Want to Start Selling Business to Business Instead of B2C

9 replies
I've had enough of selling to customers and enough of information marketing.

I get the feeling I'd be better off learning programming and selling a service to businesses.

I know there are people making millions doing B2C, and people making millions doing B2B, but I just get the feeling the REAL big bucks are in B2B.

I've made some big B2B purchases myself for $200-$400, just within the last MONTH. I didn't think twice about it, I just made the payments for a service that will make me back the money I spent. I have no regrets, and no need to explain my purchase to ANYONE.

Yet I'd be hard-pressed to sell an ebook, audio series and video series for anything more than $100. Even $100 is pushing it. People expect MIRACLES at that price! Heck, people expect miracles at $37.

In general, consumers at home are careful about their spending - especially about digital information products. Businesses on the other hand, spend like CRAZY, as long as they get an ROI on their investment.

What are your thoughts and experiences with this?

Have you changed from B2C to B2B?
#b2c #business #selling #start
  • Profile picture of the author criniit
    I disagree with you on being able to sell info products to consumers for over $100. My average info product (B2C) in the IM/MMO niche is $397, with several in the $1,000-$2,000 range.

    If your not able to sell your products for that your either:

    A) Not properly establishing the value

    or

    B) Have crappy info products

    But yes the average product value for B2B will most of the time be higher, however it is a lot harder sell than B2C.

    I have been involved in both type of businesses.
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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    If you find it hard to charge high prices in this market then:

    1) You are targeting the wrong people...

    and/or

    2) You have not presented enough value.

    People will always buy if they feel the value they are going to receive is worth more to them than the money they are going to spend. It's up to you to make them realize that and understand the value they can get from your product or service.

    Sales is the same across the board. If you struggle to sell to consumers in this market you'll struggle just as hard to sell to businesses.
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  • Profile picture of the author sasuke120
    B2b is usually better regarding the profit span of your products
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    • Profile picture of the author Snow_Predator
      Originally Posted by criniit View Post

      I disagree with you on being able to sell info products to consumers for over $100. My average info product (B2C) in the IM/MMO niche is $397, with several in the $1,000-$2,000 range.

      If your not able to sell your products for that your either:

      A) Not properly establishing the value

      or

      B) Have crappy info products

      But yes the average product value for B2B will most of the time be higher, however it is a lot harder sell than B2C.

      I have been involved in both type of businesses.
      Yeh, sure, we know all about high ticket products in the MMO niche. I'm in the fitness niche, and it seems everything you could ever want to know about fitness is already available for free on the internet, so you have to really work hard to put together a product that people would be willing to pay for.

      Some of the best and most highly rated fitness guides around are selling for less than 10 bucks on Amazon, so who am I to come along and charge $1,000?

      Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't selling to the MMO crowd more or less B2B? Since your customers supposedly have their own businesses.

      I can see myself selling MMO information products, teaching people how I got to the stage I'm at now, but I can't help but think that I could make more money if I learned some programming and set up a service that people can use like Aweber.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Snow_Predator View Post

        Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't selling to the MMO crowd more or less B2B? Since your customers supposedly have their own businesses.
        In terms of potential customer numbers, I think the key word there may be "supposedly". Most MMO products promoted online are really targeted at consumers, arguably, rather than at real businesses.

        In terms of the amounts of money involved, I'm sure you're quite right, and that your observations above are entirely valid.

        I suspect that in some ways, it's the problems peculiar to being a vendor (rather than an affiliate) of lower-priced products that underlie your dissatisfaction and desire for change? From the affiliate perspective, the huge number of potential customers feels a big plus (not that I promote any MMO products, myself ). If I were a vendor rather than affiliate, I expect I'd share your perspective, instead.


        .
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  • Profile picture of the author Bleupage
    As mentioned in another post of yours..we did briefly do information products but then found that selling software was a lot more lucrative and had a higher perceived value. Specifically software as a service (SaaS)

    Having good outsourcing skills and a project mgr. have been a godsend for our businesses. I would suggest finding holes in the marketplace of any niche you are interested in and see what is lacking.

    Also doing surveys to your list or to Facebook is a good way to get feedback. As well as seeing what types of services are currently in the marketplace. Make a list of what they do well and what could be improved.

    Usually you can find improvement in almost any service. I think the important thing is to make sure you add your own flair and flavor to the service..make it yours..don't simply copy someone else. In the end you'll have a lot more success.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jack Gordon
    I have had much more success selling B2B than B2C. It is my niche, so to speak.

    All of the reasons listed above are valid. Businesses have money to spend, they have needs to be met, they have an interest in tools that could increase their efficiency.

    You could say the same, by the way, for consumers.

    But... and this is tough to quantify... selling to businesses is just easier. Business owners are more rational. More accustomed to paying larger amounts for solutions.

    Of course, the big tradeoff is that there are far fewer businesses out there than consumers. So whatever you sell will have to earn a larger portion of the market than it would as a consumer product.

    But, that is very doable. All of the rules apply. Find a hungry market. Make them a good meal. Price it right and sell a lot of them. Rinse, repeat.
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  • Profile picture of the author jgant
    I'm in both types of niches and like both. Very different models. I'm an affiliate in both. I spend far more time on my b2c niche, but then it's more profitable.

    If you're prepared to develop killer software and/or offer services you can make a killing in b2b. I'm not prepared to do either... but I earn the lion's share in b2b promoting software, which is a fairly easy sell if you show how it can earn a business more money.

    I agree, the MMO niche is b2b, hence expensive products can sell well.
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  • Profile picture of the author MNord
    Originally Posted by Snow_Predator View Post


    I've made some big B2B purchases myself for $200-$400, just within the last MONTH. I didn't think twice about it, I just made the payments for a service that will make me back the money I spent. I have no regrets, and no need to explain my purchase to ANYONE.
    Pretty much my whole career has been marketing and selling B2B. I think for people used to focusing on B2C, switching to B2B can be an eye opener. (And I agree with Alexa that a lot of MMO is aimed essentially at consumers.)

    The numbers can be vastly different. While $200-400 can be a big purchase for Jane Q. Public, or for someone doing IM/MMO in their spare time, that is a tiny fraction of a fraction of a rounding error for many businesses.

    For example: At my day job, if there is a webinar that costs $200 I just sign up if it looks good. It is more expensive for me to think about it for too long, research it, look for reviews etc. than it is to just hit "buy." I'd only spend a lot of time thinking about it if the price was upwards of maybe $500 - $750. At really large companies, the threshold might be much higher. The numbers can be staggering if you're not accustomed to seeing them.

    If you plan to sell to established businesses (depending on size), I think there is a real sweet spot for information products and services priced under $500. There's a lot of money to be made if you promote the right product and do it in a way that resonates with the business buyer.
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