A Business Model that anyone can start, five figure month potential.

by LMC
73 replies
Hello Warriors,

I got a new business model we are currently testing out and working on and wanted to share with the community here. The model is amazing because your customers come to you automatically! I know there have been a few posts that reflect on offline business strategies, but the problem is a lot of people are hindered by the idea that they have to talk and promote themselves.

Thus, we are creating a system in which this wouldn't be a problem for any average joe to setup an create.

- Anyone can do this in their own local area
- So far we earned $582/Month with $4,000 in backend sales still pending.

Your Investment Cost

$110 - to start


The Setup

1) Open SuperPages or YellowPages and if not in the US, another large directory that has proven business buyers. It should show if they have a website or not.

Find twenty business's that don't have a website.
Do a search to see if they have registered their own domain name, for example, Pete's Pool Hall, www.petespoolhall.com

We use godaddy with a promo code to 20 for around $110

2) Grab the domain name if it is not registered, if it is, find a new business.

3) On the domain name, simple put, this website is available for the business owner, and then have a link that say's, "Are you the business owner? Acquire your website!"

4) This link then goes to a contact form in which the fill out.

Warning

To free yourself from cybersquatting, do not rent the domain name for profit, but rent the website and hand them the domain name for free or break even as a trusting lead generation tool

Let them discover the domain is taken, and when they contact you, GIVE it to them for the exact price you paid to register it. Better yet, contact them first and offer it to them for the registration fee that you paid. This will open doors for you and you'll gain the trust of many businesses you do this for. The law of reciprosity is a powerful thing. - Gene Pimental

Why this Setup?


It is known that business owners will search their name on the Internet from time to time, and if they don't own their domain name yet, you will now own it, and since it will match their search... Once they do a search of their business name, all of a sudden they will be flabbergasted of a www.theirbusiness.com sitting on the #1 spot of Google.

Clicking with anticipation, as the business owner, you will receive interest.


What is Next?

They will contact you, and you follow up by creating a basic wordpress website with general stock information, design it nicely and propose that they can rent the website from you for $97-$197 per month, we are still testing prices...

They do it?

Give them their login information, give them a free wordpress report so they know how to use it themselves.

Cash in for months for setting the system up!


----------------------------
Future Tests
----------------------------


We are going to do a huge promotion in September, buying 200 business names, running the rents at $97/M.

So far from our test of 20 business's we grabbed 6 paying $97 per month. However, more money is earned from backend sales.

----------------------------
Why you should start right now?
----------------------------

It is a numbers game... no marketing is necessary because the business owner will find you through their own name!

For $7-$10 o get the domain name for a year to test out a strategy to make minimum $1,000 that year on that $7-$10 investment is just smart.


The Growing Potential

We saw with our initial tests a 30% conversion, it took 5 months so far to receive our business.
If one was to setup 200 domains in their area and sit on it until the business's start to come after you, you can have 60 or so signed up at $97+ per month... you can obviously see the five figure growth.




In any case, that is the model, thanks!
#$xx #business #model #month #potential #requires #work
  • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
    This model works. However, as to not be considered an extortionist or cybersquatter (which IS the case if you're registering someone elses' business name specifically so that they will pay you), you should consider modifying this strategy. Let them discover the domain is taken, and when they contact you, GIVE it to them for the exact price you paid to register it. Better yet, contact them first and offer it to them for the registration fee that you paid. This will open doors for you and you'll gain the trust of many businesses you do this for. The law of reciprosity is a powerful thing.
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  • Profile picture of the author rhelaine
    if you put "are you hte business owner" it means you know you are squatting their domain...not sure it is very legal to do that.
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Hey,

    Well, while the case has never come up as you are squatting my domain name. You are probably right.

    But...

    We are not renting the domain, but renting the website we build on the follow up. If they do present it to be cyber squatting a simple, here is your domain name then, let me know if you need web design services will handle the situation.

    So...

    to add to it, I guess a disclaimer at the bottom saying if you are the business owner and do not wish to have a website, please acquire your name here, and that would just be the expense cost to break even.
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    • Profile picture of the author kameleon
      This is probably cybersquatting.
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny Slater
    Any time you buy a domain name of someone else's business with the express purpose of selling the domain to them for a profit it is considered cyber squatting and is very illegal to do so.
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Johnny,

    So as explained above... don't sell the name for profit, but sell your services. Use the domain name as a trust lead generation tool.
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  • Profile picture of the author rhelaine
    still....

    but your honnor i didn't rob the bank to make money...i just wanted to market to the cops that would show up....
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    rhelaine,

    That makes no sense in this context, but thanks for the input.
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  • Profile picture of the author rhelaine
    you can't do something illegal and shield yourself behind "but i make money legally" ....

    The truth is the name does not belong to you...and you are buying nonetheless to make money out of people that legaly own the name.
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Cybersquatting (also known as domain squatting), according to the United States federal law known as the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, is registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else. The cybersquatter then offers to sell the domain to the person or company who owns a trademark contained within the name at an inflated price.

    he Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (also known as Truth in Domain Names Act), a United States federal law enacted in 1999, is part of A bill to amend the provisions of title 17, United States Code, and the Communications Act of 1934, relating to copyright licensing and carriage of broadcast signals by satellite (S. 1948). It makes people who register domain names that are either trademarks or individual's names with the sole intent of selling the rights of the domain name to the trademark holder or individual for a profit liable to civil action. It was sponsored by Senator Trent Lott on November 17, 1999, and enacted on November 29 of the same year. The ACPA is codified at 15 U.S.C. § 1125(d).

    -------------------------------------------------------

    Bottom line, don't sell the domain name for profit or bad mouth the company. and your not doing anything illegal, and it is not robbing them or a bank
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Diamond
      First off, IANAL (I am not a lawyer) and I doubt that anyone else on this thread is either. That said, I do have some experience reading legal documents and I think that anyone who's seriously considering this "business model" ought to read this one - Cybertelecom :: ACPA.

      In particular it goes into some detail about what tests the courts have used to establish bad faith on the part of the alleged cybersquatter. Here's one of the key criteria:

      the person's registration or acquisition of multiple domain names which the person knows are identical or confusingly similar to marks of others that are distinctive at the time of registration of such domain names, or dilutive of famous marks of others that are famous at the time of registration of such domain names, without regard to the goods or services of the parties
      Bottom line: If I were a lawyer I would not advise my clients to try this.
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      • Profile picture of the author Will Edwards
        Originally Posted by Steve Diamond View Post

        First off, IANAL (I am not a lawyer) and I doubt that anyone else on this thread is either. That said, I do have some experience reading legal documents and I think that anyone who's seriously considering this "business model" ought to read this one - Cybertelecom :: ACPA.

        In particular it goes into some detail about what tests the courts have used to establish bad faith on the part of the alleged cybersquatter. Here's one of the key criteria:



        Bottom line: If I were a lawyer I would not advise my clients to try this.
        INAL Either (lol)

        However, the use of the word 'marks' I believe refers to Trademarks. There's a difference between Trademarks and Business names, so I think the OP may have a valid business model.

        In any case, I am a fan of out-of-the-box-thinking and enjoyed reading about the idea.

        Will
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by LMC View Post

      Cybersquatting (also known as domain squatting), according to the United States federal law known as the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, is registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else. The cybersquatter then offers to sell the domain to the person or company who owns a trademark contained within the name at an inflated price.

      he Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (also known as Truth in Domain Names Act), a United States federal law enacted in 1999, is part of A bill to amend the provisions of title 17, United States Code, and the Communications Act of 1934, relating to copyright licensing and carriage of broadcast signals by satellite (S. 1948). It makes people who register domain names that are either trademarks or individual's names with the sole intent of selling the rights of the domain name to the trademark holder or individual for a profit liable to civil action. It was sponsored by Senator Trent Lott on November 17, 1999, and enacted on November 29 of the same year. The ACPA is codified at 15 U.S.C. § 1125(d).

      -------------------------------------------------------

      Bottom line, don't sell the domain name for profit or bad mouth the company. and your not doing anything illegal, and it is not robbing them or a bank
      LMC,

      The definition above is TAINTED! The REAL definition is:

      Cybersquatting (also known as domain squatting), according to the United States federal law known as the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, is registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else.

      The rest is not actually in the UDRP, etc... AT ALL! A LOT of cases have been won that make that CLEAR!

      Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Jillian Slack
      Originally Posted by LMC View Post

      Cybersquatting (also known as domain squatting), according to the United States federal law known as the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, is registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else. The cybersquatter then offers to sell the domain to the person or company who owns a trademark contained within the name at an inflated price.

      he Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (also known as Truth in Domain Names Act), a United States federal law enacted in 1999, is part of A bill to amend the provisions of title 17, United States Code, and the Communications Act of 1934, relating to copyright licensing and carriage of broadcast signals by satellite (S. 1948). It makes people who register domain names that are either trademarks or individual's names with the sole intent of selling the rights of the domain name to the trademark holder or individual for a profit liable to civil action. It was sponsored by Senator Trent Lott on November 17, 1999, and enacted on November 29 of the same year. The ACPA is codified at 15 U.S.C. § 1125(d).

      -------------------------------------------------------

      Bottom line, don't sell the domain name for profit or bad mouth the company. and your not doing anything illegal, and it is not robbing them or a bank

      Read this a few more times and maybe it will start to sink in.
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  • Profile picture of the author LADWebDesign
    While I have registered domain names for many different companies, and may have registered the domains in my own name - as a "web marketing adviser" - it was because the business owner was so technologically hands-off. Many business owners barely check their own email, or only use hotmail or gmail accounts, and change the email address when the account gets too filled with spam.

    Then they don't receive the notice that their domain name is up for renewal.

    I do not cybersquat the name. I register the name in the business name, with my name and email address as the contact. Most times, all that is needed is to add me as the technology contact.

    I have never tried the OP's strategy though.
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Hey,

    Well, I'm definitely going to call my copyright a trademark lawyer that does deal with this stuff and find out what can or can't be done...

    For now, take it as a concept, and idea, maybe change things to your likings...

    I'm interested in knowing what can or can't be done because so far results have been great
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Diamond
      Originally Posted by LMC View Post

      Well, I'm definitely going to call my copyright a trademark lawyer that does deal with this stuff and find out what can or can't be done...
      Please post back and let us know. I'd be happy to be proved wrong. OTOH, remember that lawyers are paid to keep their clients out of trouble (and get them out of trouble when necessary), so they tend to give very conservative opinions about this type of issue.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
    In my opinion, even outside of the legal considerations, it is a glaring ethical issue.
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  • Profile picture of the author GoGetta
    I think this is a creative idea LMC, love your ideas! I would also be interested in knowing about the cybersquatting idea as I would be more than happy to grab 200 domains and see what happens.

    GoGetta
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  • Profile picture of the author Lightlysalted
    Personally I would be very cautious of an internet money scheme like this. It is perfectly legal to do this but the reality is that many businesses a) either have registered a relevant domain already or b) will be quite happy going for an alternative doamin than paying you money to buy a specific one. In order for this to work you would have to buy .net, .com, .org, .biz etc. and this gets expensive. I really don't see the business potential in it and if anything i think it would lose money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Leads4Builders
    I don't know about the legalities, but as a business owner I'd probably be put off if some guy contatcted me offering my domain name to rent a site. I don't know if that builds trust...seems like it would backfire
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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      • Profile picture of the author garyk1968
        Originally Posted by alexa_s View Post

        Likewise. I'd be extremely put off and certainly wouldn't want to do business with them. (But maybe not everyone feels that way?)
        Agreed, there have been companies here in the UK calling businesses and saying your domain is available and we can register it for £50, of course when I got calls like this I used to say let me think about it, put the phone down and go and register it myself for £9. The bottom line is, legal or not its not a very good start to a new business relationship. They should be built on trust and credibility and this model offers neither.
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    • Profile picture of the author xiaophil
      Most of these posts sound like a load of FUD from a bunch of scaredy-cats.

      Can't you see that you could be positioning yourself as the expert/hero that's saving these people from potential cybersquatting?

      As the local internet expert you have made it your mission to improve the online visibility and marketing opportunities of local companies. As part of your introduction you have identified and secured a great domain name on their behalf and absolutely free of charge thus guaranteeing their premium location on the global interweb.

      The name is theirs for a few bucks (no profit) and by the way here is an example of the kind of site you could have that's ready now for a nominal fee, no obligation.

      We are a proactive company and keep on top of all the latest web developments - please have a chat with Mr Happy Client who we recently set up with a similar package.

      etc etc

      IANAL and this is not legal advice but here's a few options:

      1) Don't do anything, which is probably legal.

      2) Hire a few Lawyers and take the average of their advice.

      3) Become a Lawyer, then you know. (This could be cheaper than 2 in the long run.)

      4) Use sensory acuity and common sense to realize that to be doing something wrong you probably need to have malicious intent and there is none of that here.

      5) Take the risk anyway and if someone sues you over reserving a $5 domain name then fund your defense from the $20k/month you're making from passively hosting blogs and selling upgrades.

      Nice one Mr. LMC
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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        • Profile picture of the author xiaophil
          Originally Posted by alexa_s View Post

          No, I don't look at it that way at all. And I wouldn't see it that way if someone did it to me. I don't suggest they would necessarily have done anything illegal, but I certainly wouldn't be doing business with them after getting "my" domain-name back from them.
          Originally Posted by DougRenz;

          if I was a business owner and found my domain taken... simply I would be very upset... not a cool idea!
          I really don't understand these responses.

          1) You're not "getting your domain name back" because it was never yours in the first place.

          2) If you want it then it's either for the same cost as registering it yourself or as others have suggested - completely free.

          3) If you don't want it then don't take it - you are no better or worse off than before considering the offer.

          Remember the target market here are businesses which are already spending for advertising in business directories (so you know they want to get some visibility and are willing to pay for it) but who currently have no online presence.

          As far as I can see you would be delivering something close to a turnkey solution very quickly and for a reasonable cost, and you would have plenty of opportunities for upgrades and back-end sales.

          It's Win-Win.

          If the business owners in question shared your sentiments then surely they would just take the domain name and be done with it, but evidently from LMCs testing there are a good proportion who appreciate bold, assertive behavior.

          Also, if I understand the OP correctly, the proportion not counted as conversions are not necessarily rejections as he has adopted a reverse-followup tactic which means they simply haven't contacted him yet.

          It would be great if LMC could tell us what percentage of the prospects have contacted him but only wanted the domain name, and also whether he has met any who feel their rights have somehow been violated.

          Regards,
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      • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
        Originally Posted by xiaophil View Post

        Can't you see that you could be positioning yourself as the expert/hero that's saving these people from potential cybersquatting?
        If you're willing to hand it over to them at cost, yes. If you're not going to release it to them unless they buy something from you, no. That makes you the cybersquatter.

        Let's not confuse this issue with generic business names that have the potential to be sold to many other businesses or individuals. When I use the term cybersquatter, I'm talking about registering a domain that is clearly intended for one particular company or individual.

        Also, there is a legal definition to the term cybersquatter and there is a common use definition of the word.
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      • Profile picture of the author seasoned
        Originally Posted by xiaophil View Post

        Most of these posts sound like a load of FUD from a bunch of scaredy-cats.

        Can't you see that you could be positioning yourself as the expert/hero that's saving these people from potential cybersquatting?

        As the local internet expert you have made it your mission to improve the online visibility and marketing opportunities of local companies. As part of your introduction you have identified and secured a great domain name on their behalf and absolutely free of charge thus guaranteeing their premium location on the global interweb.

        The name is theirs for a few bucks (no profit) and by the way here is an example of the kind of site you could have that's ready now for a nominal fee, no obligation.

        We are a proactive company and keep on top of all the latest web developments - please have a chat with Mr Happy Client who we recently set up with a similar package.

        etc etc

        IANAL and this is not legal advice but here's a few options:

        1) Don't do anything, which is probably legal.

        2) Hire a few Lawyers and take the average of their advice.

        3) Become a Lawyer, then you know. (This could be cheaper than 2 in the long run.)

        4) Use sensory acuity and common sense to realize that to be doing something wrong you probably need to have malicious intent and there is none of that here.

        5) Take the risk anyway and if someone sues you over reserving a $5 domain name then fund your defense from the $20k/month you're making from passively hosting blogs and selling upgrades.

        Nice one Mr. LMC
        What a DUMB thing to say! One of the ways cybersquaters get names is from EXPIRED domains! If you register a name, and let it lapse, it is like throwing blood into water your friend is in while sharks are nearby!

        1. It isn't legal. GRANTED you might not get caught. GRANTED people probably won't sue if you give them the domain NAME(LMC you ARE renting the DOMAIN)!!!!! GRANTED, if they sue, they might not be found to have standing if you will give them the name, but you NEVER know!

        2. Average of their advice? FUNNY!

        3. You know what they say about someone who is pro per!

        4. It CAN be seen as malicious, and he obviously has intent.

        5. SOME people have sued for far more than monetary damages seem to appear.

        BTW I, for one, wouldn't pay someone after he did that with me.

        Steve
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        • Profile picture of the author xiaophil
          Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

          What a DUMB thing to say! One of the ways cybersquaters get names is from EXPIRED domains! If you register a name, and let it lapse, it is like throwing blood into water your friend is in while sharks are nearby!

          1. It isn't legal. GRANTED you might not get caught. GRANTED people probably won't sue if you give them the domain NAME(LMC you ARE renting the DOMAIN)!!!!! GRANTED, if they sue, they might not be found to have standing if you will give them the name, but you NEVER know!

          2. Average of their advice? FUNNY!

          3. You know what they say about someone who is pro per!

          4. It CAN be seen as malicious, and he obviously has intent.

          5. SOME people have sued for far more than monetary damages seem to appear.

          BTW I, for one, wouldn't pay someone after he did that with me.

          Steve
          That reminds me.

          Went to visit my friend's great-grandfather the other day.

          Poor chap's starting to lose it a bit, sits about most of the time spluttering and spouting nonsense to passers by.

          He believes he's an authority on pretty much everything and won't turn on his hearing aid because it "puts stress on all the parts" and wears them out.

          They upped his medication but it doesn't seem to help.

          We just smile kindly until visiting time is over.
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Hey Everyone,

    Here is the update:

    I spoke to my lawyer... yes a real lawyer, licensed in New York, and he said, based on what you tell me on the phone you are doing nothing illlegal, that is, by not selling the domain and either giving it to them for free or sending it for same cost.

    However, he did say to send him an email on it, to confirm the concept.

    I don't want to give any unlawful advice here, so I will confirm it once I receive my confirmation.

    For the naysayers,

    This post is about thinking above and beyond placing a website on the Internet and hoping to receive traffic.

    Create a system in which traffic comes to you, the buyer starts asking you questions not you asking the buyer questions.

    This post is not intended to be the only plan to follow but a concept in which we are testing and a idea for you to expand on.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdInventive
      Originally Posted by LMC View Post

      and he said, based on what you tell me on the phone you are doing nothing legal,
      I think you mean 'you are doing nothing illegal' ?
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Haha, my bad... thanks for the fix.
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      Ok, since cybersquatting seems to be the heart of the issue here, let me ask this then. I have a client that I have been working on their webstore now for a few weeks. He had to settle for a .org domain name because the .com version was being held by someone in the UK who wants $2000 for it. We know that he did not pay that much for the name, but is there anything under the cybersquatting law that we might be able to do?

      I appreciate any input here as my client has had this business name for a few years now.
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      • Profile picture of the author davezan
        Originally Posted by CmdrStidd View Post

        Ok, since cybersquatting seems to be the heart of the issue here, let me ask this then. I have a client that I have been working on their webstore now for a few weeks. He had to settle for a .org domain name because the .com version was being held by someone in the UK who wants $2000 for it. We know that he did not pay that much for the name, but is there anything under the cybersquatting law that we might be able to do?

        I appreciate any input here as my client has had this business name for a few years now.
        IANAL.

        Your client might if: a) s/he has a trademark, and b) the other party has really
        no arguably legitimate use for it. Then again, having a trademark doesn't mean
        one gets the domain anyway.

        One catch with your question, though, is your client is appearingly wanting to
        get something that doesn't belong to him/her that another potentially got fair
        and square. If your client makes more than $2000 a month, then surely buying
        it for $2000 only and recouping it in a month or so shouldn't be a problem?

        It may be for the principle. But the other party probably has too, even if your
        client (or you?) don't agree with theirs.

        If you or your client wish to pursue the legal route further, then a lawyer is the
        only one who should be consulted. I know some who happen to be in New York
        as the OP intimated earlier.

        And LMC, I wouldn't say it takes no work. That might mislead few newbies into
        thinking that. :p
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        • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
          Originally Posted by davezan View Post

          IANAL.

          Your client might if: a) s/he has a trademark, and b) the other party has really
          no arguably legitimate use for it. Then again, having a trademark doesn't mean
          one gets the domain anyway.

          One catch with your question, though, is your client is appearingly wanting to
          get something that doesn't belong to him/her that another potentially got fair
          and square. If your client makes more than $2000 a month, then surely buying
          it for $2000 only and recouping it in a month or so shouldn't be a problem?

          It may be for the principle. But the other party probably has too, even if your
          client (or you?) don't agree with theirs.

          If you or your client wish to pursue the legal route further, then a lawyer is the
          only one who should be consulted. I know some who happen to be in New York
          as the OP intimated earlier.

          And LMC, I wouldn't say it takes no work. That might mislead few newbies into
          thinking that. :p
          Thanks for the info. While my client has been functioning under this name for a few years now, he is not making all that much after expenses. He started off with a B&M location and he had someone who called themselves a web designer construct his site. Unfortunately, Michael Jackson's chimp, Bubbles, could do a better job then they did. They did not even use a proper shopping cart in the setup. I am currently redoing the entire site for him but he found out about this other person sitting on the .com name and he is doing just that since there is no website up on that domain. Anyhow, that is the situation. Even if he was making $2000 a month, I do not feel it is right to hog a domain name like this. However, my personal view is not necessarily the legal view.
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  • Profile picture of the author sts2k
    nice concept and if it works hey it works and i understand that you arent selling the domain for profit but the service... i think this is something thats in the gray area at best..
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  • Profile picture of the author derrickp
    No work, money and having a business do not go hand in hand
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  • Profile picture of the author rivulguy
    This should be against the law even though it probably isn't, IMHO. I've always felt that buying domains for profit is one of the lower forms of entrepreneurship.
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    • Profile picture of the author joshril
      Originally Posted by rivulguy View Post

      This should be against the law even though it probably isn't, IMHO. I've always felt that buying domains for profit is one of the lower forms of entrepreneurship.
      Sorry to be rude, but most of these comments are idiotic... the OP NEVER said anything about buying domains for a profit.... He is not profiting off of the domain in any way!

      This is not cybersquatting from what I've read. I think as long as you are willing to give away or sell the domain for what you paid for it to anyone regardless of whether they use you for additional services, there should be no issues with this.

      I think there is enough profit to offer to give the domains away in my opinion. It also builds good will. Who is going to sue you if you are giving them a domain?? Even if you charged the reg fee.. geez...

      Great ideas! I see no issues with this method if done properly.
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  • Profile picture of the author BizBooks
    if the name is generic, I'm not sur eits cybersquatting.

    especially since there might be 50 businesses across the USa called "john's auto repair".

    so would buying www.johnsautorepair.com be squatting?

    I dont think so... but then again!
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Murphy
    A slight twist to this method that keeps it legal, ethical and helpful:

    Do the same original research to find out what businesses don't have websites, and have their website names available, but don't purchase the names.

    Instead, put a letter together (if you don't want to call them or visit them) to let them know that their business domain name is available, and that they should secure it right away so no one else does.

    Offer to do that for them if they'd prefer (do it at-cost and give full ownership over to them to continue building the goodwill and helpfulness), then you will have a natural opening to share your services, such as web hosting, web design, SEO, lead generation, etc.

    Now I realize that this isn't them coming to you, but it is a creative way to get in front of them, shows you have their best interest in mind, creates goodwill, presents a natural opening to share your services, and it keeps you legal.

    Dennis
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    • Profile picture of the author Vikuna2009+
      Originally Posted by Dennis Murphy View Post

      A slight twist to this method that keeps it legal, ethical and helpful:

      Do the same original research to find out what businesses don't have websites, and have their website names available, but don't purchase the names.

      Instead, put a letter together (if you don't want to call them or visit them) to let them know that their business domain name is available, and that they should secure it right away so no one else does.

      Offer to do that for them if they'd prefer (do it at-cost and give full ownership over to them to continue building the goodwill and helpfulness), then you will have a natural opening to share your services, such as web hosting, web design, SEO, lead generation, etc.

      Now I realize that this isn't them coming to you, but it is a creative way to get in front of them, shows you have their best interest in mind, creates goodwill, presents a natural opening to share your services, and it keeps you legal.

      Dennis


      Just my thoughts. The only negative thing with "your" method is that by the time they contact you, the name might be gone . However, you'll probably have 85-90% to work with!
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    • Originally Posted by Dennis Murphy View Post

      A slight twist to this method that keeps it legal, ethical and helpful:

      Do the same original research to find out what businesses don't have websites, and have their website names available, but don't purchase the names.

      Instead, put a letter together (if you don't want to call them or visit them) to let them know that their business domain name is available, and that they should secure it right away so no one else does.

      Offer to do that for them if they'd prefer (do it at-cost and give full ownership over to them to continue building the goodwill and helpfulness), then you will have a natural opening to share your services, such as web hosting, web design, SEO, lead generation, etc.

      Now I realize that this isn't them coming to you, but it is a creative way to get in front of them, shows you have their best interest in mind, creates goodwill, presents a natural opening to share your services, and it keeps you legal.

      Dennis
      Not bad. But I think a better route would be to buy the domain for them and call them on the phone. Tell them you found that their domain name wasnt taken and you were afraid some one would register it and try to sell it for $1000. Then, just GIVE them the domain.

      If they agree, transfer the domain to their name, and offer your services. If that doesnt build trust, I dont know what would.

      However, I am going to give the system in the OP a try.

      GENE
      Dont you have a guide that explains something like this in the War Room?
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Hey

    Well it looks like this turned into an interesting thread. My lawyer has not yet gotten back to me with a written confirmation, but for those that are saying they would not to business with a company that did this because they registered "YOUR" domain name, I believe are just be envious of the idea itself.

    Most business's who have not purchased their own domain name at this point don't understand technology, don't know how to utilize the Internet, and don't know how to register a domain name.

    For you guys, this service is not for you so I bet you wont do service with us/a company that does this because you know how to do it.

    However, put your shoes in the eyes of the ultimate customer, one who has no idea how to utilize the Internet and no time to learn, and in their search they see a webpage that says to them, "this is your domain name for your business, pick it up here", the conversion is extremely high because it is personally targeted to their business.

    Everyone we spoke to from our tests were extremely happy they found their domain name registered from us because they finally got to speak to someone that knew what they were talking about...
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    • Profile picture of the author MaskedMarketer
      Originally Posted by LMC View Post

      Everyone we spoke to from our tests were extremely happy they found their domain name registered from us because they finally got to speak to someone that knew what they were talking about...
      LMC,

      Great post and good to hear your customers are happy with your services.

      the replies from your OP read more like an ethics or legal board lol.
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  • Profile picture of the author DougRenz
    if I was a business owner and found my domain taken... simply I would be very upset... not a cool idea!
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Wants a again....

    Doug, the domain name is not taken.

    It is delivered to the business owner, but no worries thanks for the input
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Murphy
    Not bad. But I think a better route would be to buy the domain for them and call them on the phone. Tell them you found that their domain name wasnt taken and you were afraid some one would register it and try to sell it for $1000. Then, just GIVE them the domain.
    Bottom line, we all have different comfort levels, and if you have no problem purchasing their domain name ahead of time, then go for it. I'd imagine most owners would love this to be completely hands off.

    Also, when you call them and offer the domain name, tell them that you will add their website and business information to Google Local for them once their website is hosted, designed and up and running. When they ask how to get their site up and running - well, you'd be happy to discuss those options with them.

    Dennis
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    • Profile picture of the author winston
      Originally Posted by Dennis Murphy View Post

      Bottom line, we all have different comfort levels, and if you have no problem purchasing their domain name ahead of time, then go for it. I'd imagine most owners would love this to be completely hands off.

      Also, when you call them and offer the domain name, tell them that you will add their website and business information to Google Local for them once their website is hosted, designed and up and running. When they ask how to get their site up and running - well, you'd be happy to discuss those options with them.

      Dennis
      I think this is a great idea.
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Phil,

    We will be running a 200 domain name test, because we only registered 20 domain names there would not be enough statistical references to give an accurate conversion.

    However, here is what we saw:

    - 20 Registered Domain Names
    - Response from Business Owner took between 2 Weeks - 2 Months
    - From 20 names, 10 contacted us.
    - From the 10, 6 Followed through

    From the Four non-buyers

    - 1 asked what if I don't use your services
    - 1 replied with a I'll get back to you on this
    - 2 we did not get replies from

    From the Six Buyers

    - 2 asked what this is all about?
    - 2 asked how they can get their name and a website
    - 2 just hit the submit form and their name and number, sold them on the phone.
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    • Profile picture of the author Leads4Builders
      LMC,

      You may have shared this already, but can you show us one of these pages? It'd be helpful to see what these business owners are seeing when they find and click on their domain
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    • Profile picture of the author gianne2705
      I got the idea but don't you think buyers will hesitate to provide their information on the log in form?Unless,they much prefer to talk to the person itself.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
      Great idea, but can I suggest a potential major issue here?

      This could run very close (if not already) to trademark violation.

      If you register a domain under the name of a local business' name which is more than likely protected by trademark, then that could lead to a legal case and a cease and disist letter being sent to you (plus fines for potential loss or damages).

      Have you looked into that side of things?
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  • Profile picture of the author LMC
    Hey Leads4Builders,

    As of right now we don't have any of those pages up because we tested 20, but we are going to test 200 very soon, and I will post one or two of the domain names so you see the landing page.

    Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author Droopy Dawg
    Still a cool biz model... just cut out the part where you buy the names in advance, and call the businesses and let them know what their domain names COULD BE, and their availability.

    Even if they "do their own thing" and buys the name on their own... at least you've contacted them and put a bug in their ear that you could build the site for them.

    At least that's what I've been doing... and it's been OK.
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    • Profile picture of the author jcaviani
      The model is child's play compared to what you could be doing. It's a good start, though.

      Keep in mind, the idea of business is to acquire and KEEP a customer not to burn through them like they are in infinite supply.

      Does anyone else find it hilarious that the gurus, now almost out of rabbits or variations for the dream theme, are now (or soon will be) falling all over themselves to talk about REAL business?

      Too bad your desperation marketing won't work for business owners with an IQ greater than 5. And, you might actually have to speak to them and build a relationship. Say it isn't so, Joe.

      Keep trying, though. Someday you will figure out business is only not only about how much money you and your circle jerk of bought off friends brag about shaking out of the desperate and undereducated (Ponzi Scheme), but about quality.

      If these guys are so smart why are they selling their ideas for chump change and a victory lap instead of scaling (and I don't consider emailing to Imers scaling) them?
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  • Profile picture of the author Ichabod
    Love the creative thinking, but why not try this:

    1. Register the domain (currently $1.99 @ GoDaddy, with code)
    2. contact businesses whose name is a good fit for the domain (either by email, phone, letter, postcard)...email is preferred --it's free.
    3. simply give the domain to them

    What's the catch?
    Nothing, really.
    Offer to build the website and sign them up through your hosting account
    affiliate link (it's what...$100 per sign up w/Hostgator?) or offer hosting (if you have a reseller account) for a monthly fee.
    You could then offer SEO maintenance fees, auto responders, etc. etc.
    on the back end for more $$.

    Of course, this is the ol' "Make money by giving away free websites" method.
    Then again, it's no different than offering services after the fact.
    However, by giving them something upfront (that they wouldn't normally think of and offer it @ no cost to them) you get your foot in the proverbial door.
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  • Profile picture of the author Preben Frenning
    If you register the domain, then contact them, telling them you have "protected" the name for being taken, and that you got it, using a mulit-register coupon and got it REALLY cheap for them, why would they hate/sue you?

    Expose your email, and tell them that you can give it to them for the incredibly low price you have already purchased it for.

    If they ask you why you did it, tell them that there are many "thieves" online, and that you did it to protect them, and that you are hoping to get them as a new client. ( Which you, considering the basic statistics, would.)

    Like someone stated earlier, just appear as the good guy, and even make them thank you for securing their domain! I could EASILY do that ANY DAY! (I have a few years experience in sales though...)

    NOTE* This will most likely NOT work for other countries than english-speaking, as you often need a company to do so, and you have a limit for how many domains you can have for each company.
    In Norway where I live, you can only have 20 .no domains, which is the most commonly used domain extension for businesses over here. Too bad, since this technique looks awesome...

    Thanks for sharing though!
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    • Profile picture of the author davezan
      Originally Posted by Preben Frenning View Post

      why would they hate/sue you?
      Oh, just go through some of the posts on the first page, and you'll see how a
      few hate this idea anyway for whatever reason. But as long as the OP or any
      other doesn't infringe a party's established trademark right or any applicable
      law on this, then it's maybe...maybe...A-OK to proceed.

      On a related note, be careful if you use this idea for personal name domains.
      Especially if you're in the U.S., lookup cyberpiracy protections for individuals.
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  • Profile picture of the author jasonl70
    I'd like to point out that probably 99.9% of the people out there have no idea what cybersquatting is, and would not have any issue this when there's a simple and clear path to transfer the name to them. Heck, the vast majority have no idea how to even get a domain name in the first place.

    For those who still have heartache over this, I propose this:

    couldn't you just register it in their name to begin with? Seems this would work if it was actually the local guy's business who wants it and not just another business who happens to have the same name..
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  • Profile picture of the author Preben Frenning
    @jasonl70 - THAT seems like a good idea. The nall you have done is actually registering their domain for free in their name. BUT I think it might be worse on the "legal" side, depending on what you put on the site itself. (If you add ANY content on a website in their name without them knowing it, it might be considered identity theft?)

    @Davezan - You've taken it completely out of context. You forgot to quote the rest of the sentence: "If you register the domain, then contact them, telling them you have "protected" the name for being taken, and that you got it, using a multi-register coupon and got it REALLY cheap for them," THEN why would they hate you

    If you explain it to any business this way, you make it hard for them to hate you.
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  • Profile picture of the author drewjones
    Banned
    This is fine only if the company does not have a "trademark" and is not filed with the us patents office.

    If it is however...your looking at major lawsuits.

    It almost happened to me.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
      Originally Posted by drewjones View Post

      This is fine only if the company does not have a "trademark" and is not filed with the us patents office.

      If it is however...your looking at major lawsuits.

      It almost happened to me.
      Exactly my suspicions Drew. I think people need to be VERY precautions about this sort of thing if they want to stay in biz and out of trouble.

      Legislation is a bit more tight outside the realms of the Internet.
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      • Profile picture of the author Webtigerz
        Banned
        Interesting concept, but may appear to be a bit risky no matter how it is approached...
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        • Profile picture of the author xiaophil
          This could run very close (if not already) to trademark violation.
          This is fine only if the company does not have a "trademark" and is not filed with the us patents office.
          Why would trademarks ever be an issue if you are not trading under that mark?

          Looks like more FUD to me.
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  • Profile picture of the author Micheal Perkins
    A twist on this for anyone concerned about violation of any laws could be something like this.

    If you have a website setup about your local marketing services then setup a quick website as a directory on your site. Just put up a page about what could be there for their site.

    You could get a free template and make some easy changes to it, or use a WP blog and throw in a custom theme. Either of these could probably be done in about 30minutes once you have done it a few times.

    Now send the business owner the letter telling them about their domain name being available. Offer to be the one stop shop for them by offering to buy the domain name for them, build the site, and host it. You could approach it from that direction instead of buying the domain first and hosting it.

    I'm not an attorney, but I fail to understand how buying a domain name and offering to sell it to the owner is trademark infringement. You are not doing business under that name or trying to profit using that name. I the example given the name has been purchased and offered to the owner of the business for the price paid. Then the hope is that services can be sold from there.
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    • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
      Originally Posted by Micheal Perkins View Post

      I'm not an attorney, but I fail to understand how buying a domain name and offering to sell it to the owner is trademark infringement.

      See this: http://www.keytlaw.com/urls/acpa.htm


      "In 1999, the United States Congress passed the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act which generally prohibits using a domain name containing another's trademark with an intent to profit. That law allows penalties of up to $100,000 per domain name abuse incident; anyone who in bad faith uses, sells, or tries to sell a domain name that infringes another's trademark may be fined.

      Offering to sell a domain name may be used to establish "bad faith" and could expose you to serious liability. This new law may cover domains containing people's names if those names are considered trademarks (for example, www.jacknicklaus.com). The use of a domain containing another's trademark also may violate pre-existing trademark law."
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      • Profile picture of the author Micheal Perkins
        Originally Posted by Gene Pimentel View Post

        anyone who in bad faith uses, sells, or tries to sell a domain name that infringes another's trademark may be fined.
        Don't take me wrong, I'm not trying to argue here, just offer a point of debate. Obviously an attorney would be able to offer better advice, but here is my point of view.

        Let's say I buy a domain of an established business and send them a letter saying I purchased the domain for $9 for one year and will sell it to them for $9. I further explain that as an Internet Marketing consultant I have seen people try and exploit the domains of established businesses and sell them for extreme markups. I wanted to keep that from happening to you.

        Then tell them if they want it they can pay you for it. You can also offer advice on what they could do with their domain. Then keep that letter on file.

        Now in the event a complaint is ever filed that you were in violation of any of the above described infractions, pull out the letter and the billing invoice that you received when you purchased the domain.

        Now let someone try to prove you tried to profit on the sale of that domain when you offered it for what you paid for it (0 profit). Then let them show where the bad faith is in what you told them the reason you did this for them is.
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        • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
          Originally Posted by Micheal Perkins View Post

          Don't take me wrong, I'm not trying to argue here, just offer a point of debate. Obviously an attorney would be able to offer better advice, but here is my point of view.

          Let's say I buy a domain of an established business and send them a letter saying I purchased the domain for $9 for one year and will sell it to them for $9. I further explain that as an Internet Marketing consultant I have seen people try and exploit the domains of established businesses and sell them for extreme markups. I wanted to keep that from happening to you.

          Then tell them if they want it they can pay you for it. You can also offer advice on what they could do with their domain. Then keep that letter on file.

          Now in the event a complaint is ever filed that you were in violation of any of the above described infractions, pull out the letter and the billing invoice that you received when you purchased the domain.

          Now let someone try to prove you tried to profit on the sale of that domain when you offered it for what you paid for it (0 profit). Then let them show where the bad faith is in what you told them the reason you did this for them is.
          Hi Michael,

          I personally see nothing wrong with registering a domain name for a company and giving them the option to obtain it from you for the registration cost. That's doing them a favor in anybody's book. Any they would have no grounds to file a complaint. What I have a problem with is registering their domain name and not releasing it to them unless they hire you perform whatever service you're offering them.

          It's also important to distinguish between a generic name and a specific business name. Generic names like TownPizza.com can be used by hundreds of pizza shops, if not thousands. That's fair game.
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