Article Syndication Queries

21 replies
Hello everyone,

I'm travelling a strange and somewhat-stilted affiliate path at present, but I hope that I'm moving in the right direction. I started out drafting long (3,000+ word) Amazon product reviews but have been advised to consider email marketing/article syndication. I'm a fan of heavily researched, high-value content, so I'm keen to commit to this route.

I've read as much as possible here on the forum but a few questions remain:


i. There seems to be a tendency to promote only one or two (often ClickBank) products using this method, at least to start out. Are these products simply cycled through the auto-responder until a purchase is made, i.e. 2-3 emails and then a recommendation for the product? This method seems to have a few disadvantages:
  • What if the reader simply has no interest in the specific product(s)? Selling can surely only ever go so far. I could be pushing a product for several weeks when a particular reader decided not to buy in the first week (for whatever reason). But that same reader may well be willing to buy another related item.
  • Continuity has been mentioned as a major issue. Do all of the articles therefore need to lead towards the same end-product(s)? Does this not become limiting after a period? Let's say that I sell a product on 'Caring for oak trees'. My target audience could be interested in all kinds of gardening supplies, but I'd be tied into writing articles about oak trees for a certain time, and this could become a real challenge after 2-3 months.
Perhaps it's a case of running a particular product for just a few weeks before moving onto an alternative?

I'm considering an alternative plan that relies on a magazine style, i.e. a different topic with each email and a different (physical) product to match. There could be downsides to this option (e.g. only exposing the reader to each recommendation on a single occasion), but there could be an increase in open rates if the content's diversity makes it more engaging. Are there any thoughts on this method?


ii. I've seen a recommendation to include full/half articles in each email. This sounds like a good idea in itself, but I've also seen recommendations to 'train' readers to click through to your website. How do these ideas tie together? If an entire article is reproduced in the email, what is the reader clicking through to?

An alternative method might involve writing a short introduction to each article. This introduction would be included in the auto-responder, prompting a click-through to the website. This plan would also satisfy the idea that readers should be taken out of their inboxes ASAP; there's a lot of competing material there etc. Any thoughts on this?


iii. Product reviews seem to be an excellent way of selling, but I'm keen to explore alternatives. What are members' thoughts on leaving the 'recommendation' part altogether and simply including in-text links (although not in the articles that are used for syndication)? By this I mean writing an article on 'Caring for your oak tree', including a paragraph on pruning high branches, and making the phrase 'use a ladder' a link to a ladder purchase site.


I realise that this is a long post, and I don't expect answers to all of the questions! A lot of the work will of course come down to trial and error. But there are a lot of experienced people here who have travelled my path in the past, and their input would be greatly appreciated. I've done my best to ask only those questions that I really can't find answers to elsewhere.

I'll be sure to post a day-by-day results journal once I begin if anyone's interested.

Thank you!
#article #queries #syndication
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    There seems to be a tendency to promote only one or two (often ClickBank) products using this method, at least to start out.
    Hmm ... does there? Maybe. I didn't know that. I use article syndication to promote everything I promote, and always have done. What you say could easily be true, though.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    Are these products simply cycled through the auto-responder until a purchase is made, i.e. 2-3 emails and then a recommendation for the product?
    I imagine different people do this in different ways.

    I'll tell you how I do it, if that helps ...

    I select my niches in accordance with my perception of there being (at least) a few suitable ClickBank products with suitable sales pages in the same niche, and apparently plenty of places to syndicate the articles to. Then I put up a small niche site with a prominently incentivized opt-in, and on the home page I always have one article which I don't syndicate anywhere else (so that all article marketing visitors to the site have at least one front-page article to read which they haven't read elsewhere), and obviously it isn't a squeeze page.

    I give them a "free report" (I don't call it that) for opting in. The report serves all these essential purposes.

    Then I send email on days 1, 3, 6, 10 and 15 and thereafter at 5-day intervals, with a promotion occupying (usually) the latter part of one email in three. I'll typically promote each product twice (sometimes three times) before moving on to another. My subscribers know and understand that I'll sometimes promote something they've already bought, and they know and understand why, because I tell them in quite some detail how affiliate marketing works (this gives me the opportunity to provide reassurance that they'll never pay more for anything by buying it through my link - which they won't know if I don't tell them, and that can cost a lot of sales). The more I tell them about how affiliate marketing works and why I'm doing it, the more I sell: that's easy to understand. (And of course it keeps me nice and legally compliant, too).

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    What if the reader simply has no interest in the product(s)?
    Then they won't buy it. (They'll still have plenty of other stuff to read, from my emails, and maybe they'll change their mind in future? Or maybe not ...).

    (Why is that a "disadvantage"? I don't expect 100% of my subscribers to buy something).

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    Do all of the articles therefore need to lead towards the same end-product(s)?
    None of my articles ever leads toward any product, really.

    I've never mentioned a product in an article, and have no plans to (nobody would publish them).

    I don't quite understand what you're asking here, and what information you're looking for - sorry.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    I'm considering an alternative plan that relies on a magazine style, i.e. a different topic with each email and a different (physical) product to match.
    Sorry, I have absolutely no experience of that at all, and don't understand what it has to do with "article syndication"? Article syndication is a targeted traffic-generation method.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    I've seen a recommendation to include full/half articles in each email.
    I do something slightly similar. Each new article I write (though I write only 2 per month, per niche, 3 at the most) gives me enough content to add 2 more emails on to the series (with a little bit of re-writing, always, to incorporate the continuity-process at the start and end of each mail.)

    My perspective of email marketing is that the primary purpose of each email in the automated series is no more and no less than to ensure that people who read it open the next email. I find that if you can attend to that successfully, the money follows.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    I've also seen recommendations to 'train' readers to click through to your website.
    I do this, also.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    How do these ideas tie together?
    Well, I find.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    If an entire article is reproduced in the email, what is the reader clicking through to?
    Some other content on the website. (I don't think I've ever reproduced an entire article in an email, though, to be honest).

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    An alternative method might involve writing a short introduction to each article. This introduction would be included in the auto-responder, prompting a click-through to the website.
    Yes, I've heard of people doing this, and at times done it to some extent in my email series.

    It's a bit inconvenient, though, when you're starting out, because it increases your requirement for "conveniently linkable website content" and (to me) one of the great advantages of article syndication + email marketing is that you don't need an impressive website.

    I don't think think "training people to click on your links" means necessarily doing it in every single email?

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    This plan would also satisfy the idea that readers should be taken out of their inboxes ASAP
    I suppose so ... (I've never really had that idea, though).

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    Product reviews seem to be an excellent way of selling
    Not a perspective I share at all, really; sorry.

    My heart always sinks a little when I see people posting here, asking for advice, and starting off with something like "I'm doing an Amazon review site and ..." because I very strongly suspect that almost none of them ever really becomes profitable, these days, and it's a real uphill struggle trying to offer them any advice (typically because they already "know" that "traffic comes from Google" ). Just my skepchick perspective; sorry.

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    What are members' thoughts on leaving the 'recommendation' part altogether
    When you say "leaving" do you mean "leaving out"? In which case, you could test it, and see, perhaps?

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    I mean writing an article on 'Caring for your oak tree', including a paragraph on pruning, and making 'use a ladder' a link to a ladder purchase site.
    Yes, you could try that, too (but not with Amazon, of course, since they don't allow affiliate links in emails).

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    I realise that this is a long post, and I don't expect answers to all of the questions!
    I think I may have been of very little, if any, help at all. I started off answering expecting from the title that they'd all be "article marketing questions" but hardly found any, to be honest (that's not a complaint! It's just why I might not have been very helpful ).

    Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

    I'll be sure to post a day-by-day results journal once I begin if anyone's interested.
    They will be. That would be cool. (Not in the Main Marketing Forum of course: WF blogs and/or the "Member Contests & Challenges" forum are the places for that. There are some good threads there in which people recount their successes with article syndication ).

    .
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    • Profile picture of the author thegreatpretender
      No Alexa, that was incredibly helpful. You've filled in a lot of the pieces of information that I was missing. Any gaps were solely the result of gaps in my original post!

      If I can clarify two points:


      i. When I refer to a 'magazine' style, I'm not referring to the website, but rather to the email series. If I'm promoting 'Caring for your oak tree' as my ClickBank eBook, one strategy could be a series of articles about oak trees that leads to a final email with a product recommendation. Another strategy could be a series of different articles like in a magazine, each with its own product. As examples: '10 things you never knew about oak trees' with a final paragraph promoting the 'Caring for your oak tree' eBook, and then the next email on 'Natural beech tree feeders' with a link to a site that sells a related feed. Readers would only be exposed to each product once, but I'd be presenting them with articles on a range of different topics. Do you have any experience with this style?


      ii. I understand about not mentioning products in the articles for syndication, but where are they included otherwise? Presumably in the (slightly rewritten) emails? So you might have a modified article as the body of an email, and then 'This looks like a good related product' as the final paragraph (or something to this effect)? Do you claim to have used the product(s) yourself? And how would you approach this for companies that forbid affiliate links in emails? I'm looking to move away from Amazon, but I wouldn't want to discount it entirely as a future sales-base.

      If you're including the recommendation in a final paragraph (or so), is it safe to say that you don't actually talk about the products very much? You just throw them out there and let people buy as they see fit? I'm struggling to see how a specific product can be pre-sold without mentioning the product very much (and in a review format). Some insight here would be greatly appreciated as it's the biggest missing link in my chain at present. I can split-test my first questions in this post (point i.), but not knowing how to present the products for sale is a more significant issue.


      Apologies for the misleading thread title. To clarify that: I'm looking at this all of this from an article syndication perspective, but the actual syndication aspects are relatively clear. I have lots of ideas re: approaching website owners, offline publications etc. I'm far less clear on the email marketing side of things (even after reading the forum postings).

      Thank you so much for your input!
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      • Profile picture of the author thegreatpretender
        One more question... You mention having a content-rich website, but that this website doesn't need to be huge as a result of the article syndication/email marketing model. I (think!) I've read elsewhere that you usually start sites with around four articles, three of which will be syndicated elsewhere. How does this give the impression of being 'content rich'? When readers click around, will they not soon realise that the site has only a very limited number of pages? Or is there a method for creating an impression of more content?

        I suppose that this becomes less of a problem over time as you add articles that are syndicated elsewhere... Each new article will offer an additional page for new visitors to access (or rather see that they could access) from the landing page...
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          From what I've read here, I think you may be confusing things a bit.

          The purpose of your syndicated article is not to pre-sell a product. The purpose is to pre-sell you, and to create a positive experience for the reader. A positive experience you give them an opportunity to continue by clicking the link to your site. That's it.

          So how do you do this?

          You focus on the reader and what they want to achieve.

          Let's look at your oak tree example for a moment.

          Do you really think people are interested in caring for oak trees? Or are they interested in adding value to their property? Creating shade to keep their house cooler? Having a beautiful display of foliage in the fall? Even creating an asset by selling the mature tree for lumber?

          Whatever it is, that's what you talk about in your syndicated articles. You show that you understand why they want what they want, and demonstrate that you have the ability to either give it to them or guide them to it. Then you oh so generously give them a link to follow to get more of you.

          Once they follow that link, you continue the positive experience by providing quality content related to the topic of interest (live, healthy, thriving oak trees in this instance) and offer them a way to continue getting even more from you, all in exchange for a simple email address.

          Your emails keep the party going, offering more of the why and what, and sometimes the how, including recommendations of resources to bring home the prize. Some of those resources will pay you a commission.

          You also asked about reviews. If you have direct experience with a product or service, by all means use it. If you don't, don't try to fake it. You can still demonstrate expertise by analyzing and summarizing multiple reviews from multiple sources. With many physical products, you can do well with multiple recommendations (good, better, best or beginner, intermediate, advanced, or even budget, mid-range, premium).

          One last thing. By focusing on the reader's desires rather than a specific product, you open up a whole range of possibilities, both for products to promote and places to lure prospects from (aka, syndication outlets).
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

          One more question... You mention having a content-rich website, but that this website doesn't need to be huge as a result of the article syndication/email marketing model. I (think!) I've read elsewhere that you usually start sites with around four articles, three of which will be syndicated elsewhere.
          Yes - all correct.

          (My websites "grow big" only because they gradually get all my new articles added. Nobody reads them there, though. They're accessible but not prominently displayed.)

          Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

          How does this give the impression of being 'content rich'?
          By comparison with a squeeze page!

          Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

          When readers click around, will they not soon realise that the site has only a very limited number of pages?
          If they really do, yes. But (hopefully) they'll quickly appreciate that there's "more of the same" available by email, as well as the "freebie".

          Most people don't look that much, before opting in.

          It's really "content-rich" in that it isn't a squeeze page. It looks like a "proper website". At least, the home page does. (The home page, admittedly, especially in the early stages, is technically "most of the site" ).

          Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

          I suppose that this becomes less of a problem over time as you add articles that are syndicated elsewhere... Each new article will offer an additional page for new visitors to access (or rather see that they could access) from the landing page...
          Yes, exactly so. "See that they could access". It's mostly "impression", really, I think. You shouldn't "show search engines one thing and visitors another", in general, they say, so it's not concealed, but if it's not prominent, most people don't look.

          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          The purpose of your syndicated article is not to pre-sell a product. The purpose is to pre-sell you, and to create a positive experience for the reader. A positive experience you give them an opportunity to continue by clicking the link to your site. That's it.
          This. Exactly this, of course. (I think TGP "gets" this, John? The other confusions were just from the way I've explained things elsewhere, I think ).

          .
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          • Profile picture of the author thegreatpretender
            Many thanks to you both for the information and reassurance. You've provided the glue that I need to stick together everything that I've read.

            I'm sure that I'll have many more questions as I go forwards, but right now it's time to close down the Warrior Forum and start the real work!
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            • Profile picture of the author Kevin McNally
              Some good tips here about email marketing but in recent years I haven't seen any evidence of article syndication working to a great extent, no doubt it can work at a higher level but I think it's one of the most difficult areas for new guys to master.

              Here is what I would do if I made serious money through article syndication.

              Pick a niche and do a WSO with step by step guidelines describing all the methods and resources used, track opt ins from articles syndicated and revenue stats.

              Not just theory, actual results.

              Honestly, if anyone done this with decent results they would have thousands of customers from this very forum.

              I have bought similar courses using PPC to build a list and they are much more helpful.
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              • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                Banned
                Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                I haven't seen any evidence of article syndication working to a great extent
                You haven't looked far. Here's some: http://www.warriorforum.com/member-c...ndication.html

                .
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                • Profile picture of the author Kevin McNally
                  Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                  You haven't looked far. Here's some: http://www.warriorforum.com/member-c...ndication.html

                  .
                  think that post actually supports my view unfortunately.
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                  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                    Banned
                    Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                    think that post actually supports my view unfortunately.
                    On some other planet, possibly; but certainly not on this one.

                    If you actually read it, instead of just wanting to "be right" about this, you'll quickly discover that that's the account of someone with very little experience setting out to make her first $1,500 through article syndication over a period of a few weeks, and actually made just under $4,000 in that time.

                    You're welcome to interpret that as somehow "supporting your view", if you really want to, but I hope you'll excuse the observation that I think you might be well advised not to expect too many other people to interpret those facts in that way.

                    .
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                    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                      Kevin, I think it's going to be a long wait for the WSO you described. I know I won't be the one to produce it, and here's why.

                      > First, there are the copycats. You don't see a lot of successful affiliates offering up their lists of successful products and niches, at least not in comparison to the number of people begging for them. Why? Because too many people are not interested in learning how to find their own way, they just want to copy what someone else has done.

                      If I laid out a list of my syndication partners, their sites, and the titles they've accepted along with specific results from each submission, I can tell you what would happen. I'd have no more partners and they'd be buried in crap.

                      > Even if the first concern wasn't there, article syndication is a blend of art and science, and it can be very personal. What works for me would likely cease working if it became too cut and paste, with everyone doing the same thing. That's why I don't provide a lot of exact examples or swipes here or in my book.

                      > Last, my results wouldn't be relevant even if I started with a new niche market. I've been doing this for years, and likely doing some things unconsciously. Which means there would be a high probability I left something out. And rather than figure it out for themselves, there are a lot of people who would give it a casual try and then cry scam when they aren't sipping umbrella drinks on the beach in a week.

                      Like my football coach told me almost four decades ago, the system works if you do. But you still have to make the plays.
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                      • Profile picture of the author Kevin McNally
                        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                        Kevin, I think it's going to be a long wait for the WSO you described. I know I won't be the one to produce it, and here's why.

                        > First, there are the copycats. You don't see a lot of successful affiliates offering up their lists of successful products and niches, at least not in comparison to the number of people begging for them. Why? Because too many people are not interested in learning how to find their own way, they just want to copy what someone else has done.

                        If I laid out a list of my syndication partners, their sites, and the titles they've accepted along with specific results from each submission, I can tell you what would happen. I'd have no more partners and they'd be buried in crap.

                        > Even if the first concern wasn't there, article syndication is a blend of art and science, and it can be very personal. What works for me would likely cease working if it became too cut and paste, with everyone doing the same thing. That's why I don't provide a lot of exact examples or swipes here or in my book.

                        > Last, my results wouldn't be relevant even if I started with a new niche market. I've been doing this for years, and likely doing some things unconsciously. Which means there would be a high probability I left something out. And rather than figure it out for themselves, there are a lot of people who would give it a casual try and then cry scam when they aren't sipping umbrella drinks on the beach in a week.

                        Like my football coach told me almost four decades ago, the system works if you do. But you still have to make the plays.
                        Very fair points John, I wouldn't reveal everything either.

                        However without evidence it still leads to the same conclusion that for most folks this method will not be a long term plan ( although many things internet based do have this flaw ). Indeed most people probably don't have the skills as a writer to be honest to really make it work to a decent level.

                        Can it work ? Of course it can. The main difference with this method is that even on a small scale there is very little social proof .

                        It's all about opinions of course, until you have a big list this method is very similar to a job as you need to keep churning out articles to get traffic etc.... Unless you have SEO strong rankings, PPC or social media traffic you are relying on your list or traffic from your articles.
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                        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                          Banned
                          Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                          until you have a big list this method is very similar to a job as you need to keep churning out articles to get traffic etc....
                          On the contrary, Kevin: this method is - if anything - rather less like a job than most forms of internet marketing: I still have articles out there which I wrote as long ago as 2009 which continue to bring me highly targeted traffic, subscribers and income every month, without anyone needing to use a search engine at all.

                          Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                          Unless you have SEO strong rankings, PPC or social media traffic you are relying on your list or traffic from your articles.
                          Of course you're relying on traffic from your articles: that's one of the strengths of the method: you're not dependent on Google; nor on paying for traffic. However, you don't need large numbers of articles: you just have to get them as widely published as possible.

                          .
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                          • Profile picture of the author Kevin McNally
                            Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                            On the contrary, Kevin: this method is - if anything - rather less like a job than most forms of internet marketing: I still have articles out there which I wrote as long ago as 2009 which continue to bring me highly targeted traffic, subscribers and income every month, without anyone needing to use a search engine at all.



                            Of course you're relying on traffic from your articles: that's one of the strengths of the method: you're not dependent on Google; nor on paying for traffic. However, you don't need large numbers of articles: you just have to get them as widely published as possible.

                            .
                            Interesting, some people would argue that being dependent on using highly targetted PPC is far more appealing than relying on writing new articles . Old articles from 2009 may still bring in some new leads but it's not going to be much to be fair.

                            I will bow out this thread now, if anyone has some case studies or evidence of this method working on a big scale feel free to PM me.

                            All the best
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                            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                              Banned
                              Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                              it's not going to be much to be fair.
                              You have no idea how much or little it's going to be, Kevin: you don't actually know the first thing about it, "to be fair".

                              Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                              I will bow out this thread now
                              Thanks.

                              I neither know nor care what your business model is, but whatever it is, you certainly won't find John McCabe and me butting into threads asking for advice on it, just to tell everyone repeatedly that we've never seen any evidence of it working.

                              Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                              if anyone has some case studies or evidence of this method working on a big scale feel free to PM me.
                              John's already taken the time and trouble to explain to you why that won't be happening.

                              You're just pretending not to understand or acknowledge what he's said, so that you can go out of the thread still implying that you've asked for something you have a reasonable expectation of getting, and not been given it, but the reality is that that's simply untrue.

                              You were immediately shown an example of exactly what you asked for.

                              When you said that it confirmed your view, you were then shown why that was completely wrong, too.

                              Even after that, when you asked why there wasn't a WSO or more information like that around, that was fully explained to you, too.

                              And even then, you tried to be more dismissive, again, with your "it's not going to be much" riposte (which was just plain ignorant). Sorry, but although people have tolerated all this nonsense from you many times before, in earlier discussions, in my opinion you've pretty unambiguously crossed the line into some really unprofessional behavior, this time, and as fellow-marketers and fellow-Warriors, we actually expect and deserve better than that from you.

                              .
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                            • Profile picture of the author myob
                              Originally Posted by Kevin McNally View Post

                              Some good tips here about email marketing but in recent years I haven't seen any evidence of article syndication working to a great extent, no doubt it can work at a higher level but I think it's one of the most difficult areas for new guys to master.

                              Here is what I would do if I made serious money through article syndication.

                              Pick a niche and do a WSO with step by step guidelines describing all the methods and resources used, track opt ins from articles syndicated and revenue stats.

                              Not just theory, actual results.

                              Honestly, if anyone done this with decent results they would have thousands of customers from this very forum.

                              I have bought similar courses using PPC to build a list and they are much more helpful.
                              LOL! Are you serious? The article syndication (ie info) marketing model has been around for at least a century and a half, and used by virtually all major corporations. There are trade publications for any business one can think of, with countless examples of articles driving inquiries and sales.

                              Being a simple kind of a guy, I see no need for a WSO on this very simple and proven marketing system. Fortunes have been made long before the internet, and continue to do so through article syndication marketing. Here is how I did it for more than 16 years:

                              1 - Create a content-rich niche website or a stand-alone high end product demo site (include videos with product in action).
                              2 - Setup your email auto-responder for daily emails to prospects.
                              3 - Write a syndication quality article (or get someone to write it for you)
                              4 - Generate a list of syndication partners (the Directory of Ezines and Writers' Market are excellent initial resources for this)
                              5 - Submit the article with a call to action to visit your website for more info and/or join your subscriber list.
                              6 - Rinse and repeat (with an 800-1200 word article about every 2-3 weeks per niche).

                              Contrary to popular misinformation, this has nothing to do with SEO or gaming the search engines. A good writer can break into virtually any niche, no matter how stiff the competition may be. In stark contrast to SEO, where one must search for "low competition" keywords/phrases to rank, the more competitive niches generally provide greater opportunities for article syndication publication.

                              Learning to write well with an engaging style is critical, but can be learned. I highly recommend "Elements of Style" by William Strunk, "Brand Against the Machine" by John Morgan, and perhaps "The AP Stylebook". Seriously, these are minimum core essentials that I demanded for all of my writers to grasp.
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                              • Profile picture of the author Kevin McNally
                                Against my better judgement I will make one last post on this thread.

                                Alexa, only person making personal comments in this thread is yourself. For all your thousands of posts regarding article syndication I have never seen any evidence that you make serious money doing this online , please note I don't judge anyone on this basis at all personally .

                                As I already said I have no doubt that this method can work for some writers.

                                Anyway, let's get back to working on our own stuff and use our time better.

                                All the best
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                              • Profile picture of the author Chris Worner
                                Originally Posted by myob View Post


                                Learning to write well with an engaging style is critical, but can be learned. I highly recommend "Elements of Style" by William Strunk, "Brand Against the Machine" by John Morgan, and perhaps "The AP Stylebook". Seriously, these are minimum core essentials that I demanded for all of my writers to grasp.
                                Cheers for the recommendations! Do you have anymore?

                                -Chris
                                Signature

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                                • Profile picture of the author myob
                                  Originally Posted by Chris Worner View Post

                                  Cheers for the recommendations! Do you have anymore?

                                  -Chris
                                  "Turn Words Into Traffic", by Jim and Dallas Edwards

                                  "How I Made $14,000 in 48hrs By Publishing One Article and How You Can Do It Too", by Carl Hruza.

                                  These are available on Amazon, and are quite closely aligned with the exact article syndication methodology I used for over 16 years to amass a fortune in affiliate sales.

                                  When composing an article for syndication, always consider not only what actionable results you want from readers, but also the standards expected by publishers. Good writing includes considerations not only of reader expectations such as article length, grammar, spelling, syntax, context, etc., but other similar and often more constraining standards expected by publishers.

                                  And now, more than ever before, publishers really are hungry for quality content. This marketing model of article syndication is a dynamic, asset-building process. It does take time to grow, but over time it can become a powerful traffic-generating tool with virtually unlimited scalability. For any given commercially viable niche, there may be hundreds or perhaps even hundreds of thousands of online/offline publication outlets suitable for syndication.

                                  Most editors listed in publication directories such as "Writers' Market" and DOE are quite used to a "query" format; an unsolicited proposal for an article. In addition, nearly all offline magazines and newspapers have article submission contact information. An excellent tutorial for querying editors is given in "Writers' Market", which also includes current contact information and article submission guidelines for magazines and newspapers. Generally, you can approach publishers who have a subscriber base aligned with your target market with a query similar to this sample: Sample Query Letter to Magazines.

                                  In a query, it's important to cite your experience in the niche and it would be quite helpful to also mention a few relevant articles (your portfolio link at EzineArticles.com is ideal for this purpose) that have been previously published. If you're not yet published, or even if you're just starting within a new niche, the best way to begin IMO is with ezines (read Alexa's posts and references in How to Find Article Syndication Partners?.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        When I refer to a 'magazine' style, I'm not referring to the website, but rather to the email series.
        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        Readers would only be exposed to each product once, but I'd be presenting them with articles on a range of different topics. Do you have any experience with this style?
        I see what you mean. No, not really. I can see that it might work if you have very high open/attention-rates. For my first 3 years, ClickBank was all I did, so in my niches started off during my first 3 years, which is most of them, my issue if anything was "relative shortage of products"! I've amended some of those, to some extent, now, but never tried anything like that mostly for that reasons. Once I get a niche "fully set up" and with a long, automated series which maintains high open-rates, I'm really reluctant to revisit it and start "fiddling" because I think, for myself, overall, that's time better spent "adding another new niche", really.

        Having said that, it's been over a year now since I did that, either, but that's been for personal, not for business reasons.

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        I understand about not mentioning products in the articles for syndication, but where are they included otherwise? Presumably in the (slightly rewritten) emails?
        Yes ... well, in about a third of them, anyway.

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        So you might have a rewritten article as the body of an email, and then 'This looks like a good related product' as the final paragraph (or something to this effect)?
        Yes; I've certainly sometimes done that (which seems to work fine).

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        How would you approach this for companies that forbid affiliate links in emails?
        You have to link to something on your site, then. (Which means putting additional things on your site, obviously, which isn't something I love doing. But what can you do?).

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        I'm looking to move away from Amazon, but I wouldn't want to discount it entirely as a future sales-base.
        No; I can understand.

        Well, most people don't mind updating and adding content to their websites like I do, anyway.

        (I'd like, one day, to try a niche literally without having a website at all, just to see if I can make it work. It's one of my "more remote plans", along with trying an ultra, ultra-competitive niche just to see how that goes! If I ever have time for any of these things. ).

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        If you're including the recommendation in a final paragraph (or so), is it safe to say that you don't actually talk about the products very much?
        I've tried bits of various different styles, without ever coming to any firm conclusions about "what's best" (and of course when you're mostly a ClickBank affiliate, it's really difficult to try to monitor this kind of stuff accurately, anyway!). But my fairly confident guess is that I say less about the products, overall, than "the average marketer". (That doesn't necessarily make it "better", though, at all.)

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        I'm struggling to see how a specific product can be pre-sold without mentioning the product very much (and in a review format).
        Yes, I see what you mean. Sometimes the issues I've discussed in the intervening non-product-promoting emails have been "with that in mind" though. But I must say I haven't done that very consistently, either, and it takes a bit of planning and (unless you want to have to write all the articles and then all the emails separately, which I don't recommend at all!) you have to write articles on suitable subjects to be able to do that later. All a bit niche-dependent and product-dependent, in other words.

        Originally Posted by thegreatpretender View Post

        Some insight here would be greatly appreciated as it's the biggest missing link in my chain at present. I can split-test my first questions in this post (point i.), but not knowing how to present the products for sale is a more significant issue.
        I hear you, completely, of course ... and I have no "certain answers", but honestly I suspect it's a less significant issue than you expect.

        I think that if you can maintain a high open-rate, that's about all that matters, and whether you promote often/rarely, and briefly/in detail is all going to make less overall difference than you'd think. (Granted, it's obviously easier to maintain the high open-rate if you promote "a bit less", anyway, so it's perhaps a slightly circular argument!)

        All my decisions and thought-processes about what to try, with these things, have been made from the background perspective of "the purpose of each email being simply to get people to open the next email" in the belief/hope/expectation that if you just get that right, and have done everything before that point well and professionally enough to be able to get that right, then everything else from that point onward is more or less going to take care if itself and not matter too much anyway. People sometimes laugh at this, but I think there's a whole lot more in it than you'd credit it with.

        This is my own "personal bias", anyway: I came to affiliate marketing online through some initial experience in MLM (offline only), which I quite liked, and did ok with (only for a year) but it wasn't really for me in the long run. (Fortunately, because I couldn't do it now at all - I'm slightly disabled). I was, however, quite "well taught", I think ... and had it deeply instilled in me that "the primary and ultimate purpose of the meeting is simply to arrange the next meeting and that as long as you do that, everything else will take care of itself in the long run". This did seem to be true. And I think, however odd it sounds, that a very similar principle applies to email marketing, too. It really is all about continuity! As long as you don't lose people, eventually half of them buy something. I aim for 50% of my subscribers, at some point during a long email series, to buy one or more products. (I don't always quite achieve that, I think, but that's the intention.)

        The big difference between the two is that with this business, you have a whole lot more to do before you ever get that far in the first place.

        .
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  • Profile picture of the author JSammy
    Despite the disagreements in this thread, there is a ton of info here. Please argue more
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