles about "being your own boss"), you'll never understand how to compete in it.

      Don't "tell your employer you're studying some course" ... actually do it. There is nothing impressive about being "self taught" unless you're already a multi-millionaire when you tell the story.
      I don't know how I gave off that impression, I am prepared to work very hard for this.
      It's just.. I really need a side job in order to afford some things that I need to buy.

      I feel like my situation gives me a lot of freedom, and I would rather use that freedom to pursue my own path, rather than work a full time job where I feel unsatisfied and trapped, I have little time to pursue my carreer of choice, little time for self improvement, it would feel like I was just going backwards. It feels completely un-necessary, a part-time job would handle my money problems just fine.

      I am starting a kind of self development endeavour, I plan on coaching and also selling info-products.

      I'm not sure how I would benefit from working for someone else full-time, and learning that world, when this world seems like it would be different?
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      • Profile picture of the author ronrule
        Originally Posted by tdk13 View Post

        I don't know how I gave off that impression, I am prepared to work very hard for this.
        It's just.. I really need a side job in order to afford some things that I need to buy.

        I feel like my situation gives me a lot of freedom, and I would rather use that freedom to pursue my own path, rather than work a full time job where I feel unsatisfied and trapped, I have little time to pursue my carreer of choice, little time for self improvement, it would feel like I was just going backwards. It feels completely un-necessary, a part-time job would handle my money problems just fine.

        I am starting a kind of self development endeavour, I plan on coaching and also selling info-products.
        What kind of coaching? I mean, don't take this the wrong way, you're asking the kinds of questions I would expect from someone in your age group who either was about to graduate high school or college (or didn't attend) and didn't really want to get a job. With such an entry level question on the board, I question what you could intend to coach anyone on. People turn to coaches when they want to learn from an expert who's already done it. You haven't done anything - you're still trying to figure out how to balance a job, hanging out with your friends, and learning this world.

        I know that sounds like a rude answer, but I'm being sincere about helping you try to manage your expectations here.

        I'm not sure how I would benefit from working for someone else full-time, and learning that world, when this world seems like a completely separate thing?
        If you aren't sure how you would benefit from it, you're kind of making my point. You don't know what you're up against. You don't have the years of experience that comes with understanding why things are done the way they're done.

        Here's an example; ever notice how chaotic the boarding process is when you're trying to get on a plane? I mean, it doesn't make any freakin sense. They load the first class passengers first, who are in the front of the plane, then everyone else has to squeeze by them while they sit around twiddling their thumbs. Then the coach passengers get in and it's even more chaotic, with people stuffing their luggage into the overhead compartments and people having to get up and stand in the isle because they were seated before someone with a window seat in their row, etc.

        So you're sitting there watching all this and thinking to yourself "Why don't they just board everyone back to front, that would solve everything." On paper it makes sense. You could even make a little animation showing how smooth it would be. But in actual practice, it doesn't work - people arrive at the terminal at different times, different sized luggage, people switch seats to continue conversations, etc. You would know these things if you had been in the industry, and in the end would probably have designed a zone-based boarding process that works exactly how most airlines do it now. But being an infrequent flyer, or an "armchair engineer", you don't have that working knowledge of human behavior. You simply don't have the experience to make an informed decision.

        Business works the same way, man. You can't make good business processes unless you've experienced bad ones. You can't make great products unless you've used inferior ones. You can't be a good manager - whether that's managing people or managing product development - unless you've worked for good and bad managers and observed the differences in how those management styles affected the performance of yourself and your coworkers. And you can't reasonably compete against people who have those processes tested and perfected unless you've done it too.

        What do you have to offer that I can't get from someone who's been doing it for ten years?

        Absolutely nothing.

        But ... what do you have to offer as someone who's been in the trenches doing it "the old way" for ten years, and pioneered a better way? A lot. That's what sells. That's what makes you valuable and will make people want to buy your products. If I told you how you could create a product, produce an infomercial, buy media, etc., what is that info worth if I'm just some unknown dude on the Internet? But if I'm a C-Level executive at As Seen On TV, suddenly that exact same information is immensely more credible because there's a history and proven track record there that only someone who's "done it" would truly understand.

        My point is this; there's a distinct link between the IM world and the business world. The #1 thing that sells IM products is the ability to escape the "rat race" world. If you don't have any actual knowledge of your audience's world, can you reasonably expect to compete in this one?

        Find a job, and be the best employee you can be. Learn what you can about that business - even if you think there is no application in the IM world, you'll find within 6 months that you're wrong. Don't mention your entrepreneurial aspirations or what you intend to be one day ... focus on what your skills and abilities are NOW, that will help the employer achieve THEIR goals. That's really what an employer is looking for. Learn the ropes, learn the processes, learn how they handle their accounting and customer relationships and everything you can. Do the job you're hired to do and show a willingness to learn other areas of the business. Then you've got a story... how you started at the bottom and worked your way up in a company. THAT will sell more books than another SEO course.
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        • Profile picture of the author tdk13
          Originally Posted by ronrule View Post

          What kind of coaching? I mean, don't take this the wrong way, you're asking the kinds of questions I would expect from someone in your age group who either was about to graduate high school or college (or didn't attend) and didn't really want to get a job. With such an entry level question on the board, I question what you could intend to coach anyone on. People turn to coaches when they want to learn from an expert who's already done it. You haven't done anything - you're still trying to figure out how to balance a job, hanging out with your friends, and learning this world.

          I know that sounds like a rude answer, but I'm being sincere about helping you try to manage your expectations here.



          If you aren't sure how you would benefit from it, you're kind of making my point. You don't know what you're up against. You don't have the years of experience that comes with understanding why things are done the way they're done.

          Here's an example; ever notice how chaotic the boarding process is when you're trying to get on a plane? I mean, it doesn't make any freakin sense. They load the first class passengers first, who are in the front of the plane, then everyone else has to squeeze by them while they sit around twiddling their thumbs. Then the coach passengers get in and it's even more chaotic, with people stuffing their luggage into the overhead compartments and people having to get up and stand in the isle because they were seated before someone with a window seat in their row, etc.

          So you're sitting there watching all this and thinking to yourself "Why don't they just board everyone back to front, that would solve everything." On paper it makes sense. You could even make a little animation showing how smooth it would be. But in actual practice, it doesn't work - people arrive at the terminal at different times, different sized luggage, people switch seats to continue conversations, etc. You would know these things if you had been in the industry, and in the end would probably have designed a zone-based boarding process that works exactly how most airlines do it now. But being an infrequent flyer, or an "armchair engineer", you don't have that working knowledge of human behavior. You simply don't have the experience to make an informed decision.

          Business works the same way, man. You can't make good business processes unless you've experienced bad ones. You can't make great products unless you've used inferior ones. You can't be a good manager - whether that's managing people or managing product development - unless you've worked for good and bad managers and observed the differences in how those management styles affected the performance of yourself and your coworkers. And you can't reasonably compete against people who have those processes tested and perfected unless you've done it too.

          What do you have to offer that I can't get from someone who's been doing it for ten years?

          Absolutely nothing.

          But ... what do you have to offer as someone who's been in the trenches doing it "the old way" for ten years, and pioneered a better way? A lot. That's what sells. That's what makes you valuable and will make people want to buy your products. If I told you how you could create a product, produce an infomercial, buy media, etc., what is that info worth if I'm just some unknown dude on the Internet? But if I'm a C-Level executive at As Seen On TV, suddenly that exact same information is immensely more credible because there's a history and proven track record there that only someone who's "done it" would truly understand.

          My point is this; there's a distinct link between the IM world and the business world. The #1 thing that sells IM products is the ability to escape the "rat race" world. If you don't have any actual knowledge of your audience's world, can you reasonably expect to compete in this one?

          Find a job, and be the best employee you can be. Learn what you can about that business - even if you think there is no application in the IM world, you'll find within 6 months that you're wrong. Don't mention your entrepreneurial aspirations or what you intend to be one day ... focus on what your skills and abilities are NOW, that will help the employer achieve THEIR goals. That's really what an employer is looking for. Learn the ropes, learn the processes, learn how they handle their accounting and customer relationships and everything you can. Do the job you're hired to do and show a willingness to learn other areas of the business. Then you've got a story... how you started at the bottom and worked your way up in a company. THAT will sell more books than another SEO course.
          Hm, well if you think that would be the best course of direction for me.. then I will heavily consider it.

          Keen to get a few other opinions on the subject at hand too.

          I always thought that a good teacher would be to just keep trying and failing, and to seek out mentors and good resources.

          With what you suggested, I think that I would also benefit from selectively picking a job that would have as many relations to my endeavour as possible, if I do decide that it's the best course of action for me to take.

          You're right.. I don't want to work full time (for someone else).. I just want to focus on my own endeavours!

          However if people think that it's something I would benefit from then I'm prepared to do that.

          I've never really had anyone to talk to about this stuff with so that might be why I'm asking all the newbie questions.

          I'm glad I decided to sign up to this forum, I don't know why I didn't sign up earlier!

          For those that are interested, I am working on a place to help people (who are seeking) kind of get back in touch with their core selves, underneath all the conditioning and bullshit, a path of self-realization. I am very passionate about walking my own path of self-discovery, and helping other people with theirs.

          However this is just an idea, a concept, I haven't actually finished building it up yet, so I wouldn't know how good or bad this idea is. Thus, I welcome all criticism.

          In one way or another however, this is what I am going to do with my life.

          I was quite happy to just get a part time job, and focus the rest of my energy on that.

          However if there's a better way of approaching this (e.g. working full-time at a yoga centre and learning the business, or something similar, then I would be happy to walk that path (or even you know, working full-time at another business that is not related to self-realisation?))

          I am prepared to do whatever it takes!
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          • Profile picture of the author ronrule
            Originally Posted by tdk13 View Post

            Hm, well if you think that would be the best course of direction for me.. then I will heavily consider it.

            Keen to get a few other opinions on the subject at hand too.

            I always thought that a good teacher would be to just keep trying and failing, and to seek out mentors and good resources.

            With what you suggested, I think that I would also benefit from selectively picking a job that would have as many relations to my endeavour as possible, if I do decide that it's the best course of action for me to take.

            You're right.. I don't want to work full time (for someone else).. I just want to focus on my own endeavours!

            However if people think that it's something I would benefit from then I'm prepared to do that.

            I've never really had anyone to talk to about this stuff with so that might be why I'm asking all the newbie questions.

            I'm glad I decided to sign up to this forum, I don't know why I didn't sign up earlier!

            For those that are interested, I am working on a place to help people (who are seeking) kind of get back in touch with their core selves, underneath all the conditioning and bullshit, a path of self-realization. I am very passionate about walking my own path of self-discovery, and helping other people with their own.

            However this is just an idea, a concept, I haven't actually finished building it up yet, so I wouldn't know how good or bad this idea is. Thus, I welcome all criticism.

            In one way or another however, this is what I am going to do with my life.

            I was quite happy to just get a part time job, and focus the rest of my energy on that.

            However if there's a better way of approaching this (e.g. working full-time at a yoga centre and learning the business, or something similar, then I would be happy to walk that path (or even you know, working full-time at another business that is not related to self-realisation?)).

            I am prepared to do whatever it takes!
            That's the spirit

            Have you thought about working for a local (etablished) non-profit or rehab center? You would pick up a ton of insight into this area working with victims - drug and alcohol addiction, rape and domestic abuse victims, etc. Not only would it be a great lesson in self-improvement and life management techniques that you can learn from and share, but it also gives you credibility in the field.

            Heck, you might find you actually like going to work every day. But regardless, I know if I was traveling down the self-realization path, I'd be more apt to buy a book from someone who had served for years as a grief counselor and helped the people at the absolute lowest points in their life a person can be - they could could certainly help normal old me do better. That's worth a lot more than the words of an unknown, self-taught author.
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  • Profile picture of the author ZephyrIon
    Learn by spending other peoples money.
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  • Profile picture of the author moneywithtim
    Visit google, typ in European Jobs.. working great! Or visit Linkedin Groups!
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  • Profile picture of the author tdk13
    Bump, so I'm still interested in going with my original plan, or at least, to get some part time work, and then use the rest of my time to decide how I can actively go about this, and what is the best way for (me) to go about it.

    Would appreciate more thoughts on the original idea, I really don't want to lie on my resume.

    I was thinking something like this:

    (Rough copy and an idea of how I could convey it to employers)

    "Currently I am studying Online Business and Marketing, I still have 2 years left to complete my studies.
    This is something I am passionate about and what I am going to do with my life in the long-run, however I would also really enjoy some part-time work to support me on the side.
    I will be the best worker that I can be, devoting my full attention to the job at hand. I am a very positive and friendly person. I am flexible, as I am studying online."

    Or perhaps I could make it seem more professional-like, and just treat it as if it were a course that I am studying. (Like every other person that applies for part-time work).

    Kind Regards,
    David
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  • Profile picture of the author ronrule
    Don't mention your future corporate ambitions or refer to the job you're seeking as something "on the side" ... those conversations come later once you're already in and established. You're just a guy looking for part time work in an industry you're interested in while you're going to school. That's all you have to say.
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  • Profile picture of the author Trey Morgan
    I don't believe you're required to tell them anything about your interests in creating an online business. What you do outside of your job is nobody's business. Just let them know that you're interested in the job.
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  • I can understand why you see this as a problem, and I would, however I think it's actually a great thing. People want to hire people that are hungry, and motivated. Test. The worst thing that can happen is...nothing

    Good luck
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    • Profile picture of the author mb7861
      There are couple of points I want to share:

      1. You should go with a job where you will learn something that will be useful in your future business.

      2.I think you should not be completely honest with your employer with that I mean that don't lie but don't be an open book because employers don't like to hire people who want to start business in future. Don't tell about your plans. Just come up as somebody genuinely interested in that job and would do passionately.
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  • Profile picture of the author borsaronero
    Originally Posted by tdk13 View Post

    Here's my situation, I'm 21 years old, I live with my mum, ideally I would like to work part-time, and focus the rest of my time and energy on my own hobbies and interests, mostly on getting my online business up and running.

    However I'm not sure how I would explain to employers that I am 'Self-Educating' with the rest of my time, or even if they would want to hire someone who is studying to become an entrepreneur, in case I might not stick around for long, or to even be taken seriously.

    Should I just pretend that I'm studying some kind of proper course online, or should I just be honest?

    I'm just really un-sure how I should approach this situation. Any thoughts or idea's would be appreciated. Thanks!
    Why don't you start with an online job, like copywriting, write for others, or do something you know how to do it, and so get the money you need to start your own work?
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  • Profile picture of the author gmarklin
    Take a course in internet marketing, you will be learning something useful. while working part time.

    Working part time is not going to produce a sterling high paying job, so be honest with you perspective employer. Tell him you are taking a course at school
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  • Profile picture of the author Victor Edson
    If you're serious about entrepreneurship and not just dreaming about it... I'd say get a job doing something that improves your skillset. If you want to work online, look into sales or marketing and tell them... you're passionate about sales and being the best sales person they've got.

    Then learn everything you can and apply that to your own business.

    There's no need to tell them you want to work for yourself one day, and there's really no need to look for part time work. Go full time and get serious about your life for a little while. Your investment capital will grow a lot faster and people will take you more seriously if you're looking for full time work.

    I want to work part time so I can spend time on my hobbies sounds like you'd be showing up to punch a time clock and complain about server lag on your mmorpg.. know what I mean?

    At least that's how it reads here 'on paper' and not what you want to be perceived as if you want someone to consider hiring you.
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  • Profile picture of the author hometutor
    I almost didn't comment, but here's what I read

    You live with your mum
    You have no job
    You're quite possibly too lazy to take any actual education classes preferring to surf the internet and learn that way instead
    You want an online business because you probably think online marketing is easy

    Did I cover this and help you to look at yourself?

    Rick
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