Would you mail a list that was a year old?

by Jeannie Crabtree 18 replies
Would you mail a list that was a year old? I usually recycle my lists at aweber, but found
one that had subscribers that stopped recieving anything but broadcasts over a year ago.

I only broadcast to that list every couple of months.

What is your take on it? Thanks.

Jeannie
#main internet marketing discussion forum #list #mail #year
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Rachel Rofe
    Might as well test it out and see if anything can be salvaged -
    certainly can't lose anything, right?

    I found an old list a while ago, and people in my mastermind had
    some great ideas on how to revitalize it...

    a) Give some great bonus content as you reintroduce yourself
    and apologize for being so quiet

    b) Put out a survey asking what they'd like to know from you if
    it's a niche you're an expert in

    c) A combination of the two
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84671].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Paul Buckley
      I would think that a list that hasn't been pummeled with deal-of-the-week offers might bereceptive especially with a few warm up emails.
      Signature

      "Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something." -Plato

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84673].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jeannie Crabtree
      Good idea Rachel, thanks for that suggestion.

      On my broadcasts, I have recieved a few complaints of spam and could not figure it out.
      But I think this group is also spam button happy. I can see if they have not heard from me
      in a long time, they are going "Jeannie who"?

      I may emphasize the unsubscribe information half way through and see if those that
      don't want to hear from me will go ahead and jump off.

      Jeannie
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84675].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author jensrsa
        You'll probably get:

        - some dead email addresses
        - some unsubscribes
        - some spam complaints

        But then you should also get some revived customers.

        No real harm in testing the list, what's left is an active list again.

        Jens
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84708].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author KimW
          I have a list (a small one) that I ahven't mailed in probably 4 years, so I am interested in these responses too.
          Kim
          Signature

          Read A Post.
          Subscribe to a Newsletter
          KimWinfrey.Com

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84775].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Jamie Iaconis
            Maybe send them that initial subscribe/confirm email
            and see how many of them click into it...

            Then you know they want information and they
            are actively still on the internet etc!!!

            Jamie
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84789].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author SolomonHuey
              I actually ran into a similar situation recently. I simply sent a broadcast to those lists (I had a few that I hadn't contacted in awhile) and basically told them why they signed up, updated them on what I'm doing, and that I'd be active in contacting them regularly again.

              I got a few spam complaints after the next couple of emails, but not one since then and I salvaged a good 95% + out of that list.

              Hopefully that helps.

              Solomon Huey
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84826].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
                Absolutely email this list but before you do it think through what your subscribers are likely to think when they get an email from you:

                1. Will they have forgotten about you and think the email is spam? (Be sure to remind them of why they got on the list, what you've given them in the past and why they should read this email).

                Acknowledge the fact that you haven't emailed them for a while...that's important. It helps people go through the process of reminding themselves about who you are and why they signed up with you.


                2. Can you design a sequence of emails that will appeal to these subscribers?

                If your first email is a pitch it's likely you'll get a lot of unsubscribes and reduce responsiveness.

                But if you plan on sending quality content once or twice before you promote any product you'll build some trust and be more likely to hold on to your subscribers and keep them buying from you long term.


                3. Consider anything else that might be an issue for the subscribers on this list.

                Really put yourself in their shoes....how they feel, what they really want.

                That will help you devise a strategy that's likely to be successful.

                Kindest regards,
                Andrew Cavanagh
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84881].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author Anna Johnson
                  Jeannie, check out this article. It addresses the exact topic you're raising and should provide some useful guidance: When To Email An Inactive List
                  Signature
                  Discover a REAL Internet marketing newsletter
                  News, comment, research, tips and more.
                  (And great freebies when you subscribe...)
                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84894].message }}
                  • Profile picture of the author Fabian Tan
                    Really spend time studying on the optimal subject line you will use to get that list to open your emails. Once you've got that first email to be opened, you're on your way.

                    Consider giving away a free gift to 'warm' up your subscribers again.

                    Fabian
                    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84980].message }}
                    • Profile picture of the author kf
                      I have a small list I only mail every few months --- and always with an offer. Then I do 2 follow-ups on the same offer -- usually over a 3 to 5 day period. It always brings sales.

                      I approach it this way:
                      You know I don't bother harassing you guys w the same offers as every Tom, Dick and Hairy Marketer (not exact wording!), but (pitch)....

                      My tone with this list is very peer-to-peer ... and in the same way that I can't stay in touch with close friends and family on a daily/weekly basis, I always get in touch if it's something important that I think will be helpful.

                      I was reluctant to do this and initially put off sending offers until I could get freebies out or warm them up, but it's been very successful - I get good open and conversion rates and no unsubscribes.

                      IMO, there's little to lose if you approach it the right way.
                      Signature
                      Those who stand for nothing, fall for anything. ~ Alexander Hamilton
                      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[84989].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author jensrsa
                Originally Posted by SolomonHuey View Post

                I simply sent a broadcast to those lists (I had a few that I hadn't contacted in awhile) and basically told them why they signed up, updated them on what I'm doing, and that I'd be active in contacting them regularly again.
                I see you have kept in contact through periodic broadcasts so they shouldn't have forgotten about you but changing the frequency in future could upset some so it would be a good idea to send them a reminder email first with your new plan of action.
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[85131].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author SolomonHuey
                  Originally Posted by jensrsa View Post

                  I see you have kept in contact through periodic broadcasts so they shouldn't have forgotten about you but changing the frequency in future could upset some so it would be a good idea to send them a reminder email first with your new plan of action.
                  I didn't keep in contact with a few of my lists at all for about a year and never made regular broadcasts. Not sure where you got that from in my response. :p

                  I had an inactive list, and to warm them up again, I sent out a broadcast that:

                  "basically told them why they signed up, updated them on what I'm doing, and that I'd be active in contacting them regularly again."
                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[85823].message }}
                  • Profile picture of the author jensrsa
                    Originally Posted by SolomonHuey View Post

                    I didn't keep in contact with a few of my lists at all for about a year and never made regular broadcasts. Not sure where you got that from in my response. :p

                    I had an inactive list, and to warm them up again, I sent out a broadcast that:

                    "basically told them why they signed up, updated them on what I'm doing, and that I'd be active in contacting them regularly again."
                    I only broadcast to that list every couple of months.
                    Sorry Solomon, I responded to Jeannie's original post using your post to suggest that she does the same but didn't make that clear

                    Jens
                    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[86146].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Eric Johnson
            I don't know why exactly you wouldn't...
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[85861].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Robyn8243
              One thing you definitely want to consider if you do not always use double opt ins, is to remind your list at the top of the email of why they originally subscribed and how they can easily opt out to avoid spam complaints.

              A while ago I sent out a message to a list I had not kept up with...it was not a huge list and the handful of spam complaints were above aweber's allowed percentage and aweber would not allow me to use single opt ins anymore on that account.

              Without debating the merits of single or double optins, it is definitely nice to have a choice.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[85893].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author websitemoneynow
    Test it out , try sending some free motivational stuff or inspirational stuff , remind them of who you are and what you do . Be genuine then resume mailing to them regularly
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[85883].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author onlineleben
    Originally Posted by Jeannie Crabtree View Post

    ...that stopped recieving anything but broadcasts over a year ago.

    I only broadcast to that list every couple of months.
    That actually means the list is not inactive.
    Whats so bad about broadcast mails? If they are on topic and relate to what they originally subscribed to, then it is ok.
    If you think that the list is stale and you don't get enough out of it (sales), then probably something is wrong with your content.
    Maybe send out a reminder telling what they subscribed to (including subscription details like date, time, ip and website) and working unsubscribe link at the top and bottom of the mail.
    This way you remind those that trust you to stay and make it easy for others to leave without hitting the spam button.
    You cannot lose.
    Good luck.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[86154].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics