Pour the emotion in your personal life into your marketing

35 replies
So...

I'm going through some major, life-changing experiences right now in my life. And I'm feeling all kinds of HUGE emotion.

Through the eyes of a copywriter and marketer...

I'm grateful. I really am.

Because this whole advertising game is built on emotion.

This entire thing we call humanity is also built on emotion.

And anytime I get to experience emotion, I can pour it into my work.

Of course, I can also allow it to distract me and take me away from being productive.
It's a constant choice to feel, feel, feel... then redirect my attention to expressing myself in the form of copy...

And doing it in a way that creates more of an emotional connection with the people I want to help and work with.

What about you?

How do you take your life's experiences and use the emotion you feel to create an even bigger, more impactful... more authentic connection with your audience?

.............................

You know, it's weird...

It's like we're taught to hide our personal stuff; keep it separate from our professional life.

But that's so not the way it should be.

And besides, that's not what actually helps anyone... ever.

Because being able to truly share of ourselves, in everything we do, including our own marketing is such an amazing way to deepen our relationship with people...

Even complete strangers;

Especially complete strangers!

I mean...

We spend so much time trying to contrive emotion... or contrive the conversation we THINK people want to have. But we're so often wrong. WAY wrong.

So when we have the chance to simply share our experiences -- no holds barred...

It's always a path worth taking...

No matter how painful it might be; no matter how vulnerable it might make you feel.

We're ALL human, right?

So join me...

And whenever you ARE feeling genuine emotion... and you have the chance to pour it into your work... your advertising... and your relationships...

Seize the freaking moment man!

In other words...

Your work... your business... your campaigns...

They aren't separate from you.

They ARE you... or a part of you.

So ask yourself...

"How can I pour the emotion I'm feeling, from my personal life... into my marketing... and create an even deeper connection with the people I want to HELP?"

If you can answer that...

You're marketing will stand out in ways that nobody else's can.

Mark
#emotion #life #marketing #personal #pour
  • Profile picture of the author Lyfe Lyte
    EXACTLY....if you engage people..with your life..your passion...they will follow and take part with you...

    If you treat them as numbers they will respond as such..

    Look that the most successful people in the world...they all have passionate emotion! Just by seeing them at an early stage..you already know they will be great...

    I tell people...if marketing isn't your passion...and you love music..what they hell are you doing making websites and promoting SEO...UNLESS...you are doing it to get funds for your music..shows...learning marketing for you music etc...

    Don't let working online...or your regular job be all that you are doing in life...when you know your passion is elsewhere ..that will QUICKLY suck the soul out of your life...believe me I know....

    Go after what you love...and go after it like the world is imploding as you speak...

    Nothing is impossible...
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      I understand what you're saying but I would caution that too much emotion, constant emotion, or the wrong type of emotion can be a negative in your marketing.

      IMO, most prospects don't care about you or your emotions. They want to know how you are going to help them.

      Remember . . . "what's in it for me?"

      A little emotion usually helps your writing . . . but constant emotion . . . the kind that some "drama queens" (and "kings") display even in non-emotional settings can become very obnoxious.

      Who wants to be bombarded with tiring over-reactive and always-in-crisis-mode marketer that goes on and on about his/her poor plight?

      Who wants to listen to the shouting and yelling of the guy that had way too much sugar and caffeine for the past three days?

      Who will make a purchase from the marketer that spews hype and fluff so thick simply because he read somewhere that he needed to infuse his sales letter with "over the top" excess dripping with emotion?

      Who will want to subscribe to the marketer that goes on and on about how absurdly simple and cheap his product is compared to every other solution in the entire world?

      Emotion can be a real turn-off when it's faked, over done, used in every communication exactly the same way, not appropriate for the occasion, a time waster, offensive to the audience, or when it focuses on non-relevant small talk that adds nothing to the conversation.

      I'm certainly not against emotion in writing . . . but like most tactics, it is best used in moderation and appropriate context.

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author tenbears
        Mark, it sounds like you have the passion to tell quite a story which may resonate with your readers.

        Making an emotional connection with potential customers using contextual storytelling is one of the keys to persuasive internet marketing and indeed all forms of marketing.

        Personal stories make ideas tangible and memorable for your audience. Your product is no longer just another 'thing', it's got your own unique context and story behind it.

        By being just another copy-paste internet marketer, newbies to the industry tend to shoot themselves in the foot by not offering a true and unique engagement with their audience, and just blend into the crowd of the many others making the same mistake.

        By combining compelling facts with attractive, well-constructed and relevant stories using evocative metaphors, you will trigger all the necessary brain chemicals and subconscious programming to win over your prospect and get the sale.

        The next time you endorse a product online, instead of copy pasting the functions and benefits of the product, weave these around your story. You'll find this to be your most successful persuasion technique, whether selling, pre-selling or warming your market up to a sell.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

        I understand what you're saying but I would caution that too much emotion, constant emotion, or the wrong type of emotion can be a negative in your marketing.

        IMO, most prospects don't care about you or your emotions. They want to know how you are going to help them.

        Remember . . . "what's in it for me?"
        Ever heard the term, "Stories sell" Steve?

        When you open up about your story to prospects... who are experiencing the same thing... it's not a turn off; it's exciting for them.

        We are ALL archetypes. And being open with your experiences helps connect as real frickin' people. That's not just my belief either. I've written two 6 figure launches this month doing just that.

        Sure, if you're NOT your audience... in the sense that your experience is different than theirs, maybe it won't work.

        But the emotion you feel is called passion. It's called being human. And that's always an asset - when it's done in a deliberate way.

        Thanks for your input.
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        • Profile picture of the author Steve B
          Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

          Ever heard the term, "Stories sell" Steve?

          Certainly. But "pouring the emotion in your personal life into your marketing" is not typically the kind of story that I want to hear. When I am contemplating a purchase, I don't want your personal life or your emotions as a part of the deal. I don't make purchases based on them. I buy for the what the product will do for me, not because you have a sob story that I can relate to.


          Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

          Sure, if you're NOT your audience... in the sense that your experience is different than theirs, maybe it won't work.
          You are correct . . . you are not your audience. It's why doing market research is so important. You need to find out what your audience wants, how to best contact them, where they hang out. If you were your audience there would be no need for research . . . but that's the fool's game . . . assuming you are your audience. The Internet is littered with products that their creators fell in love with . . . but that nobody else wanted.

          Think about it . . . your experience is different than anyone elses. No one else thinks like you, has the same background, education, life experiences, training, resources, skills, personality, and on and on. We are all different, obviously.


          Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

          the emotion you feel is called passion.
          Mark, sorry, but emotion is not the same as passion and it's not always an asset even when it's presented in a deliberate way. Sadly there are many, many people in this world that are so filled with emotions they can hardly function.

          I'm not trying to convince you to change your opinion or adopt those that I have. Isn't that the reason for a forum like this . . . to express and discuss personal opinions?

          I stand by what I posted previously. What I want from a marketer is what his product will do for me. I'd rather not have his emotions, his personal life story "poured" into his marketing to me.

          Maybe that's how you think you can connect with me. I'm simply telling you that's not what I want. And obviously there are other marketers here that feel the same way.

          Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    I don't really think of emotions in relation to work and as for connecting with customers on a personal and emotional level, that's not really for me. I prefer to keep my business and customers at a professional level, not emotional and I keep my personal life out of my business life.

    Bringing passion for your business to the table is one thing ... bringing emotions? No.

    EDITED TO ADD: As a customer, I really don't like a vendor who brings their personal life into a business transaction or acts in any way other than professionally. An example: I was on a mailing list and the person started her mailing each time telling us every detail of her personal life, including marriage, turmoil, rants, etc. I was interested in her offers but not her personal life. I unsubscribed. When asked why, I told her ... I'm not interested in your personal life.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      EDITED TO ADD: As a customer, I really don't like a vendor who brings their personal life into a business transaction or acts in any way other than professionally. An example: I was on a mailing list and the person started her mailing each time telling us every detail of her personal life, including marriage, turmoil, rants, etc. I was interested in her offers but not her personal life. I unsubscribed. When asked why, I told her ... I'm not interested in your personal life.
      "Marketing is no longer about the stuff you make, but the stories you tell." - Seth Godin

      Do your research people.

      Many of the top performing campaigns are story-driven. Stories sell. Stories connect. Stories draw people in. That's reality.

      And honestly, I'm shocked by the attitude here. I hope none of are trying to sell the point of view that stories don't belong in marketing, because you'd be doing a disservice.

      Do your research.

      Mark
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      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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        Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

        "Marketing is no longer about the stuff you make, but the stories you tell." - Seth Godin

        Do your research people.

        Many of the top performing campaigns are story-driven. Stories sell. Stories connect. Stories draw people in. That's reality.

        And honestly, I'm shocked by the attitude here. I hope none of are trying to sell the point of view that stories don't belong in marketing, because you'd be doing a disservice.

        Do your research.

        Mark

        Well, this thread should also serve as a bit of market research. I'm not trying to sell any point at all ... just gave my opinion both as a vendor and a customer. You'll never sell me or even get my attention with stories and emotion, and neither has Seth Godin. That's reality.

        I assume by using the term campaigns you're talking about the kind of products (MMO) that people sell here. Never bought any and never will. I believe that there is a certain intelligence level (or lack thereof) in the people who make emotion based decisions rather than fact and rational based decisions and sure ... the emotional stuff probably works great with that audience.
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        • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
          Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

          I believe that there is a certain intelligence level (or lack thereof) in the people who make emotion based decisions rather than fact and rational based decisions ...
          Although you probably don't want to admit it (or simply aren't aware of it) the vast majority of your purchasing decisions are based on your emotions. (Well, that's if you're a "normal" human being like most people are.)
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          • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

            Although you probably don't want to admit it (or simply aren't aware of it) the vast majority of your purchasing decisions are based on your emotions. (Well, that's if you're a "normal" human being like most people are.)
            I never claimed any degree of "normality."
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            • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
              Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

              I never claimed any degree of "normality."


              Lol. Well OK. Join the club. ;-)
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      • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
        Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

        And honestly, I'm shocked by the attitude here. I hope none of are trying to sell the point of view that stories don't belong in marketing, because you'd be doing a disservice.

        Do your research.
        No need for the condescension, Mark. Most of the respondents in this thread are experienced marketers and are well aware of the value of research.

        We're also aware that you've steered the topic away from your OP in which you talk about pouring emotion from your personal life into your marketing (which is what most replies have referenced) to now make it about storytelling in general - and then feigning "shock" that we don't get it. That's a classic example of a straw man argument.

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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
          Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

          No need for the condescension, Mark. Most of the respondents in this thread are experienced marketers and are well aware of the value of research.

          We're also aware that you've steered the topic away from your OP in which you talk about pouring emotion from your personal life into your marketing (which is what most replies have referenced) to now make it about storytelling in general - and then feigning "shock" that we don't get it. That's a classic example of a straw man argument.

          .
          I'm being genuine. Not condescending... or an elitist prick. What I said is genuinely how I feel. If people aren't encouraged to tell their stories in today's marketing environment, you're in for an uphill battle.

          Most of the copywriters, even a-list level, struggle to beat their own controls... using trying to contrive emotion... or lead with a really conceptual hook.

          The idea that, "Just show me what it is... and I'll make my decision" isn't the way 99% of advertising works.
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          • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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            Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

            The idea that, "Just show me what it is... and I'll make my decision" isn't the way 99% of advertising works.
            It's the way my advertising has always worked, but I've always sold a different kind of product. No dreams, no promises. Software, themes, plugins, tangible items. I've always listed the product specs and benefits and costs.

            My customers appreciate it. They've commented on my no BS advertising and said that it instilled trust. They know what they're getting. And I've never wanted the Dreamer customer. You can have him. I want customers who know what I'm offering and have their own plan for using it. I don't want customers who have high expectations and most likely will end up not using the product or simply not getting the results that are implied or promised and being disappointed.
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            • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
              Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

              It's the way my advertising has always worked, but I've always sold a different kind of product. No dreams, no promises. Software, themes, plugins, tangible items. I've always listed the product specs and benefits and costs.

              My customers appreciate it. They've commented on my no BS advertising and said that it instilled trust. They know what they're getting. And I've never wanted the Dreamer customer. You can have him. I want customers who know what I'm offering and have their own plan for using it. I don't want customers who have high expectations and most likely will end up not using the product or simply not getting the results that are implied or promised and being disappointed.
              Suzanne, regardless of personal opinions...

              I think it's awesome you've developed a positive relationship with your customers... help them... and are abundant.

              Mark
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              • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
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                Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

                Suzanne, regardless of personal opinions...

                I think it's awesome you've developed a positive relationship with your customers... help them... and are abundant.

                Mark
                Thanks. That's really what it's all about Mark. Everyone has to do things in a way they are comfortable with and that's the bottom line for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author JC Web
    For myself, I can tell you that every time I get an email detailing what someone's going through in their personal life, I unsubscribe. It always comes across as if they are trying to manipulate their subscribers. It's fine to personalize your emails and act like a human being instead of a computer. But you also need to stay professional. When someone crosses that line, I no longer trust them to be professional in other aspects of their business and so will no longer do business with them.

    I've gotten emails from marketers detailing their personal struggles that left me thinking they were completely unstable. I got out of there quickly. I also resent someone trying to use me as their therapist - pay a professional for that. Even the emails that aren't as extreme as that still make the subscriber feel like you are trying to get them to feel sorry for you so that they will buy something from you. None of that is any good.

    Relating a short, not extremely personal, example from your own life that directly relates to what your customers signed up for is one thing. Putting your emotions and personal life and struggles into your emails is unprofessional and your customers don't deserve that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      I don't really think of emotions in relation to work and as for connecting with customers on a personal and emotional level, that's not really for me. I prefer to keep my business and customers at a professional level, not emotional and I keep my personal life out of my business life.

      Bringing passion for your business to the table is one thing ... bringing emotions? No.
      My only response is...

      Sales IS emotion; it's connecting with and leading emotion. We come from two different schools of thought.

      Originally Posted by JC Web View Post

      For myself, I can tell you that every time I get an email detailing what someone's going through in their personal life, I unsubscribe. It always comes across as if they are trying to manipulate their subscribers.
      Ever heard the term, "Masturbating people's emotions?"

      There's always agitation. And if it's done in poor taste, I don't blame you in your response.

      But when it's done well...

      Those are the biggest controls in the biz brother.
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      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

        My only response is...

        Sales IS emotion; it's connecting with and leading emotion. We come from two different schools of thought.

        Ever heard the term, "Masturbating people's emotions?"

        There's always agitation. And if it's done in poor taste, I don't blame you in your response.

        But when it's done well...

        Those are the biggest controls in the biz brother.
        Ughhh ... the term masturbating people's emotions really turns me off. I want to be blinded by facts, figures, benefits. Give me the emotional fervor of an evangelical preacher and I'm out of here. I can't stand it. It smacks of insincerity to me and fakeness. I don't make buying decisions emotionally. I make them based on need of a solution and buy if you can show me that the product will solve a problem for fulfill a need or want. Try to appeal to me with an emotional appeal and I am gone.

        Those are the biggest controls in the biz brother.
        You would have connected with me more if you had called me sister rather than the masculine term.
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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
          Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

          Ughhh ... the term masturbating people's emotions really turns me off. I want to be blinded by facts, figures, benefits. Give me the emotional fervor of an evangelical preacher and I'm out of here. I can't stand it. It smacks of insincerity to me and fakeness. I don't make buying decisions emotionally. I make them based on need of a solution and buy if you can show me that the product will solve a problem for fulfill a need or want. Try to appeal to me with an emotional appeal and I am gone.



          You would have connected with me more if you had called me sister rather than the masculine term.
          I totally get where you're coming from.

          If simply presenting facts and numbers works for you on cold... heck.... even warm traffic, awesome. That's not the reality for most people or companies. And I've worked with some of the best and most well-known.

          Just trying to help.

          Thanks for the feedback.
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          • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
            Mark, I think you're confusing the emotions of the marketer with those of the audience.

            Of course people are affected by emotion, and of course they buy products based on an emotional reaction. That's marketing 101. But the crucial element is that they have to feel emotional about the product - not the seller.

            If your stance is to open your heart and spill your innermost secrets in an effort to instill empathy in the minds of your prospects, then unless you're especially skilled or are exactly in tune with each of them, the risk is you'll end up coming across as desperate or fake - and turning off many more potential customers than you'll attract.

            And even if you succeed with that tactic it's likely to be a one-trick pony. There's a limit to how many products someone can sell using the same life-changing experience.

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  • Profile picture of the author TheZafraGroup
    Once you become true to yourself and transparent enough, people will see it. It will make them feel like they are a major part of your life because you've made a decision to share it with them. A lot of people appreciate that. It creates trust, engagement, excitement and most importantly...response. People will do what you ask them because they admire and respect you.

    It's about working not only from your mind, but your heart as well. Because if you're working from your heart, it means that your passion is kicking in and you're working to serve which in return, serves you well. I really agree with what you said.
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  • Profile picture of the author JC Web
    Well, I disagree. To me this is a symptom of how many internet marketers don't treat their business like a real business. If you buy software from Microsoft, you don't get emails from Bill Gates telling you about his feelings or what he's personally going through. You only get emails about their products. I just bought a phone from Samsung. I can guarantee you I'm not going to get emails telling me about their employees dating problems. Again, I will only get emails about their products.That is how real businesses operate.

    When I get emails from marketers that talk about their personal lives and feelings, I know they are not running a real business. So, I don't do business with them. I've gotten emails from internet marketers that tell me about the parties they went to over the weekend, who they're having sex with, their marriage problems, their kids, their mental illness, how drunk or hungover they are, their bad childhood, how much they love or hate their family members, how bad or how great their life is, how happy or depressed they are, etc. All of this is inappropriate.

    When you are sending an email, ask yourself, "Is this an email that a legitimate business person running a legitimate business selling legitimate products would send?" Would Microsoft send it? Would Samsung send it? Would the company you bought your refrigerator from send it? Would your car manufacturer send it? Real businesses don't send emails about their personal lives and personal emotions. Most internet marketers, sadly, are not running real businesses. If you don't take your own business seriously, don't expect anyone else to.
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  • This is quite different in the marketing/advertising field. If you are doing a literary piece, then emotions are good to use as your creative drive to come up with a really nice story or poem.

    Personally, I would not use my emotions when it comes to copywriting or to affiliate marketing. I would stick to market research and to the how-tos on making a good sales copy or a quality website.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      Originally Posted by affilorama-portal View Post

      Personally, I would not use my emotions when it comes to copywriting ...

      All of the best Direct Marketing Ads (IMO) are those that are infused with passion and emotion. Why? Because it's been proven that emotion influences people more than reason and logic.
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  • Profile picture of the author Time Transporter
    I just want to make someone happy he said and ...
    vanished into the woods. Then the flock followed his lead beseeching for more.
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  • The best stories are all made up.

    All you gotta figure is the metaphor for delivering the narrative.

    Spoonfuls of favorite sugar?

    Or meds injected covertly at dead of night?

    Feeling's a bitch here because all shades of narrative run on the stuff, but if shit goes too twonky, you lose control of the plot.

    Spoonfuls of sugar end up in assholes, and the medics rumble your skulduggery.

    If you're gonna go down the feeling route, remember it's a bronco some folks don't want in their china shop.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
      Originally Posted by Princess Balestra View Post

      The best stories are all made up.

      All you gotta figure is the metaphor for delivering the narrative.

      Spoonfuls of favorite sugar?

      Or meds injected covertly at dead of night?

      Feeling's a bitch here because all shades of narrative run on the stuff, but if shit goes too twonky, you lose control of the plot.

      Spoonfuls of sugar end up in assholes, and the medics rumble your skulduggery.

      If you're gonna go down the feeling route, remember it's a bronco some folks don't want in their china shop.
      I need an interpreter.
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      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

        I need an interpreter.
        I'm afraid that there are none here who speak that language. lol.
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  • Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

    I need an interpreter.
    Ok, so here's where it gets a whole lot worse.

    The best stories are all made up.

    [Because people do great stuff, like climb mountains, or point up smaller triumphs in triumphant ways.]

    All you gotta figure is the metaphor for delivering the narrative.

    [Because Godin is right.]

    Spoonfuls of favorite sugar?

    [“Give the client what they want!”]

    Or meds injected covertly at dead of night?

    [This is the political angle: warming up Joe Public for imminent nuclear Armageddon or buttering folks up for ideological/controversial/difficult changes.]

    Feeling's a bitch here because all shades of narrative run on the stuff, but if shit goes too twonky, you lose control of the plot.

    [All stories hook on feelings, from SPOON UP OUR YUMMY SUGARY DRINK to MIGRANTS WILL **** YOUR KIDS. You pick your narrative to suit. BUT (returning to the original question) if you allow your own feelings to start dictating the show, everything goes twonky. You are not in control, and the emotions you seek to prick up in others take second place to the Vhoosh of your own Touchy Feely, with the result that...]

    Spoonfuls of sugar end up in assholes, and the medics rumble your skulduggery.

    [...you fail to give clients what they want OR your manipulative and devious ways of subtly persuadin' GET SPOTTED. In both cases: it's a bummer!]

    If you're gonna go down the feeling route, remember it's a bronco some folks don't want in their china shop.

    [So, going too much on feeling can get in the way of the craft. And even if you get it right, and you channel your feelings down one heckuva precise narrative track, everyone feels different shit, and your gallumphin' big ole heart might just scare the bejesus out of everyone else.]
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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    See .... I knew that.
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  • Profile picture of the author natas105
    I have the feeling not everyone understands Mark's point of view.
    Here's what I think...
    If what you do works, then keep doing what works. Experiencing a down fall? Be open to suggestions of others, and try out new things so you can keep bringing your A-game.

    I think we can all agree that people are sold to all day, every day. It can be challenging to find your prospect's trigger. That's where proper research will help you out.
    Coupons/discounts aint gonna cut it anymore. Scarcity tactis work,but most people use them in a way that makes you want to puke.

    In general...people are curious by nature. They WANT to connect. They want backstage passes. They crave for that inside information. They want to be entertained.
    That's why people love Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Youtube.
    Why do you think Jerry Springer, Oprah and real-life-soap operas did/do well?
    (behind the scenes) Info, emotion, entertainment. Can't deny those numbers.

    If you can give people what they want, you would be a fool to look the other way. People love stories!
    You don't have to milk it. You're not trying to squeese tears out of your audience nor do you want them to go look for a rope to hang themselves with.

    But... you do want to stand apart from you competition, don't you? There are plenty of niches that are emotionally driven. Health, Weightloss, Parenting, Travelling, Relationships, Personal development and so on.

    A story that EXCITES, ENTERTAINS, INFORMS, and CAPTIVATES your audience is a winner in my eyes. If done properly you're inviting your ideal audience into your past, present...and...your future->their outcome.

    In short: its not just the story, but it can definately be a game changer. If you have a heck of a story to tell, you SHOULD...and... give your competition the finger while doing so.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vevek Gahatraj
    Making ourselves Vulnerable and sharing our personal life story needs a Big HEART. And also the Business is all about... How Warm and Big Hearted one person can be in sharing and caring about others as well. What you have within will reflect outside like in Your work... your business... your campaigns...

    And this is true in most of the people's life who are successful.
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  • Profile picture of the author Yusei Imafuku
    Great stuff, keep it coming people!
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  • Guess you gotta know how you stand on the Vamp deal.
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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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