Amazon Review - 3,000+ words?

17 replies
Hi everyone,

Following on from my last thread: I've taken the plunge and sunk just under $500 dollars into buying my first high-value Amazon product. I'm convinced of the need to provide quality Amazon reviews, so I've bought the item to provide a genuinely stellar, value-heavy write-up.

I've used the product for a good few days and have started to write the review (which focuses on negatives as much as positives, although I think the product is still a good buy). There's just so much to say, and that fits in well with my desire to create really detailed reviews...but what's the right approach with pagination? I'd expect the review to easily top 3,000 words at the current rate. Should I split it up into different pages?

I plan to rely on search engine traffic at least for a short while, so would I see dramatically better results by splitting the review into multiple inter-linked pages? I find this really annoying as a user, and I can't guarantee that the reader will actually find the 'Next page' button if I set it up this way. But perhaps I shouldn't trust my own preferences when it comes to running this business... Especially if the SEO value would be dramatically increased by going with a page-split model. Major professional review sites seem to be about 50/50 on how they approach this issue.

Any thoughts? Thanks!
#amazon #review #words
  • Profile picture of the author myob
    You may not get an acceptable conversion rate (ie sales) at that price point using just a product "review" format, especially from an SEO-driven marketing model.

    More than likely, the traffic you do manage to send to Amazon will result in lower-end commissionable sales, if anything. Consider offering your 3000+ word article as a pdf document for download to qualified prospects.

    For more effective methods of driving traffic specific to Amazon and consistently providing a positive reader experience, this thread may be helpful: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...000-month.html
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    Any thoughts?
    "Myob" has beaten me to it, just above.

    (I agree with every word.)

    .
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  • Profile picture of the author jgant
    You're smart to buy the product. I've done that for sites buying many products for testing and personal use.

    If you publish the entire review online, consider tabbed content. Check out TopTenReviews.com. They publish tabbed content reviews.

    If you publish it straight up online, make a video too.

    With such valuable content perhaps you can come up with a way to get get people to sign up to you email newsletter for information.
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  • Thanks for the replies.

    I've read that thread before but I left with more questions than answers, in honesty. I'll take another look and see if it's clearer now - and if not, I'll post the queries here.

    I'd always expected to go 'off SEO' ASAP, but my prior focus had been on establishing a forum or using conventional offline advertising. I'm initially reluctant to use a list-based model because I hate being on lists myself and would/have never buy/bought from one, even if the list content was/is the polar opposite of 'spammy.' I even ignore informational articles that are passed through them (including from authority sites), and this has always seemed like the natural response. I might be attracted to a sale/coupon from an online shop that I've used in the past, but that's my limit. I guess it's just a case of my personal preferences not matching up with real-world buying patterns.

    Thanks again.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

      I'd always expected to go 'off SEO' ASAP, but my prior focus had been on establishing a forum or using conventional offline advertising.
      I know nothing about offline advertising, but running a forum can certainly produce some very good marketing results (I have one, in one of my affiliate niches). I treat it as "list-based", though ... just a "membership list" rather than a "subscriber-list" per se.

      Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

      I hate being on lists myself
      So do I, because such a high proportion of marketers' lists seem to be so poorly managed. You can do better, and do different things.

      Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

      and would/have never buy/bought from one, even if the list content was/is the polar opposite of 'spammy.'
      I regularly get spontaneous emails from subscribers, in many niches, telling me they've always thought and said that, but have surprised themselves by buying on my recommendations because "mine seem so different".

      Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

      I even ignore informational articles that are passed through them (including from authority sites), and this has always seemed like the natural response.
      Well, that's my cue to say "You are not your customer", and there are huge numbers of people who don't feel quite that way.

      You've bought an expensive product, and written a 3,000-word review of it, so you're obviously taking the thing seriously and are not averse to producing "content", anyway. A list model might actually suit you very well, in spite of your protestations!

      .
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

      I'm initially reluctant to use a list-based model because I hate being on lists myself and would/have never buy/bought from one,
      Amazon builds lists of their buyers (and even casual shoppers). You will be very generously leaving a lot of money on the table for Amazon (including perhaps sales of your $500 product) for their own very powerful marketing machine by directly sending them all your traffic and leads.
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  • Profile picture of the author jgant
    I'm not the world's best email marketer, but I build lists. Even while getting started, just promote your new posts to get more traffic to your site and continue engagement. I do this quite a bit and over time the traffic really builds up and the revenue from display ads alone is well worth the minimal effort.

    As I continue in the niche, I can try different offers and different types of content.
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  • Profile picture of the author fatchap
    When I want to buy something I am not going to read a 3000 word review. What exactly are you selling? Cars are sold on the basis of a 30 second advert, or nice pic in a magazine. That gets the prospect into the showroom.

    Surely the aim is to get your traffic to click through to amazon and let them do the selling. Why would they join your list when they could go straight to amazon?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by fatchap View Post

      When I want to buy something I am not going to read a 3000 word review.
      Maybe not if you already know exactly what you want to buy, no. Most people don't, though, especially when we're talking (as in this thread) about a $500 product.

      Originally Posted by fatchap View Post

      Surely the aim is to get your traffic to click through to amazon and let them do the selling. Why would they join your list when they could go straight to amazon?
      Sounds like you're not very familiar with how affiliate marketing works, perhaps?
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      • Profile picture of the author fatchap
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        Maybe not if you already know exactly what you want to buy, no. Most people don't, though, especially when we're talking (as in this thread) about a $500 product.



        Sounds like you're not very familiar with how affiliate marketing works, perhaps?
        Funnily enough I am very familiar with it It's how I make money. I stick things in front of eyes and get them to amazon as fast as possible so amazon can sell them - they are experts at this I think. If not how do they turn over billions a year?

        Cars cost $25000 and are advertised as I said. Are you seriously suggesting that someone will visit an affiliate site and plough through 3000 words rather than use amazon for information like this?

        e.g. cameras - high end cameras have loads of info on the amazon sales page. Why try to beat that. Also when comparing different models of say ovens - they all get hot and cook food - what's to know? Cameras - point and click - picture took. Change to video - click - video taken. Minor differences in zoom, image and video resolution but basically they are all the same. So it comes down to looks and price.

        However I am a strong believer in people doing what they feel happy with. If writing 3000 words per item pleases you then good luck to you - I hope you make money
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by fatchap View Post

          I stick things in front of eyes and get them to amazon as fast as possible so amazon can sell them - they are experts at this I think. If not how do they turn over billions a year?

          Cars cost $25000 and are advertised as I said. Are you seriously suggesting that someone will visit an affiliate site and plough through 3000 words rather than use amazon for information like this?
          You are right - they are marketing experts. But up to 60% of those billions are from non-affiliate marketing; in-house promotions and their own email marketing campaigns.

          It does seem you are missing an essential marketing concept here. It is never a good idea to send prospects (especially for high end products) directly to Amazon without first building rapport and establishing a buying readiness.

          Even with "targeted" traffic, the decision process for making a purchase is almost always longer than Amazon's 24-hour cookie. That's why most affiliates lose out 98% or more on sales commissions. (A 2% conversion rate is considered good. LOL!)

          Seriously, longer articles can actually be quite effective for engaging and retaining qualified buyers' attention for intermediary calls-to-action such as an incentivized funnel system. Obtaining contact information for followup marketing is considered best practices by top marketers (including Amazon) for maximizing conversions.
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          • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
            Are you seriously suggesting that someone will visit an affiliate site and plough through 3000 words rather than use amazon for information like this?
            That is how I personally buy expensive products. Finding a 3000 word review based on personal experience is a dream come true. It will provide insights not remotely found on Amazon, which mostly lists features.

            If you relied on Amazon features every product would be great, but that is obviously not true.

            I expect that page will rank highly in Google, even #1, without worrying about SEO.


            e.g. cameras - high end cameras have loads of info on the amazon sales page. Why try to beat that. Also when comparing different models of say ovens - they all get hot and cook food - what's to know? Cameras - point and click - picture took. Change to video - click - video taken. Minor differences in zoom, image and video resolution but basically they are all the same. So it comes down to looks and price.
            That must be your experience. It's a little embarrassing, actually, to think all ovens are the same. Unquestionably, you have never been to a high-end oven store. It's mind bending once you know what is actually available and what you can get based on your budget.

            But pfft. What's to know? It gets hot and cooks your food. So does a fireplace. A few sticks and a match and who needs to bother with an oven?


            Same with cameras. Again, embarrassing to say all cameras are the same. Maybe you should spend time in a camera forum among professionals to get a different perspective.


            Cars. What's to know? They have four wheels and get you from A to B. Maybe I'm the only one who has never bought a car based on a 30 second ad. Isn't that what everyone does? See an ad on TV for a Mercedes and pick up the phone for the local Mecedes dealer and ask for the latest model to be delivered.

            When you think about it, why do we even have different models of cars, different cameras, different ovens, etc. They're all the same.

            Actually, why do we even have different stores? What does Nordstrom offer than WalMart doesn't? Both have shoes. They're all the same. Why do we need Nordstrom or WalMart? We can just rely on the brief product descriptions at Amazon. For that matter, Google might as well de-index a billion product pages and blogs because no one needs them anymore.

            All we need is the Amazon product page.

            Of course, ironically, that would wipe out your thin affiliate page which doesn't serve any purpose except to link to Amazon.

            .
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  • Profile picture of the author tomako
    Write the review man and take lots of pictures, don't listen to people that amazon is not worth it, I am making +$2500 every month from amazon and half of it from high-end ($800-$4000) product reviews.

    What is great with sending people that is interested in high end products is they always buy something, like smartphone or a big screen tv and you get commissions of them too.
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  • Profile picture of the author BlackKryponite
    good luck on it theres money to be made on amazon
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  • Profile picture of the author miklanderson2
    When I'm making a large purchase and am planning on spending a good bit of money, I seek out the longer articles that actually have some research behind them. Anyone can spend a half hour writing a 300 word review of a product and throw it on their website. The longer articles that dig into the fine details of what the product can and can't do are the only ones I read.

    If you're letting Amazon do the selling, you're leaving a lot of money on the table.

    I was recently in the market for a large LED TV and was frustrated by how little information Amazon actually had on the TVs I was interested in. See for yourself...

    Samsung UN75H6350 75-Inch 1080p 120Hz Smart LED...Samsung UN75H6350 75-Inch 1080p 120Hz Smart LED...

    Tell me Amazon is doing a great job of marketing this. There isn't much there other than a list of the features and if you're sending people directly to the sales page on Amazon after they read a short review on your site, you're going to lose business.
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    • Profile picture of the author richmann
      Since you are writing such a lengthy article I would suggest you make it a little longer, then convert it into PDF. You can also make a video and offer both to build list.
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  • Profile picture of the author SEOZONE3
    Hi,
    I've sent you a PM with all details, please check that carefully & reply me.
    I'll wait for your reply.
    Thanks in advance
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