Your Key Interview Question

46 replies
Hey Warriors,

If you were hiring someone, what would be your key question you would ask them and why? What answers are you looking to hear? What are you hoping they don't say? This question is not job specific and not meant to be a brain teaser. It can be a situational question, behavioural question, psychological etc.

There are no real right or wrong answers to this question. It's a question to learn how the applicant thinks.

I find these questions very interesting in interviews and can qualify an applicant much better than learning what they studied for 10 years at Harvard.

Cheers!

Mark
#interview #key #question
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  • Profile picture of the author jmosticc22
    I like to ask Do you have any questions for me or about the company? If they have good questions you know they did their homework and take true interest in the job/company. Pretty simple but it is important, at least to me.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelQuinn
    Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

    Hey Warriors,

    If you were hiring someone, what would be your key question you would ask them and why? What answers are you looking to hear? What are you hoping they don't say? This question is not job specific and not meant to be a brain teaser. It can be a situational question, behavioural question, psychological etc.

    There are no real right or wrong answers to this question. It's a question to learn how the applicant thinks.

    I find these questions very interesting in interviews and can qualify an applicant much better than learning what they studied for 10 years at Harvard.

    Cheers!

    Mark

    Hey Mark,

    When interviewing potential applicants for my security guard program one of the essential questions that I like to ask is about the applicants weaknesses. When the applicant answers, the weakness itself isn't what I'm interested in, but whether the applicant is willing to identify potential flaws, how they perceive those flaws, if there are potential complement to the flaw, and a willingness to try and improve it.

    For example, one applicant identified their verbal communication skills as being stronger than their written communication skills and asserted that their strong verbal communication skills make them more proficient in conflict resolution and crisis deescalation. The applicant then offered a potential solution for improving their written communication skills by practicing taking better field notes and also asked if he would be able to receive additional training in report writing.

    Hope that helps a little bit!
    Best,
    Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Do you love it here?

    Or....

    Do you love this job?

    Or...

    Do you love this niche?
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    • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
      Originally Posted by ryanbiddulph View Post

      Do you love it here?

      Or....

      Do you love this job?

      Or...

      Do you love this niche?
      all you need is love, love is all you need
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I used to ask about their previous employer.

    This told me everything I needed to know.

    Good employees invariably said good things about their previous employer. They talked about what they learned, how they advanced, and how they were sorry that they had to leave.

    The bad employees invariably talked about how their previous employer cheated them, how the office was political, how the company was dishonest.

    Why? Because whatever they say about their previous employer...in 2 weeks, that's what they are going to say about you. The complainers never worked out.

    If possible, I also wanted to see the spouse at the same time. Why? I wanted to see the reactions. Is the new guy lying about anything? I would ask the spouse what she/he thought of the last employer.

    But mostly, I wanted to see support from the spouse. If they argued in front of me, I wouldn't hire the person. A person with an unhappy home life will bring the drama to work. And I hate drama.
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    • Profile picture of the author MichaelQuinn
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      I used to ask about their previous employer.

      This told me everything I needed to know.

      Good employees invariably said good things about their previous employer. They talked about what they learned, how they advanced, and how they were sorry that they had to leave.

      The bad employees invariably talked about how their previous employer cheated them, how the office was political, how the company was dishonest.

      Why? Because whatever they say about their previous employer...in 2 weeks, that's what they are going to say about you. The complainers never worked out.
      I absolutely agree with you Claude, bad mouthing a previous employer is a major turn off and gives the impression that the potential employee is only concerned with what the company has to offer them, instead of what they can offer the company. Employees that express gratitude and feel as if they have something to offer and are enthusiastic about contributing and learning new skills are more productive and valuable.
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      • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
        Sometimes companies do treat employees poorly though. Although we should never bring that up in an interview, if they were honest and telling the truth, it doesn't mean they will disrespect or bad mouth the company 2 weeks later. Sometimes an employee has a right to be bitter? ...Unless we go the "whatever doesn't kill us makes us stronger" route, and take the higher road. That's a tricky one I think, no?
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

          Sometimes companies do treat employees poorly though. Although we should never bring that up in an interview, if they were honest and telling the truth, it doesn't mean they will disrespect or bad mouth the company 2 weeks later. Sometimes an employee has a right to be bitter? ...Unless we go the "whatever doesn't kill us makes us stronger" route, and take the higher road. That's a tricky one I think, no?
          I'm glad you brought that up.

          Sure, I've heard horror stories about employers...and from new hires. But there is more to the interview. Their attitude will carry over into other subjects. And, I'll ask about the employer before the bad one.

          Here's what I don't want to hear...something like...."So and So got promoted before me. It isn't fair. I was there longer". See how all the responsibility shifts to the employer?

          Or "I was there for a year, and never got a raise I was promised". I would then ask "What was different after a year that made you deserve a raise?" I want to see how they handle a direct question. Because that's how I'll talk to them after they are hired.

          I want to see responsibility. What I don't want is seeing a pattern of blaming others.


          Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

          Interesting thoughts about having the spouse present. I've never heard of that before. It's smart and makes sense, but I'm sure it probably has them on edge? I'm trying to put myself in that position. I don't know if I'd be more comfortable or more nervous with my spouse beside me in an interview. I'd be worried she would either a) say I can do a lot more than I can or b) how much I don't do around the house...I hold my own around the house just for the record, but catch her on a bad day and you'd believe otherwise!

          What I'm looking for is support from the spouse. I usually don't meet her/him on the first interview. It's when I've pretty much decided to hire them that I want to meet them together.

          I want to see the spouse defending their mate. The thing that will kill an interview is seeing the spouse verbally attack the new hire. I don't want to see friction between them.

          You see, I'm generally hiring a sales rep. And it was straight commission. After a bad day, I don't want the rep to go home to a nest of hornets. And...these arguments and insults wear the new guy out...

          And most importantly, they seep into the business. And I won't allow it.

          I once had a rep's wife storm into the office about his pay. They both stood in front of me arguing over how much it should have been. After a few minutes I said "She's right. I'll adjust your check". She said "See? He agrees with me".

          I said "No. I said you were right about his check being wrong. I don't agree with you coming into my office and yelling at your husband. I don't agree with you disturbing the office. Either you have to leave, or both of you have to leave. Your choice."

          I hate....hate drama. I'm so fortunate that I'm married to a woman that feels the same way.
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          • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
            Not many employers would care what's going on at home, as long as they didn't bring it to work. You make sure to nip that in the butt before they're even hired, which is interesting at least in the method you chose. You must have been a good boss to work for!
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      Interesting thoughts about having the spouse present. I've never heard of that before. It's smart and makes sense, but I'm sure it probably has them on edge? I'm trying to put myself in that position. I don't know if I'd be more comfortable or more nervous with my spouse beside me in an interview. I'd be worried she would either a) say I can do a lot more than I can or b) how much I don't do around the house...I hold my own around the house just for the record, but catch her on a bad day and you'd believe otherwise!
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  • Profile picture of the author luciesmazanska
    I mean the whole thing about this hiring questions is a funny concept....I mean I dont understand why HRs or CEOs are aiming their attention and make impressions based on If people did they homework and prepared for interview lol..

    It should be taken from a completely different angle and focus what you feel and listen to your gut (if you are a good HR or CEO) and decide based on that.

    As a CEO of more companies I can say the best is listen to what you feel, even if they answer something wrong or they dont know what to answer, at the end we are still humans and it can easily happen you deny a very qualitative employee just because he didnt answer something..
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    • Profile picture of the author MichaelQuinn
      Originally Posted by luciesmazanska View Post

      I mean the whole thing about this hiring questions is a funny concept....I mean I dont understand why HRs or CEOs are aiming their attention and make impressions based on If people did they homework and prepared for interview lol..

      It should be taken from a completely different angle and focus what you feel and listen to your gut (if you are a good HR or CEO) and decide based on that.

      As a CEO of more companies I can say the best is listen to what you feel, even if they answer something wrong or they dont know what to answer, at the end we are still humans and it can easily happen you deny a very qualitative employee just because he didnt answer something..
      As for preparation, a person that prepares for an interview indicates that they are taking the interview seriously compared to a person that has not. I think that asking the right questions and paying attention to detail is part of what helps to establish how your "gut feels" about the potential applicant.

      Wouldn't you agree that asking the right questions is a way to establish whether the potential employee is qualified or not?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by luciesmazanska View Post


      It should be taken from a completely different angle and focus what you feel and listen to your gut (if you are a good HR or CEO) and decide based on that.

      My gut is always wrong. Maybe because my gut has no brain.
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      • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
        My gut isn't great at reading people either...I've hired people who were super sharp in their interview and turned out to be complete duds and didn't make it through probation. They researched the company, knew how many stores we had, what we sold in all of them, sold me a random product in the store on the spot etc etc and then could never show up on time, had no initiative, poor attention to detail.

        I've hired others who were very shy and timid in their interview, had to pull words out of them, couldn't answer half the questions, but tried them out anyway because we were desperate (living in an area with a very small talent pool). It turned out they were rock stars. They would always find something to do, eager to learn, pick up new skills quickly, always on time and great with customers.

        I had the same conversation with the new hiring manager today. I explained to her that on this island you just never know. You have to try most of them out and see what happens. Higher level questions do not work with these applicants, nor do gut feelings. The interview is mostly just a formality.
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

          My gut isn't great at reading people either...I've hired people who were super sharp in their interview and turned out to be complete duds and didn't make it through probation. They researched the company, knew how many stores we had, what we sold in all of them, sold me a random product in the store on the spot etc etc and then could never show up on time, had no initiative, poor attention to detail.

          I've hired others who were very shy and timid in their interview, had to pull words out of them, couldn't answer half the questions, but tried them out anyway because we were desperate (living in an area with a very small talent pool). It turned out they were rock stars. They would always find something to do, eager to learn, pick up new skills quickly, always on time and great with customers.

          I had the same conversation with the new hiring manager today. I explained to her that on this island you just never know. You have to try most of them out and see what happens. Higher level questions do not work with these applicants, nor do gut feelings. The interview is mostly just a formality.
          I didn't care if they were shy or outgoing. I looked for indications that they were trouble.
          Contradictions in answers, blaming others repeatedly, taking personal jabs at others. Sharing confidential information about a competitor is a bad sign.

          But I make it clear that the first 30 days are really conditional, and they can be let go for any reason. Bad employees usually show their true nature the first week.
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  • Profile picture of the author momohgist
    Who are you?


    This question is meant to bring out the qualities in them. Some people don't really know how to answer this question.
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      When you ask this question, do most people start talking about their qualities with you? If you asked me that question, I would be wondering what you're trying to know about me, but I wouldn't guess you wanted me to discuss my qualities...especially since I put my best foot forward in my customized resume and cover letter, outlining every quality about me that would serve to be an asset for your company. Therefore, aside from regurgitating my application form, I honestly wouldn't know what you were digging for with that question.
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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    wow someone finally asked a question here i can't really attempt to help with .. or add anything you can use..

    i don't care what people think .. i can read that easy enough i care about people drugs of choice . i'm a gamer i drink .. and rarely smoke pot.so i can deal with others who occasionally use it.. and people who drink but can maintain a decent personality ..and don't come into work drunk . i can't stand working with people who do stimulants.. coke meth.. or what ever heroin is ..

    if they have the hard drug habits they are probably not going to make enough money with me without stealing from me .. sure they will work circles around people..to prove how good they are while the boss is watching ..

    and i don't trust people who don't have some vice they can be open about ..or who try to pose a virtue as a false vice.. oh i work to hard or something of the sort .. i can only function around people who are similarly as dysfunctional as me ..

    so my interview question would be.."if your not driving .. lets got get a couple beers i'm buying " as long as their over 21 or legal age haha ..

    so again nothing you can really use .. it more i know my personality.. and who i can stand being around and who can stand being around me ..
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      haha glad I was able to stump you!

      so my interview question would be.."if your not driving .. lets got get a couple beers i'm buying "
      lol What's your question in there? Are you asking or telling them to go for a beer with you? If it's a woman, she'd probably take that the wrong way as well? I feel like you wouldn't care haha
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  • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
    if i said you had a beautiful body would you hold it against me
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    • Profile picture of the author Odahh
      Originally Posted by hardraysnight View Post

      if i said you had a beautiful body would you hold it against me
      Hell no.. it such a pain to take it out of statis or storage ..it rots a little evey time.. so much better to just look at it ..
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      Depending if you're a guy or girl and what sex the applicant is, that could be an awkward question?? I'd probably want to know how much the position pays first before answering your question....and the position I'm referring to is not against your body.

      Same as Odahh...you are both assuming you are interviewing only one of the sexes haha
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesan
    I would like to ask, Why should we hire you? And If we hire you, What will you do with your first salary?
    These questions tell more about a person's nature.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
    I'd use the modern and playful method, by asking:

    'Pineapple on pizza?'


    This, unsuspectingly reveals a plethora of personal traits.

    A big 'EXIT' sign brightly lit, for those who say 'No' - or anything to that effect, and a juicy salary for the first person to agree...
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  • I'd give them a logic puzzle. Like the ones I've seen in TED-ed videos (https://blog.ed.ted.com/2016/02/02/c...ed-ed-riddles/).

    I want to see how they work through a puzzle. Do they get frustrated easily? Do they ask questions? Do they pay attention? How do they handle stress?

    I'm not looking for candidates who can give the right answers. With these puzzles, I find it easier to fine people who:
    - think out of the box,
    - are persistent
    - willing to ask questions
    - don't crack under pressure
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      Exactly. That's the kind of thing I was thinking about when asking this question. I don't care about the "right" answer. A candidate can just as easily get the position with an incorrect answer and a brilliant explanation why they believe that answer to be correct. HOW they work through adversity is much more important to me than always getting the right answer.

      If the riddles can somehow be twisted to be applied to the actual job, even better.

      Thanks, John!
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      • Profile picture of the author Odahh
        Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

        Exactly. That's the kind of thing I was thinking about when asking this question. I don't care about the "right" answer. A candidate can just as easily get the position with an incorrect answer and a brilliant explanation why they believe that answer to be correct. HOW they work through adversity is much more important to me than always getting the right answer.

        If the riddles can somehow be twisted to be applied to the actual job, even better.

        Thanks, John!
        i like picking peoples brains here .. when i find i believe there is something in their i want to learn..

        how much adversity do you expect the people you are hiring to deal with.. because there are many different types ..

        are we talking adversity that crops up from time to time in the job.. or advertsity created by bad management choices .. that falls on employees to fix .. sometime repeatedly

        at this point if you want questions on that tell you how they would respond to on the job adversity.. explain problem that regularly happen or occasionally happen ..having to do with the job.. or local environment that would effect the job from time to time ..
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  • Profile picture of the author sgalla414
    This thread might be dead but I just came across it today and thought it was super interesting, I love these types of questions. One question that I came across a while back that I thought would be a great interview question, although I have never been personally asked nor know anyone who has is;

    What is something you have accomplished that you are most proud of?

    For this I would like to hear something that took a sacrifice of time, energy or a ton of commitment not so much a monetary thing. If I asked that question and someone said they're most proud of finishing a marathon or something along those lines I think it really speaks to the type of person and maybe something that isnt as easily BS'd.
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      Threads are never dead if people continuing commenting! I think you're question is a common question in an interview though? You've never been asked this before? I have been asked a couple times during Government interviews. I don't remember the answers I gave, but you're right, it does speak to someone's character and worth asking.

      The opposite type of question can also be asked: what is something you are most ashamed or embarrassed for not accomplishing at this point in your career?

      I think it's easier for people to talk about their achievements and successes, but what about their failures? And how have they dealt or are dealing with them?

      Someone mentioned earlier that it's better to find out how someone will react under adversity. Everyone is cool when things are good, but things are never ALWAYS good in a job (unless you're a puppy walker?), so it's important to know how they will react in those adverse situations.
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      • Profile picture of the author sgalla414
        Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

        Threads are never dead if people continuing commenting! I think you're question is a common question in an interview though? You've never been asked this before? I have been asked a couple times during Government interviews. I don't remember the answers I gave, but you're right, it does speak to someone's character and worth asking.

        The opposite type of question can also be asked: what is something you are most ashamed or embarrassed for not accomplishing at this point in your career?

        I think it's easier for people to talk about their achievements and successes, but what about their failures? And how have they dealt or are dealing with them?

        Someone mentioned earlier that it's better to find out how someone will react under adversity. Everyone is cool when things are good, but things are never ALWAYS good in a job (unless you're a puppy walker?), so it's important to know how they will react in those adverse situations.
        I apologize for not replying before. I didn't realize you had responded. I have never personally been asked that question before. I forget where I heard it but I thought it was such a great question from an interviewer perspective. I have been asked a lot of "adverse" situation questions. Personally those always bugged me because they're standard HR protocol questions. Questions like "how do you deal with a person/ coworker you don't get along well with" I feel like these are too easy to answer and I feel like MOST people just fly off the top of their head, the answers that are given are what interviewees think the interviewer will most want to hear rather than an honest answer. Just my 0.02
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  • Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

    Hey Warriors,

    If you were hiring someone, what would be your key question you would ask them and why? What answers are you looking to hear? What are you hoping they don't say? This question is not job specific and not meant to be a brain teaser. It can be a situational question, behavioural question, psychological etc.

    There are no real right or wrong answers to this question. It's a question to learn how the applicant thinks.

    I find these questions very interesting in interviews and can qualify an applicant much better than learning what they studied for 10 years at Harvard.

    Cheers!

    Mark

    Very interesting topic. I never thought of myself being in that position of interviewing for a job.

    Nevertheless, I supposed I would stay away from the cliche interview questions such as: 1) Tell me about yourself 2) What should I hire you? 3) Where do you see yourself in 5 years....blah, blah, blah!

    I would try to ask deep and relevant questions regarding the position like:

    1. Apart from needed the money, what other reasons do you have for want to work here?

    2. You can be honest, how long do you want to work for me.

    3. I expect you to do your work, as there any reason do you know that will keep you from doing it a month or so after you get started?

    .....questions like that.


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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
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  • "If a bat peed in my hair when I was down, wouldya lick it off jus' bcs?"
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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    I frequently hire new salespeople, all of which generally have very impressively polished resumes - often claiming near super-human accomplishments and experience.

    It's all BS (for a salesman, that's expected and actually a good initial indicator) But while an applicant is in my office for an interview, I first scan through their resume and scribble notes without even saying anything at all.

    Then looking up, my first question is just "So, why are you here?"

    I don't care what the answer is. But their reaction, poise, closing skills, and level of composure towards that one question is more telling than any interview can show. And saves me a whole lot of time weeding out the most unlikely candidates.
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      I don't care what the answer is.
      I like that you also think like this. It's not so much WHAT the answer is to some questions, it's HOW they are answered. How long they take, where they look, body language, tone etc. I think you can get much more information from those type of questions than anything else. You can always give BS answers, but you can't BS physiology near as easily.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    I think some of these answers are over thinking the hiring process....I've watched many interviews (and been in a few) where the interviewer is so focused on asking 'leading' questions that he missed the substance of the person being interviewed.


    Then looking up, my first question is just "So, why are you here?"

    And with that simple, impersonal question you can observe how the person handles himself, his demeanor as he thinks about an answer, judge his sales skills and people skills.


    The biggest mistake I've seen in interviews are those who try to 'psych out' the person being interviewed as if it's a contest. They risk getting into personal areas that should be off limits and also learn little about the person being interviewed.


    Just like in sales -if the interviewer is talking, he's not learning anything about the candidate.
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  • Gotta figure weirdsy mind tricks are no substitoot for layin' out straight offahs before a potentially wobbly responder.

    Worst case scenario?

    The interviewer who feigns death.

    Critical moment, the guy falls to the ground, havin' chomped on a BLOOD CAPSULE.

    Top-of-the-range (ahem) personal entertainment products concealed about his person power up the Seizure Scenario to the max.

    An' an unseen alarm goes BLEEP BLEEP BLEEP BLEEP.

    Tellya, anywan pulls that stunt on Moi, I am up outta my seat with a heel to the guy's neck.

    "500 dollars to take the batteries out," I'd whisper, "then we can discuss wipin' your face clean as a baby's ass."

    Natchrlly, ima open to makin' a mistake -- like sendin' sum innocent to death row.

    That's why I would always endeavor to pack JUICY CANDY as a fallback.

    Anywan actshwlly dyin' still responds to that crap -- an' I got a certificate from the School of Baaahdy Language says I am sufficiently boned up to recognize the signs.

    Wanna also be clear how I would nevah squish a mouse in my apartment jus' bcs.

    Yeah, so ... interview guys who feign death.

    Whatta buncha a**holes.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mr Blip
    Still sounds like an article spinner acting up
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Critical moment, the guy falls to the ground, havin' chomped on a BLOOD CAPSULE.

    I hate when that happens!
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  • Profile picture of the author LindyUK
    We do things in a very different way that works well for us. We don't like the normal interview process. First, how much can you really learn about someone in a 15 to 30 minute interview? The one you are interviewing is going to be on their very best for that small amount of time, or they might be so nervous of the interview and you that that effects their performance. Of our 76 employees only our 15 salespeople have gone through formal interviews, and not by us, by a recruitment firm.

    Our Agency is run from our home, a very large 240 + year old English Manor House 10 minutes outside of town. Our office suite is a former drawing room on the 2nd floor, along side our bedrooms, and that, along with the fact we run 3 shifts means we only employ women here.

    We always have a large waiting list of young women from town, often friends or relatives of our employees so never have to advertise (we prefer to train our own employees) so our procedure is:

    1. Call in say 2 girls from the list who have a brief meeting with Jem (one of our Supervisors) A really informal chat where they are asked to bring school records or employment history and any references etc., as well as complete an application form.

    2. If that goes fine they are invited to come back and spend a working day with us, so they can experience an actual working day here. They are looked after by the girls on the shift, shown the type of work they will be doing. They are also spending their breaks and lunch time with the staff (we provide meals for our staff) so by the end of the day they have experienced an 8 hour working day with us, and our staff have been able to evaluate them over that period. Not only their interest but also how they fit in, their personalities and so on.

    3. At the end of the day someone takes them back downstairs for tea or coffee while the girls on shift tell me about the day. We really leave it to our staff to decide if we should hire them or not. Very few have gone through the day without being hired.

    4. They then have what they think will be the main interview with me, but my time is really telling them they have the job and welcoming them to our family, as well as explaining wages, benefits and so on.

    In our 14 years, 12 with staff, we have never had to lay anyone off, and only lost 3 employees when they had to move away from town after marriage.

    I don't think any questions I could ask or any answers they could give in the short normal interview process could improve on our process.

    Cheers
    Lindy
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      I don't think many companies or firms hire the way you do, and it's a shame. You're absolutely correct in saying that there isn't one particular question that makes or breaks a candidate.

      You are certainly doing something very well in your company if you've maintained most of the staff you started with 12 years ago. Why fix what's not broken?

      In the past, I've hired people who didn't have great interviews (desperate for help) and turned out to be absolute rock stars. I've also hired people who had seemingly perfect interviews and were so lazy you'd think they came from a family of sloths.

      There are many different approaches that companies can take in interviews, but it's always psychological and a gut feeling in the end. The interviewer can take a complicated line of questioning to lead or break the candidate, or they can be completely chill and relaxed and have an informal conversation. However, I still believe the interviewer is seeking particular bits of information no matter which approach is taken.

      Just because an interview is light and informal, doesn't mean any less information is acquired than a formal hard line of complicated questioning.

      On a separate note, I'd like a tour of your office someday, Lindy! I've never heard of an all female business based in a 240 year old manor before. Very cool
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  • Profile picture of the author bifrmcm
    Like you, befuddled I was until I realized there was a way out.
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  • Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

    Hey Warriors,

    If you were hiring someone, what would be your key question you would ask them and why? What answers are you looking to hear? What are you hoping they don't say? This question is not job specific and not meant to be a brain teaser. It can be a situational question, behavioural question, psychological etc.

    There are no real right or wrong answers to this question. It's a question to learn how the applicant thinks.

    I find these questions very interesting in interviews and can qualify an applicant much better than learning what they studied for 10 years at Harvard.

    Cheers!

    Mark
    Instead of asking questions to qualify applicants, I would take a page from Google's Hiring Book:

    Google is a massive company.

    They need to hire fast. But they need to hire good.

    They don't have time to do it slowly. Yet the don't have time to make mistakes.

    So what did they do?

    They conducted a study. On the hiring practices that lead to the best overall employee hires.

    They tried different methods. And gauged the level of employees obtained from the process.

    Interviewing was near the very bottom of the list.

    At the very top?

    Giving potential employees an actual, live, on-site test run. To see how they actually handle the work in real time.
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    • Profile picture of the author palmtreelife
      Giving potential employees an actual, live, on-site test run. To see how they actually handle the work in real time.
      Similar to what Lindy said she does in her business. It's a smart concept. If Google can do something like that within their highly confidential walls, I'm sure many others can afford to do the same for the sake of hiring excellent employees.
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      • Originally Posted by palmtreelife View Post

        Similar to what Lindy said she does in her business. It's a smart concept. If Google can do something like that within their highly confidential walls, I'm sure many others can afford to do the same for the sake of hiring excellent employees.
        We didn't do that with salespeople...but we did with telephone appointment setters. A day at the office told us everything we needed to know about them.

        They could either do the work, or not. They either got along with the others...or not.
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  • Profile picture of the author LindyUK
    Hello palmtreelife

    Just to clear something, we are not an all female business and it's not only females who live here. My Dad (John) and Sherri's boyfriend (David) live here too, and all our sales people and a few staff based in Romania, India and Philippines are male.

    We also have a very different way to most companies of treating our employees which ensures they stay with us. We don't want to waste all the training we give them or have any leave and go to any of our competitors, but this also ensures a wonderful working environment here with our employees caring as much about the business as we do.

    We treat our employees like family and they share in the rewards of building our businesses.

    First comes double the award pay, even for the youngest girls just starting with us.

    We provide meals for them (as we are 10 minutes out of town and run 3 shifts) so we cover breakfast, lunch and dinner. Anna organizers all that. We actually have a sign up over the door of the dining room we use that says Anna's Restaurant, because it seems that way. A lot of our staff, say on the day shift, will come for breakfast too, or stay for dinner after their shifts. Anna jokes that she thinks a lot actually live here somewhere because they don't ever seem to go home.

    They can actually stay beyond their shifts, we have a fully equipped gym that includes a hot tub and sauna, and an outside pool and BBQ area for summer. There are about 20 bedrooms here, over the years we renovated the former women's staff quarters in the attic and men's quarters over the coach house/stables, so often girls do stay over, especially in bad weather.

    Then we have things like Birthday celebrations, Christmas parties and so on, with really nice presents for them and Christmas hampers for their families or parents.

    We take everyone for a 2 week holiday after Christmas. They always pick Hawaii. We go in two batches so still staff here to maintain our business. That's all expense's paid in a huge luxury resort plus all the activities plus spending money.

    When they have been with us for 2 years they enter our profit sharing scheme.

    When they have been with us for 3 years we give them an audi hatchback car for Christmas.

    Now, are they going to leave us? I don't think so, they must be the most spoiled girls in the whole of England, but our thinking is that we could not do this, have this success without them, so they should also share in the rewards. John took this idea from how some Japanese companies treat their employees, but we have ramped it up some. (or a lot! lol)

    Where a lot of workers just hate their jobs because of the way they are treated by the companies they work for, (like some huge companies here penny pinching and hardly paying their employees a living wage) our employees just love their jobs and love working for us, and are very very productive. They feel they are a real part of our business and part of our family.


    Oh another thing I'll add, we have our own creche with a full time qualified nanny. We currently have 3 little ones in there, a baby and 2 toddlers. Their Mum's can go spend time with them, feed them, even bring them into the office suite for awhile. Why lose our staff when they have babies when we can easily solve that problem for them.


    Cheers
    Lindy
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