14 replies
Hey!

I'm really interested in getting back into the Amazon Product Marketing game. I know the game as you so have it has changed a lot since last year. I used to know what I was doing with it, but right now I feel pretty lost. Where is a good & current place to get relevant information on how to market Amazon products?

Thanks!
#affiliates #amazon
  • Profile picture of the author dana67
    I think it's more about finding a niche and marketing your site or blog. Get traffic to that site/blog and place Amazon ads within that site/blog that go along with your content.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jaysmyne
      Originally Posted by dana67 View Post

      I think it's more about finding a niche and marketing your site or blog. Get traffic to that site/blog and place Amazon ads within that site/blog that go along with your content.
      That doesn't always work because the traffic is sometimes not targeted enough. If you have a general lifestyle blog like the one in my signature, then simply placing adverts for amazon is well - out of place and irrelevant to the users interest.

      One thing I was thinking of doing was picking a niche (or two) that has plenty of amazon products under it, be it jewelry, music, movies, electronics or something else. and then writing reviews for these products and placing them on my site in a separate sub section. So under the music section I might review an album by a popular artist.

      I'm not sure if making a sub store like section is the best way to go or if it would be better to create a whole new website specifically for amazon marketing. So, I'm teetertottering between ideas.

      Originally Posted by Jrivera680 View Post

      Internet Marketing Product Reviews & Ratings

      or
      You can use the search bar and type in the phrase that you like.
      I'm not looking to buy anything specific for this. I learned long ago that WSO or IM Products are typically a bunch of hype and not worth their random prices.

      I am looking for other warriors to share some of the more updated information in regards to amazon affiliate marketing and hoping that people who have done this in regards to amazon might chime in.

      I did use the search function but did not find what I was looking for, so I thought I'd start a discussion on it...perhaps it could benefit other members who were wondering about amazon marketing too.

      If it helps here are some specific questions I've been wondering:

      Has picking out the product in terms of Keywords and Google changed much? What kind of statistics should I be looking for to make sure the product is not so competitive? Do you know any specific online resources that go over this?

      When writing the review what length has typically been successful for others? Does it need to be 350 Words? 500? 750? 1,000? Or More? Is longer always better for this sort of thing? Or does that typically bore the reader?

      When doing this perhaps tacking on a "store-like" section to my existing lifestyle blog might be a good idea? Or is that against TOS for Amazon?

      Finally, what traffic methods work best? Should I go for organic or has others had success with paid traffic advertising through Adwords? Again, what TOS things should I look out for?

      Thanks for the help you all. Stay beautiful.
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      Xoxo, Danielle Faith
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        I am looking for other warriors to share some of the more updated information in regards to amazon affiliate marketing and hoping that people who have done this in regards to amazon might chime in.
        I think this thread might help a lot, Danielle (I know that it's helped a lot of others here): http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6608638

        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        Has picking out the product in terms of Keywords and Google changed much?
        I don't think so: I think that's still about as poor and unreliable an approach as it ever was.

        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        What kind of statistics should I be looking for to make sure the product is not so competitive?
        It would never occur to me to try to do this at all, for Amazon products: how competitive it is doesn't impact at all on whether it will convert my targeted traffic.

        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        When writing the review what length has typically been successful for others? Does it need to be 350 Words? 500? 750? 1,000? Or More? Is longer always better for this sort of thing? Or does that typically bore the reader?
        I don't write "reviews", myself. I think "Amazon review sites" and "search-engine traffic" are kind of from an earlier decade, really? Call me a skepchick, but the people I see still advising that appear to me probably to be making their income by selling "information" to aspiring marketers, rather than actually making it from Amazon.

        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        Finally, what traffic methods work best?
        This thread will doubtless help, with that one: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post8659398

        .
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Rather than chasing after niches, I have always searched within broad networks or groups of people such as within associations, professions and specific demographics. This can span hundreds of highly profitable niches, and marketing to them is a matter of matching relevant products to an engaging funnel system. It has nothing to do with ranking, SEO, Google, product competition, etc.

          Focusing on marketing by developing an affinity within specific groups of people who share a commonality of interests can open up a broad spectrum of lucrative niches and opportunities for referrals and cross-sales. Typically, people with common interests, vocation, members of organizations, clubs, etc tend to have similar and often predictable buying patterns. For me, this single marketing method has worked astoundingly well for over 16 years.

          For example, I targeted medical professionals, legal specialists, accountants, mechanical/electrical/aerospace engineers, managers in business/industry, academia faculty/researchers, trade associations, churches, civic groups, etc. People are multi-dimensional, and have a wide variety of interests which can often be monetized with effective online/offline list segmentation.

          The idea idea behind this marketing concept comes from the "affinity approach" used for many decades among marketers, also known as "market basket analysis". Purchase behavior was analyzed for cross-promotions and capturing new buyers who share similar demographics. In more recent years, it has evolved into "data mining" - using advanced statistical analysis.

          A superb example of data mining and market-basket analysis is Amazon's ingenious algorithm for suggesting "other" products, which has no readily apparent similarity to the original search or purchase. This is a common experience for Amazon affiliates, where the cross-over purchase is made in addition to (or sometimes instead of) the original product being promoted. Amazon keeps a history of purchases made (and even interests from search results) which is used in their data-based marketing algorithm and rigorous email promotions.

          Follow Amazon's example, which over the years has been finely tuned to become a very formidable marketing machine. Build lists of your initial buyers and their interests, then you can promote (ie recommend) progressively higher end products on the strength of your affinity and relationships with your subscribers.

          Consider that as much as 65% of Amazon's sales are from their own in-house promotions to existing customers (which are so generously given away by unknowing affiliates). Most affiliates are leaving huge piles of money on the table by not collecting contact information for repeat sales.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnnyPlan
        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        I'm not sure if making a sub store like section is the best way to go or if it would be better to create a whole new website specifically for amazon marketing.

        When doing this perhaps tacking on a "store-like" section to my existing lifestyle blog might be a good idea? Or is that against TOS for Amazon?
        There must be some things your audience at the lifestyle blog would be interested in. What are some of the article topics you regularly cover? There must be products that are related or similar on Amazon. As for making a separate tab for products, that could work. Just keep your product reviews unbiased and to the point. Don't make them like the product descriptions on Amazon though. If you are just putting the facts about the product, that gets boring. Take the time to try out the products you are reviewing or at least read the reviews so you can get an insight into what real users thought of those products.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jrivera680
    Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

    Hey!

    I'm really interested in getting back into the Amazon Product Marketing game. I know the game as you so have it has changed a lot since last year. I used to know what I was doing with it, but right now I feel pretty lost. Where is a good & current place to get relevant information on how to market Amazon products?

    Thanks!
    Internet Marketing Product Reviews & Ratings

    or
    You can use the search bar and type in the phrase that you like.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9404741].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Anurag96
    If you would write unbiased reviews about any Amazon product you will surely be able to sell it. And get a commission for that. Well, that's what affiliate marketing is.
    One more thing you can do is to have the products related to your niche in the sidebar. This works too.
    Cheers!
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    • Profile picture of the author Jaysmyne
      Originally Posted by Anurag96 View Post

      If you would write unbiased reviews about any Amazon product you will surely be able to sell it. And get a commission for that. Well, that's what affiliate marketing is.
      One more thing you can do is to have the products related to your niche in the sidebar. This works too.
      Cheers!
      Could you elaborate a little bit? How one might go about writing an unbiased review? Length, structure, etc.? Also, how does product placement in the sidebar work for you? Have you personally had an success with Amazon? What sort of things work for you and what sort of things do not? Do you do any outside link building/work to get your review seen or do you just pick topics in niches that have such low competition and high enough search that you get seen without really doing much other than posting the review? If so what are the statistics or "rules" you go by to determine what qualifies as a low competition niche with high search volume?
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      Xoxo, Danielle Faith
      Xo, Faith and DanielleFaith.me
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  • Profile picture of the author Chri5123
    Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

    Hey!

    I'm really interested in getting back into the Amazon Product Marketing game. I know the game as you so have it has changed a lot since last year. I used to know what I was doing with it, but right now I feel pretty lost. Where is a good & current place to get relevant information on how to market Amazon products?

    Thanks!
    Hi,

    Start with your interests to make it a bit easier. In regards to the process, at least for me, nothing much has changed from last year.

    You just need a RED HOT product, meaning loads of searches, awesome content and well structured site.

    A lot of the Amazon sites i build test niches quite quickly and then i build on my winners.

    Once you hit a decent niche and start getting some sales, then you want to go all out with building the site up,

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author SEO Power
    The Warrior Forum is ideal for obtaining the kind of information you seek. Some tips to help you:

    - You need a good grasp of keyword research techniques to market Amazon products.
    - Some SEO will be required to get traffic to your site.
    - Product reviews convert well in physical product niches.
    - Use noticeable call to action links and images within your content.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by SEO Power View Post

      - You need a good grasp of keyword research techniques to market Amazon products.
      I don't agree with this at all.

      Originally Posted by SEO Power View Post

      - Some SEO will be required to get traffic to your site.
      I don't agree with that, either.

      SEO isn't required to get traffic: it's only required to get search-engine traffic.

      I understand that when you're selling SEO services, you might like people here to imagine that "traffic" and "search-engine traffic" are about the same thing, but in reality they're hugely different plates of kwarezimal altogether.

      If Google de-indexed all my websites tomorrow, I think my traffic would perhaps drop by about 20%, but my income would drop only by about 3%, if that, because search-engine traffic is no good for this purpose anyway.

      I always suggest to people that they shouldn't put time and effort into trying to attract SEO traffic, for two main reasons: first, it's very precarious and makes your business Google-dependent, and any business that's Google-dependent is no more than one algorithm-change away from a potential accident (or even a potential disaster), as so many Warriors have been finding out over the last year or two, some of them to their very great cost; secondly, for me, search engine traffic, in every single one of my niches, has been uniformly the worst-converting traffic out of everything I've ever tried - search engine visitors to all my websites typically stay the least time, view the fewest pages, opt in the least often and actually buy anything by far the least often. For the sake of honest disclosure, I must admit that I do actually get tons of search engine traffic to all my main sites (because high rankings for multiple keywords happen to be a minor side-benefit of the main targeted traffic-generation method I use) but I'd certainly hate to have to make a living just from that traffic. If you have a good look round the forum, you'll also see plenty of other Warriors making exactly this point.

      .
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      • Profile picture of the author kilgore
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        I always suggest to people that they shouldn't put time and effort into trying to attract SEO traffic, for two main reasons: first, it's very precarious and makes your business Google-dependent, and any business that's Google-dependent is no more than one algorithm-change away from a potential accident (or even a potential disaster), as so many Warriors have been finding out over the last year or two, some of them to their very great cost; secondly, for me, search engine traffic, in every single one of my niches, has been uniformly the worst-converting traffic out of everything I've ever tried - search engine visitors to all my websites typically stay the least time, view the fewest pages, opt in the least often and actually buy anything by far the least often. For the sake of honest disclosure, I must admit that I do actually get tons of search engine traffic to all my main sites (because high rankings for multiple keywords happen to be a minor side-benefit of the main targeted traffic-generation method I use) but I'd certainly hate to have to make a living just from that traffic. If you have a good look round the forum, you'll also see plenty of other Warriors making exactly this point.
        I definitely agree with this. Well, mostly. I wouldn't want to depend on search engines, but I wouldn't want to ignore them either. In my case I get about 10% of my traffic from search engines and about 20% of my sales. That said, I wouldn't want to overly depend on any traffic source. Facebook changes its EdgeRank algorithms. Gmail creates special folders for newsletters that users don't notice. But your point is well taken. Rather than wasting time trying to game search engines, it's far better just to build a better site -- a site that people like and link to. Which by the way is a huge factor in search engine ranking too.


        Originally Posted by Jaysmyne View Post

        Hey!

        I'm really interested in getting back into the Amazon Product Marketing game. I know the game as you so have it has changed a lot since last year. I used to know what I was doing with it, but right now I feel pretty lost. Where is a good & current place to get relevant information on how to market Amazon products?

        Thanks!
        As for the OP, maybe it's just me, but it seems to me you're working backwards. You're starting off with a monetization strategy, but don't yet have anything to monetize. Wouldn't it be more fruitful to think of a need that you'd be in a good position to fill and then think about whether Amazon (or any other way to make money) is a good fit for that? I suppose it's possible to do it the way you describe, but speaking personally, I'd have a hard time making that work.
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by kilgore View Post

          Rather than wasting time trying to game search engines, it's far better just to build a better site -- a site that people like and link to. Which by the way is a huge factor in search engine ranking too.
          Very good point, here. Designing/producing things for humans rather than for search engines tends also to produce better SEO results than trying to design/produce things for Google. SEO is increasingly about quality and relevance, these days (like most other things in internet marketing, really).

          .
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